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luvthesnapper
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No Knead Bread

You guys ever made no knead bread? It's really good artisan style bread, with a minimal amount of work.

3 cups bread flour
1/4 tsp. active dry yeast
1 tbsp salt
1 1/2 cups warm filtered water

Wisk dry ingredients together in a large plastic bowl, and add the warm water. Mix with wooden spoon, until a wet dough is formed. Let sit for 18 hours, covered with plastic wrap.

After 18 hours, remove dough from bowl to a floured surface, smooth out to a single flat piece of dough, and fold back into ball. Fold top to bottom, then fold each side in. Cover with plastic, and let sit for 3 hours right where it is.

After 3 hours, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees, with a heavy round pot inside, with a lid. Cast iron, Pyrex, etc. It must have a lid, and be pre-heated in the oven to 500.

Once everything is hot, remove your cooking vessel from the oven, place your dough ball inside, and bake with lid on for 30 minutes, at 500.

After 30 minutes, remove from the oven, turn down oven to 425 degrees, take the lid off your cooking vessel, and put back in oven for another 15 minutes.

You're done. Remove from oven, let cool, and eat. It's good stuff.

If you buy your yeast like this here, you can make literally hundreds of loaves, at maybe 75 cents or so a loaf. Not counting electricity. Just keep it in the fridge, and it'll be fine for a year.

https://www.iherb.com/Frontier-Natural-Products-Active-Dry-Yeast-16-oz-453-g/30817

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rainbowgardener
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Sounds like a lot of work to me. You save the minimal work of kneading and ad 18 hrs of letting it sit time, pre-heating cooking vessel, long baking time with having to pay attention and deal with it in the middle...

Hope it's really good; I think I will stay traditional.

If you started this at 9AM, you would have to get up at 3AM to do the next step, so you have to think carefully about when to do it.
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luvthesnapper
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How is letting something sit, hard. lol You can let it go 24 hours, with no problem, if that's easier. I've made it at 12 hours, 18, 24, and it's good at all those times. The flavor simply gets better, as it sits longer.

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After 18 hours, remove dough from bowl to a floured surface, smooth out to a single flat piece of dough, and fold back into ball. Fold top to bottom, then fold each side in. Cover with plastic, and let sit for 3 hours right where it is.
When flat, is it rectangular and about how thick. Do you use a roller or just floured hands. Basically you are folding it in half and then into thirds. :?

Could you just cover it with the bowl on the 3 hour step?

Eric

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gixxerific
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Sounds easy to me though I have never made bread.

Yet another thing on my bucket list. 8)

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luvthesnapper
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When flat, is it rectangular and about how thick. Do you use a roller or just floured hands. Basically you are folding it in half and then into thirds. Confused

Could you just cover it with the bowl on the 3 hour step?


Yes, it's basically rectangular. Pat it out with your hands flat to maybe 1/2 inch, and just make it back into a ball again, by folding it in. Don't worry about it too much. It takes 30 seconds. You'll notice by this point it's super soft, and no roller is needed.

Yes, you can cover it with a bowl, a towel, plastic wrap, no big deal.

I just found this. He does it almost exactly the same way I do. I don't own a proofing bowl, so I just let it sit on the counter for the 3 hour rest. I don't think he covers his, for the 3 hour rest. I'm going to do a loaf with no cover in a plastic bowl for the 3 hours, and see what happens.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Azfz5_ApPPw&feature=related[/quote]

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it's one of our favs. the long proofing time develops a lot of flavor.
my take:

430 g bread flour
(I use King Arthur; may need to adjust slightly for other brands.)
345 g water
1 tsp dry yeast - instant or regular
2 tsp salt

mix, allow to stand at room temp (covered) 16 hours.

turn out on floured board; knead lightly & form into ball - dough is sticky and loose - so "ball" is a slight exaggeration.
cover and allow to rest 1-2 hours

preheat oven to 500'F
preheat oven proof pot with lid in oven.

bake 15-20 min covered
uncover, reduce temp to 450'F, bake another 15-20 mins

looks like:
[img]https://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/DilbertD/qtrtspBaked-1.jpg[/img]

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Dillbert wrote:it's one of our favs. the long proofing time develops a lot of flavor.
my take:

430 g bread flour
(I use King Arthur; may need to adjust slightly for other brands.)
345 g water
1 tsp dry yeast - instant or regular
2 tsp salt

mix, allow to stand at room temp (covered) 16 hours.

turn out on floured board; knead lightly & form into ball - dough is sticky and loose - so "ball" is a slight exaggeration.
cover and allow to rest 1-2 hours

preheat oven to 500'F
preheat oven proof pot with lid in oven.

bake 15-20 min covered
uncover, reduce temp to 450'F, bake another 15-20 mins

looks like:
[img]https://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/DilbertD/qtrtspBaked-
1.jpg[/img]
That's a nice looking loaf (ball) of bread and it looks to be pretty light in texture by the size of it for the amount of ingredients used.

What, if anything is used to help release the bread from the pot? Lightly oiled and floured?

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COMPLETELY OT, I know.:P I'm dying to know what that fuzzy leaf thing is in the photo. Looks kind of like mullein But does mullein leaf have a giant mid-rib quite like that? ... it also reminds me of lambs ears.... :()

The bread looks yummy, but I can't picture myself turning the oven on, let alone at 500° :shock: Can this bread be made in cooler weather when the house is in the low 70's or in the winter when the house is in low to mid 60's? :wink:

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applestar wrote:COMPLETELY OT, I know.:P I'm dying to know what that fuzzy leaf thing is in the photo. Looks kind of like mullein But does mullein leaf have a giant mid-rib quite like that? ... it also reminds me of lambs ears.... :()

The bread looks yummy, but I can't picture myself turning the oven on, let alone at 500° :shock: Can this bread be made in cooler weather when the house is in the low 70's or in the winter when the house is in low to mid 60's? :wink:
I'm thinking that green leafy thing is a pot holder to keep from burning your hands grabbing the pot handle once the bread is done.

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OHHH, I see it now! :lol: ... Too much time spend hanging around plant ID forum :oops:

Thanks, gumbo. Now I can let it go. :D

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>>What, if anything is used to help release the bread from the pot? Lightly oiled and floured?

nothing is used on the pot - it's preheated so as soon as the dough rolls in it 'sizzles'

it is important to let it cool after removing it from the oven - you'll see it pulls away from the sides a bit, about 10 minutes, then a simple invert and tap will cause the bread to "fall out"

preheating the pot means just that - I did once shortcut the preheat and wound up removing the loaf with a spoon.... not good . . .

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yup - it's a "sleeve" style pot holder - obviously one needs oven proof handles...

I bake bread more often in the winter that in the heat - had a good "rising" spot on top of the fridge but we got a new one. so instead of 16 hrs on the fridge I use roughly 24 on the countertop.

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had a good "rising" spot on top of the fridge
That's where mine is right now. I should be taking pics. I'll get one of the finished bread.

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I'm having a bad camera day. You get the idea though. Good crumb, nice color. I used a smaller pot than usual.

[img]https://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd154/tonytwotime_2007/SN852278.jpg[/img]

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>>used a smaller pot than usual

(giggle) I prefer something even smaller in order to get a more "square" slice, that's just me.

I've done it on a stone-under-bowl kinda thing, and in a form.
even made "rolls" of the dough.

anywhich way - it's a good easy simple recipe/technique.

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luvthesnapper
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Yea, I've baked it in a small rectangle pyrex dish, with a lid. Comes out more like a loaf. I have no idea where that dish is though.

I made some homemade dough conditioner, which I'm going to use on the next loaf. See if it makes a difference in the rise, or anything.

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luvthesnapper wrote:I'm having a bad camera day. You get the idea though. Good crumb, nice color. I used a smaller pot than usual.

[img]https://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd154/tonytwotime_2007/SN852278.jpg[/img]
Ok that picture got me I am starting some of this tomorrow! Crap now I have to buy an oven proof pot!

Now just picture some nice ham and cheese sticking out from between 2 slices of that !!!!!!

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[img]https://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j176/Johnfor3/nokneedbread3.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j176/Johnfor3/nokneedbread4.jpg[/img]

Well I have to say I love the way this turned out I have a second one setting right now with garlic in it!

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Looks great! Is that the actual pot you baked it in? It shrinks that much?

Mine has 1 more hour to go on first 16 hr proofing. 8). I used one cup rye which may or may not have been a good idea. I might add some fresh rosemary.

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applestar wrote:Looks great! Is that the actual pot you baked it in? It shrinks that much?

Mine has 1 more hour to go on first 16 hr proofing. 8). I used one cup rye which may or may not have been a good idea. I might add some fresh rosemary.
The pot was a bit biger than the bread but it does shrink away from the pot. I made one last night with garlic and it is so good you should have smelled the house!

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Ooh I have to try the garlic bread. Rosemary was voted down by the kids and they chose thomson and golden raisins (in rye bread :? )

I'll have to make another loaf when they are not here. 8)

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applestar wrote:Ooh I have to try the garlic bread. Rosemary was voted down by the kids and they chose thomson and golden raisins (in rye bread :? )

I'll have to make another loaf when they are not here. 8)
It was real good but I think next time I will use garlic powder instead of fresh garlic. Fresh garlic loses some of its taste when you cook it like this but the powder stays strong.

I did how ever eat way to much of it last night with butter on it!

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I did how ever eat way to much of it last night with butter on it!
There is that problem, Bread Addiction. I have no cure, just pass the butter. :)

Have you or can you use a cast iron dutch oven.

Eric

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If you follow the YouTube link,
https://helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=269062#269062
in the comments there is a list of other YouTube links where presumably they learned the technique. I think it's "Eric of Breadtopia" link -- in the longer video, he mentioned either temperature or baking time adjustment for cast iron Dutch oven. Sorry to be vague.

I used a 3 liter Kuhn Rikon heavy bottomed stainless -- I did flour the bottom after preheating before dropping the dough in. I was gratified that the finished bread just dropped right out. No sticking.

Also, I used the toaster oven which only goes up to 450° but it came out great! Half the loaf is already gone. :(). The raisins tasted great. :D

The trifold twice technique invites all kinds of possibilities as far as scattering on the flattened dough and on each folded surface. 8)

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DoubleDogFarm wrote:
I did how ever eat way to much of it last night with butter on it!
There is that problem, Bread Addiction. I have no cure, just pass the butter. :)

Have you or can you use a cast iron dutch oven.

Eric


Most of what I found on the net tells you to use the dutch oven I don't have one right now. My old one took a fall right on a rock around the camp fire and knocked the bottom right out of it!

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@Dillbert, what size is your copper saucepan? The 3L still came out flattened -- maybe 2-1/2" at highest point.
(yummy though :D)

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applestar -

I use the 18 cm = about 7 inch dia x 3.5 inches deep; domed lid.

this particular loaf I used a quarter tsp of FruitFresh (aka ascorbic acid / vit C) as a conditioner - it relaxes the gluten a bit and you get better loft.....

looks like
[img]https://i490.photobucket.com/albums/rr267/DilbertD/qtrtspBaked-1.jpg[/img]

oops , posted that already . . .

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Hi

I love this bread and have made many loafs. There should be several youtube videos that detail the process, search for bittmen and sulivan street bakery in NYC or no-knead bread.

Instead of using flour to work the dough, I use a glass work surface and lightly wet everything with water, much easier to work and clean-up.

Depending on your oven and baking pot, adjust times and temperatures, I use a rommertopfh (sp?) clay baking box and don't need to use the highest temperature in my oven. If I use my inserted temperature gage, I reach the recommended internal temp well before the recommended time has passed.

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Would love to make this for DH, but he has celiac's, is there a good tasting flour I can buy for him, so I can try this?
Any ideas anyone?

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>>over baked bottom

if the rest is "perfect" I'm guessing the pot is dark colored? cast iron mebbe?

dark, rough surfaces absorb radiant heat more readily; couple that with an exposed bottom heating element and indeed you can crisp a bottom to crunch real quick.

couple solutions available - with a little more detail we might be able to pin down the best solution.....

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Green Mantis wrote:Would love to make this for DH, but he has celiac's, is there a good tasting flour I can buy for him, so I can try this?
Any ideas anyone?
you mean gluten free flour? I think that is what people with celiac disease need is gluten free. Unfortunately the gluten is what holds the bread together. Without it you would probably need eggs or some other binder.

They do make gluten-free flours these days. This site has some nice gluten free bread recipes:

https://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/glutenfreebreads/tp/3goodglutenfreebreadrecipes.htm

I don't know that they are all no-knead, but if you scroll down there's a gluten-free Irish soda bread recipe that is probably pretty similar to what this thread has been talking about.
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rainbowgardener.....

Yes I meant glutten free flour. Thank you very much for that site. Looks very interesting.

All the glutten free items are "so" expensive to buy. Then apparently it tastes awful.

Just want something that tastes good. DDF's Ground Painted corn would be great, but can't get it here. :(

I'd like to try growing some, but don't have the room for enough of it.

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Re:

rainbowgardener wrote:Sounds like a lot of work to me. You save the minimal work of kneading and ad 18 hrs of letting it sit time, pre-heating cooking vessel, long baking time with having to pay attention and deal with it in the middle...

Hope it's really good; I think I will stay traditional.

If you started this at 9AM, you would have to get up at 3AM to do the next step, so you have to think carefully about when to do it.
Setting for 18 hours gives it sour dough bread flavor. If you don't want to wait mix the dough it takes 1 minutes. Let dough rise 45 minutes. Dump dough in a 500 degree cast iron pot with lid cook 30 min. Remove lid, lower heat to brown the top.

My cast iron pot is small for cooking beans over the camp fire, too small for bread. I need a larger pot but I don't want to pay $50 for one.

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Re: No Knead Bread

I forgot about this thread. The rolls I made today are “no knead”. Very wet shaggy dough, still sticky when you stretch and pinch into balls and arranged on parchment - lined baking sheet.

Baked in pre-heated 450°F oven, with a tray of hot water on bottom rack, but I lowered temp to 425 after 5 min, and finished at 325 for the last 10 min. Maybe because I’m using a convection toaster oven and not a full size
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Re: No Knead Bread

I like the spoon bread and Sally Lunn because they have been the easiest for me to make. I have tried to make sweet bread, but my bread always comes out a little raw if I knead it by hand. I have found a solution to that though. I have to cut my recipe, a lot.
If I use my mix master with the dough hooks, the bread though comes out a lot smoother and better with less toughening water added to it and a lot less work kneading by hand.
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