trying2findmygreenthumb
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OOPS! I used a packet of last years seeds - will they sprout

I used a packet of last years seeds - will they still sprout?
The packet was not properly stored whih is my main concern. They are Danvers carrots. I found my new packet the next day after I already planted and watered. Should I start over?

Thanks for your help!
God made rainy days so gardeners could get the housework done. ~Author Unknown
Sunset Zone 24
USDA zone 10

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stella1751
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Last year, I planted five seeds that were at least six years old. All of them germinated, but two of the seedlings were really weird, like mutant seedlings. The seeds had been stored in various places, including the shed, so had endured temperatures ranging from probably 0 to 100 degrees. I think you will be fine 8)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

trying2findmygreenthumb
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Oops! I used a packet of last years seeds - will they sprout

Thank you Stella,
I get antsy! And I want to make the most of the sunshine too!
God made rainy days so gardeners could get the housework done. ~Author Unknown
Sunset Zone 24
USDA zone 10

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stella1751
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Here's a thought I had after I made my first posting: I have 8 Habanero seedlings right now grown from 8 2010 Habanero seeds I planted, for 100% germination on year-old seeds. Duh. Those were kept in the house, though, so the temperatures probably ranged from 70 to 80 degrees throughout the year.

The others I mentioned were really poorly stored and awfully old, so they are a better example. In fact, I have some of those seeds left and will probably try them next year. (I'm keeping them in the house now :) )
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

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rainbowgardener
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Give them a chance, they will most likely be fine!
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lakngulf
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rainbowgardener wrote:Give them a chance, they will most likely be fine!
I plant seed from one year, two year, ?? years back. Always wonder, "will they work". So far they always come up and do well. Some seed I keep in the refrigerator and some in a shoe box inside. Why the difference? Because I never take the time to get them all in one place. But this process has worked so I will probably keep doing it.
Nutin as good as a kitchen sink mater sammich

TZ -OH6
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Germination success declines with age so you will get a lower percentage of sprouts each year rather than all alive vs. all dead (so just overplant old seeds and maybe start a week early). How long they stay at a high germination percentage depends on the vegetable. I have heard that lettuce is pretty bad and you need new seed each year, but I used two year old seed this year and it worked. I have seen stats on corn where germination drops off after year three, which is a problem if you are direct sowing. Tomatoes are good for 5-10 years, and I've sprouted peppers bought from dried grocerystore chiles that sprouted after 7-8 years. Freezing some seed will prolong this.

True seed from potatoes have so much germination inhibitor in them that they will actually germinate better after sitting for a couple of years.

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