superschwein22
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Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:09 am
Location: Attleboro, Ma

start from seed?

I was planning on growing several plants this year that I haven't see at any local store and wanted to order seeds for them instead. I don't have a greenhouse or anything of that nature and was just planning on starting the seeds inside in front of a window. Many people are telling me that it would be a great waste of my time since they predict they will just die on me. I figured I could try and do a combination of starting some seeds inside and then seeding outside in the spring. The particular plants I was thinking of are the poached egg plant and lupines. My two parted question is when should I start the inside ones and do I stand a chance of growing some usable seedlings without extra lighting?

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Kisal
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I've grown both of those plants. The poached egg plant is an annual, and lupine is a perennial.

Annuals will flower the first year you plant them. Unless your annuals reseed themselves, they have to be replanted every spring. Apparently, the poached egg plant is known for self-seeding to the point that some people consider it invasive, but they never self-seeded for me. I had to replant them every year.

Perennials die back in the fall and resprout in the spring, so don't usually need to be reseeded. Lupines are referred to as "short-lived" perennials and just don't last as long as some. Others, such as peonies, will return for many years. I've heard that some lupines flower sparsely the first year, but mine did not. I had tons of flowers in following years, though.

I started both the poached egg plant seeds and the lupine seeds outdoors. Lupines like a short cold period before they'll sprout, which would probably be easier to provide by just planting the seed outdoors. They also have a long taproot, which tends to make them not take well to transplanting. I don't know that that means you shouldn't start them indoors in containers, but it's something I'd be wary of. I've never had luck transplanting plants, even small starts, that have taproots.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

superschwein22
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Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:09 am
Location: Attleboro, Ma

Thank you for your input. That seems to be pretty much the consensus of what I'm hearing. I might just do a combination of indoors/ outdoors to cover all my bases. Especially since I don't really have a good set up for indoor it probably wouldn't be all that successful.

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mtmickey
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Location: Ronan, MT

I have started lupine both indoors and outdoors and both did great. I do, however have lights and such set up for starting seeds indoors. I have also just thrown lupine seeds out in the fall and early spring and had great results from both.

superschwein22
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Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 3:09 am
Location: Attleboro, Ma

Thank you so much. I rerally like Lupines and didn't want to go without them in my garden. I guess experimenting is the trick here. I will try out all possibilities and see what works best.

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