User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Recycled containers for seed starting and uppotting

:mrgreen: I like the idea of NOT throwing away things that can't be readily recycled -- i.e. that my limited municipal recycling won't take. At least not right away. :mrgreen:

I'm basing the depth of container on J. Jeavon's 3" deep for sowing seeds and 6" deep for most uppots. (Lettuce can stay in 3" deep). Filled with soil to the rim for better air circulation.

So I've been making seed flats out of milk and OJ cartons and ultra-pasteurized Rice Milk cartons, as well as corrugated cardboard boxes (well they take that, but I'm not giving away CCBs when they can be put in my compost pile afterwards.)

I found out that it's easier to cut open the Milk, OJ, and RM carton flats when it's time to uppot. Then the seedlings can be easily eased out.

For uppotting the seedlings, I'm finding that typical nursery pots that are cubular (if that's a word) in shape -- same height as width -- are shallower than I want. I'm liking the various sized drinking cups, yogurt containers (NOT Yoplait because they're upside down :(), and quart size deli containers because of the extra depth for deeper roots. The narrower shape saves space too.

Of course I have a lot of nursery containers from previous purchases as well. I like the square ones better because they hold more than round ones for the same width/diameter. I'm also experimenting with Chinese food pt and qt size paper containers. I use the deeper than wide (is there a geometry word for 3D rectangle shape?) containers for uppots and cubular ones for community seed starts. Depending on the kind of plant, I can pot them up in a group of 2 or 4. 2 on opposite corners or 4 in each corner, planting closer to the edge to minimize root entangling.

I'm also using 6" deep CCB's but it's harder to find drip trays for them. (Aluminum lasagna pan works well)

Plastic take out trays are useful as drip trays for smaller containers, and for elevating seedlings up to the light. Their lids are useful for that tiny bit more height, if you're micro-managing.

All these smaller containers provide a lot of flexibility when it comes to moving the seedlings about -- from the heating mat to the lights and shuffling around under the lights and eventually for hardening off.

Flip side is there is a fair amount of wasted space no matter how carefully you arrange them, but then again, this might not be entirely a bad thing because there is more air circulation between the containers and the plants.

What are your ideas?
Last edited by applestar on Tue Apr 26, 2011 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

Great thread, you know I do the same thing. I have all kinds of shapes and sizes of containers. Even beer/ soda boxes converted to planters.

I also found that sour cream containers fit perfect around the pots I got from the nursery to water the pots before transplanting. The SC containers catch all the excess water which than is recycled to water more plants and infused with whatever was in the potting soil. :wink:

AS said above I got a ton of planters from 3 inch to 7 gallon, even some flats from a couple of different nurseries. That is another great idea if you need pots. They just have them laying around a lot of the times. Even though there is a big garden pot recycling program around here ran by the Mo Botanical Gardens that doesn't mean they all get recycled. And a lot of city recycling programs will throw them out because they have dirt in them so I am reusing the instead of there possible life in a land fill.

Mad props to you Applestar and anyone who reuses their trash for helpful purposes.

p.s. don't forget egg cartons.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

I'm a big believer in reduce, reuse, recycle. Next time I need more pots, I will work on both Apple's method (use the sour cream and yoghurt containers) and gixx's (check the local nurseries, see if they will give me some). But in the meantime, I have over 300 3" plastic nursery pots, most of which I bought (people give me some). They cost me 20 cents each and some of them I have used for 15 years now...

Pretty good investment of 20 cents and I think it at least counts for reuse!

thanrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 720
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 2:01 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FLZone 9A

Instructables [url]https://www.instructables.com/[/url] has some newspaper seedling pots. Maybe four 'ibles with comments good and bad. I haven't produced any yet, although I have dabbled with a newspaper pot here and there. As in on vacation but want to take a seedling home, so very temporary. It's probably easier if you are making several at a time.

I like using the clear plastic containers with some depth as cloche or mini-greenhouses. The amount of plastic containers I have stockpiled is disturbing to me. A back room looks like a recycling center with all the cardboard and #6 plastic, and bins of sorted metals and glass against one wall.

I've grown things in the clear containers, too, but algae or something will start.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I liked the idea of tall square Origami newspaper pots, and tried making them from instructions I found on-line. The trouble is, I wasn't happy with the designs -- uneven thickness, too thick in some areas, extra flaps that needed to be taped or glued. They can be stored flat but then they have to be unfolded/opened up for potting -- not something you want to be doing with wet or dirty-with-moistened soil hands.

I felt that if I'm going to glue/tape, I might as well go with the super-easy wrap around an object, squash/fold the bottom, and tape/glue. So I've come up with my own Origami paper pot design. I made about 4 this morning, trying it out. It has single layer bottom for the roots to grow out easily, but has supportive multi-fold side corners and top edges for strength, and can be stacked unfolded/opened. I'll make a few more and try planting in them today.

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

About the reusing part of this and cloches, I have been saving milk bottles. they will be great I think (and hope). I plan on cutting the bottom of them off so they fit around the plant. Than you still have plenty of air flow due to the opening at the top, along with a warming effect.

Not to mention they are great to fill with water from the tap and let sit to de-chlorinate (before being cut obviously). I have about 20 gallons of water in my basement in various jugs of various sizes waiting to be used for starters. When the indoor season is over I will put them in my recycling bin and start over next year. All good for me and my mother, Earth that is.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Yup my baby cabbage plants are as we speak out there with milk bottle jugs over them as cloches. It's cool because in the evening I put the lid back on them to hold the heat in and in the AM I take the lid off for ventilation!

My garden always looks a little strange with poly-tunnel and milk jugs and later row covers and deer netting. MH (my honey) calls my raised beds (which remember are tallish wooden bases with the hoops and row covers) Conestoga wagons...

It would be prettier if I could just have the plants and not all the contraptions, but oh well....

Gerrie
Senior Member
Posts: 152
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:10 pm
Location: Southern Oregon

I've finally had to come to the conclusion after years of trying, that 'pretty' isn't possible in the beginning of the season. Thanks, Applestar for guiding me to this site, I hadn't seen it and now I've got plenty of ideas. I've been saving milk jugs all winter for clotches (sp.?) and those deep salad containers for stage two John Jeavons up-potting but I misjudged (by far) how many I would need. They are the right depth, about 5-6" but six of them isn't going to go very far...
The spiritual life is first of all a LIFE, it is meant to be lived-Thomas Merton

User avatar
Duh_Vinci
Greener Thumb
Posts: 886
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 1:58 am
Location: Virginia

Great tips, and important thread Apple!

I must say, than since I joined the forum, somehow I have become far more conscious of recycle, so I do my best. I do save all the milk jugs (we buy the screw top, those are very sturdy, and serve perfectly when I mix fertilizer for foliar feeding) as well as the protectors for the cold nights and fragile seedlings.

In the way, I'm lucky to have access to variety of "products" from the hospital where I work. Our intravenous contrast vials come packaged in individual plastic strips that imo are perfect for seedling starting:

[img]https://drphotography.smugmug.com/photos/754470826_mLb6G-L.jpg[/img]


And in the background - a very sturdy trays from saline syringes:

[img]https://drphotography.smugmug.com/Other/2009-Garden/2009seedgermination2/626178143_wTDVE-L.jpg[/img]

Those fit perfectly 16 3oz mouth wash cups for seedling starting or 9 3" pots. Also use them upside down to elevate seedlings closer to the light, and being white, with rolled lips - light reflection back to the seedlings is perfect.

I also re-use the ziplock bags from Espoma seed starting mixes for storing pre-mixed my own potting media.

In the winter, when there are no homegrown veggies - small clear boxes from tomatoes, berries and such - use them as "mini" green houses. I even save those plastic containers from Wawa hot dogs =) Perfect as mini germination chamber for small batches of seed.

And this one - laugh all you want, but it works... Windshield wiper blades - most packaging includes a clear long raised cover to display the product - well, this cover when turned upsidedown serves perfectly as a tray for 3oz cups to sit on the window sill with young seedlings:

[img]https://drphotography.smugmug.com/photos/809900583_vcU4h-L.jpg[/img]

So there are no issues with watering those little guys...

Regards,
D

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

:lol: :lol: This response would have been FAR more effective had I posted it when I had the impulse to, immediately after Gerrie wrote:
I've finally had to come to the conclusion after years of trying, that 'pretty' isn't possible in the beginning of the season.
What I was GOING TO SAY, was: You wouldn't say that if you've seen Duh_vinci's photos. But I couldn't find any suitable recycled seedling start photos of yours to illustrate my point. And now, here they are! :mrgreen: :wink:

Gerrie
Senior Member
Posts: 152
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:10 pm
Location: Southern Oregon

I think Duh Vinci has the same artistic talent as his namesake. I, alas, lack it.
The spiritual life is first of all a LIFE, it is meant to be lived-Thomas Merton

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Here are my containers in action including the my Origami Paperpots (lightfixtures were raised for better photo angle) --

Applestar's Origami Paperpots:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6516.jpg[/img]

Corrugated Cardboard Box seed flat and red drink cups in the mirror:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6522.jpg[/img]

Pudding, Whipped Creamcheese, and Berry Containers, and a long narrow CCBbox:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6525.jpg[/img]

Milk and OJ container seed flats:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6527.jpg[/img] [img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6528.jpg[/img]

Chinese Takeout containers and a yogurt cup:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6535.jpg[/img]

Gerrie
Senior Member
Posts: 152
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:10 pm
Location: Southern Oregon

That's fantastic, Applestar. It looks like enough plants to start your own forest! I like what you did with the cups and containers you saved and the paper ones you made. Does the print impact the plants at all? Let me know as time goes on how you like them. After reading your other post about containers, I looked around and found a package of plastic cups we bought for camping last summer, they worked real good for some of the transplants. I cut a hole in each cup bottom for drainage and filled them with damp potting soil and put the little seedlings in them, freeing up potting trays for tomato seeds and pepper seeds, both of which will need plenty of time. I think I'm doing a lot more than last year, but it still dosen't look like much. I've been taking some photos but I can't upload them onto the compooper since it no longer chooses to read the Xdcard-go figure.
The spiritual life is first of all a LIFE, it is meant to be lived-Thomas Merton

User avatar
Duh_Vinci
Greener Thumb
Posts: 886
Joined: Sun Apr 12, 2009 1:58 am
Location: Virginia

Gerrie wrote:That's fantastic, Applestar. It looks like enough plants to start your own forest! ...
Yes indeed! What a great use of space and recycled container material - admire!!! Great looking plants!

Regards,
D

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

This isn't a container but I should mention recycling the inside of chip bags for reflective material around, under, and above the seedlings:
:arrow: https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=112334

User avatar
froggy
Senior Member
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:54 pm
Location: Toronto, ON, zone 5a

Have any of you tried pop bottle propagators?

I found this when researching ficus cuttings....
[url]https://www.insideurbangreen.org/2008/04/recycled-pop-bo.htm[/url]l

so i followed a few links to here:
[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/greenscaper/sets/72157604735985648/[/url]

and here's how they are made:
[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/greenscaper/2519983658/[/url]

they look like a neat idea, only, i don't drink pop more than a few times a year... so i haven't had a chance to experiment with it since I found the instructions...
;)

User avatar
froggy
Senior Member
Posts: 269
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:54 pm
Location: Toronto, ON, zone 5a

Just found his whole thread on propagation:

[url]https://www.insideurbangreen.org/propagation/[/url]

Maybe that one's a bit more explanatory....
;)

Bobberman
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2437
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 3:31 am
Location: Latrobe Pa.

froggy wrote:Just found his whole thread on propagation:

[url]https://www.insideurbangreen.org/propagation/[/url]

Maybe that one's a bit more explanatory....
This is really nice thread. I hope more look at this and quit wasting good planting containers!!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

Bobberman
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2437
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 3:31 am
Location: Latrobe Pa.

That is a great idea since I go through 3 chip baga or more a week! The wrinkles in the bags disperse the light even better. Some baga have a white shiny inside which is also good. I will start collecting them! I will glue them on the back of a piece of old carpet or padding like 2 foot square for the wall or under the plant boxes! Cheap & SUPER!!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

Bobberman
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2437
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 3:31 am
Location: Latrobe Pa.

Here is another idea for the water or pop bottle. Clear is better! I took a water bottle and left the cap on but cut the top out like a boat! I filled it 1/3 with water and put my sweet potato in the container. Now I will see what happens with the two I have in seperate containers. Does the heat matter or the light? I put one above the ref.! The other in the window!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I tried making one out of a water bottle. This one is Desani and, to my surprise, had a pretty pressed pattern under the label. I planted a volunteer tomato plant that grew in a container along with some Holly Basil.
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image8375.jpg[/img]

It grew quickly -- I believe the narrow neck of the upper bottle encourages the roots to grow down. I diverged from the original instructions and didn't put the cap on because I didn't think the soil would fall out. Look how the roots just grew right out of the opening even though I pushed the upper part down tight onto the bottom part :lol:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image8376.jpg[/img]

Here's the same plant 1 week later:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image8379.jpg[/img]

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

wow, that grew fast!!!!

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28181
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Well... I do want to draw everyone's attention to the fact that the ROOTS grew fast and right out of the bottom. The top growth on this plant would be considered "leggy" due to insufficient light and/or too much compost=nutrients in the soil mix. As usual, these early volunteers that are not part of my main intentional tomato starts don't get optimum attention/care. :oops: :roll: :wink:

User avatar
M.Clark
Full Member
Posts: 42
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 9:30 pm
Location: Grand Rapids, MI

I have started using paper towel and toilet paper roll tubes for starting seeds. I collect them all winter, and cut the toilet paper tubes into ½ and the paper towel as close to a normal size as I can.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

M.Clark wrote:I have started using paper towel and toilet paper roll tubes for starting seeds. I collect them all winter, and cut the toilet paper tubes into ½ and the paper towel as close to a normal size as I can.
ROFL! I was JUST coming to this thread to post just that. this is what I want to do this year!

F0od
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:24 pm
Location: Arizonia

I don't have any pics yet, but a friend of mine wanted to have taquitos at his favorite restaurant. We ended up ordering to go, and heading over to a park nearby. We bought Dixie cups, and only used a few, so I took the rest home, and started Basil, Oregano, Cilantro, Marigolds, Lavender, and probably a few other things in them. Marigolds are looking fabulous, as is the cilantro, oregano, and marigolds. Only had one lavender come up, but I heard it's a bit tough to grow, so I'll take it as a success!!
We would not

FistulinaHepatica
Full Member
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Calgary, Alberta

This thread made me feel sooooo at home :lol: it's nice to know that are other gardeners out there using bottle-and-yogurt-pot-nurseries :lol:
The mighty Oak is just another lonely nut who stood its ground ...

Silverfish
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun May 29, 2011 3:33 am

seed starting with biodegradeable pots

I know it's been said here somewhere, but newspaper pots are by far the best recyclable pots and cheap/easy to make. I discovered these long ago from step by step instructions of this site:

https://www.bettaliving.org/DIY/Basic_plans/DIY_newspaper_pots.html[/img]

User avatar
Tilde
Green Thumb
Posts: 344
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Hurry-Cane, Florida USDA10/SZ25

What about cloth bags? I've been sewing up some little bags for a project for a local school and I thoguht about some of the old cotton teeshirts I have that are so threadbare and loved - sew them up into little bags to start seedlings.
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

User avatar
Tilde
Green Thumb
Posts: 344
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Hurry-Cane, Florida USDA10/SZ25

Holiday sugar shock is starting ... so I got a few cupcake trays from the break room for seed starters.

similar to these:

[img]https://4.bp.blogspot.com/_DhdOarRvdYY/TJfWwkDYOeI/AAAAAAAAAFk/usK-Dicji4Q/s1600/cupcakes+9-19-2010+612w.jpg[/img]

Glad I revisited this thread - I've got some extra cabbages and lettuces to get planted for winter and I can do the soda pop bottle thing to try them hydroponically on a small scale ...
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

User avatar
jnunez918
Senior Member
Posts: 191
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 11:07 pm
Location: Austin, TX

froggy wrote:Have any of you tried pop bottle propagators?

I found this when researching ficus cuttings....
[url]https://www.insideurbangreen.org/2008/04/recycled-pop-bo.htm[/url]l

so i followed a few links to here:
[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/greenscaper/sets/72157604735985648/[/url]

and here's how they are made:
[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/greenscaper/2519983658/[/url]

they look like a neat idea, only, i don't drink pop more than a few times a year... so i haven't had a chance to experiment with it since I found the instructions...
I tried 16oz water bottles but found it very hard to get the seedling out. I ended up having to cut down the bottles 2-3 not to ruin the root ball. I'll definitely keep 2liters for cloches.
Jennifer
Austin, TX Zone 8b

User avatar
floridahillnursery
Cool Member
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 12:44 pm
Location: Orlando Florida

apple stars pots

Applestar, those paper pots are too cool for school. :D

User avatar
floridahillnursery
Cool Member
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 12:44 pm
Location: Orlando Florida

recycled containers

We use recycled containers from plant and t.c. companies for our tomatoes in spring. I really hate throwing them out. :D


[img]https://i1145.photobucket.com/albums/o519/floridahillnursery/CIMG1810.jpg[/img]
These are the containers we use to start our vegies in. These are a week old and will be planted in spring (feb 25th) they are all heirloom var. these will be trimmed to vine. We end up giving 1/2 away to close friends.

[img]https://i1145.photobucket.com/albums/o519/floridahillnursery/CIMG1809.jpg[/img]
Some better boys we started back in November. These pupies will be full of tomatoes come spring 20-50 tomatoes each and 8' tall trimed to vine. My wife Angela makes some of the best salsa and tomato sauce. I like sitting on our swing and slicing them up with a little salt...
Last edited by floridahillnursery on Thu Jan 19, 2012 11:59 pm, edited 4 times in total.

Dillbert
Greener Thumb
Posts: 955
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2010 7:29 pm
Location: Central PA

paper egg cartons . . .

dozen size or 18 - count size.

works well for the 6-8 week crowd - by the end they're falling apart - no need to "extract" the seedling - ala peatpots, bury the whole thing.....

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

FHN,
Very nice! 8)
May I have a wider view of the seedling setup? :D Looks a little like my watering shelf.


Eric

User avatar
floridahillnursery
Cool Member
Posts: 93
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 12:44 pm
Location: Orlando Florida

Hello

Hi Eric, Sure I'll go snap a pict. This is our personal overwintering/seedling greenhouse. BRB

[img]https://i1145.photobucket.com/albums/o519/floridahillnursery/CIMG1814.jpg[/img]
150 + or - Heirloom tomatoes. We use Dosatron injectors with overhead irrigation our tray table is 4'. Sterile medium is a must. To the medium we add a Bio-organic full spectrum fertilizer w/beneficial microbes. All nutrients are introduced, this will help curtail any pathogens in what would be the soil. Tomatoes will almost jump out of the ground. :D

Down from that a little further we have grape cuttings rooting out. they seem to like the same enviroment.

Unikorn
Full Member
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:48 am
Location: south florida

neat ideas

wow that is so cool! I am totally going to raid my parents kitchen for soda bottles now for my seedlings :) That green house is awesome.
Sincerely, Unikorn

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

Ihave probably said it befroe in here. But don't forget asking your local nursery's nicely to get some of their overstocked used pots. I have gotten a ton that way.

Just came home with another 50 pots the other day. I am in constuction so if I am there when the landscapers are there I hit them up as well.

Garden_by_Faith
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:25 pm
Location: North West

Re: seed starting with biodegradeable pots

Silverfish wrote:I know it's been said here somewhere, but newspaper pots are by far the best recyclable pots and cheap/easy to make. I discovered these long ago from step by step instructions of this site:

https://www.bettaliving.org/DIY/Basic_plans/DIY_newspaper_pots.html[/img]
I wish I would have seen this just a day earlier...I just planted a bunch of seeds in newspaper pots. I did mine a little different. I found the idea on pinterest :) You take a tin can and use it to wrap the newspaper around into a cylinder, then you fold the bottom and tap it, then pull the can out. I will try the above link for my next batch of seeds :D
For I walk by faith not by sight

HonoluluGirl
Senior Member
Posts: 129
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:01 am
Location: Hawaii

I've been saving the coffe grinds from my Keurig K-cups then using the K-cups to start seeds. The Keurig coffee maker even punches a hole in the bottom of the K-cup when you brew the coffe.

After the coffee is brewed, if I want more holes, I turn the K-cup and punch more holes. I turn it a little, punch a hole, turn it again, and punch another hole and so on until I have enough holes.

Return to “Seed Starting Forum”