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Ozark Lady
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That sounds really good.
Plums are finally dwindling down. I haven't processed them, I just washed them, cut out bad spots and froze them, not even blanched!

And peaches aren't ready, so I get some free time, well sort of... blackberries are also ending. But, the elderberries are beginning to show lots of ripe ones!

I love relishes that go good with beans. I am looking forward to making piccallili if I can find the good recipe that I used for it, before the house fire! I think it is in Ball Blue Book, I need to go look.
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LindsayArthurRTR
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ya, it's in there. pg. 227 in the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving.

Just got a gallon of local blackberries and made jam with them. I used the powdered pectin jam recipe that came with the pectin. They were the biggest fattest berries I have ever seen and they were so sweet. I almost felt bad for making them into jam and distorting the flavor with all that sugar. I wasn't sure we were going to have enough for 2 batches cause DH and my mom (I would never :roll: :wink: ) kept walking by and sneaking them.

On the same day, from the same vendor I also got a bushel of White Nectar peaches. They are in their prime right now. I made peach chutney and jam with them. I need to go get some more and just can halves and maybe make some pickled peaches. They are popular here in SC, not sure about everywhere else. Peach moonshine is pretty common around here too, but I've never made any of that.

Canned 15 quarts of mixed tomato varieties and 1 quart of just yellow toms last night. Thinkin about making some tomato jam with the next bushel.

Whew!

Got those toms in the dehydrator tonight. Picture documented the whole process, will upload them tomorrow for your inspection! :wink: :()
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alenshowbrizz
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Every one just try to make my favourite dill pickles recipe.


4 cloves garlic (more if desired)
1/2 peck 3-inch cucumbers or picklers
hot red cayenne peppers
fresh dill weed (no substitutes)
14 cups water
1 cup canning salt
2 cups vinegar
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gixxerific
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Just love this thread, this forum, and you guy's/gals.8)

Just what I need for my first adventures into canning.

Keep them coming. :lol: 8)

Hopefully by this time next year I will be able to add some of my own.

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Ozark Lady
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My tomatoes are just beginning, I have several, but they are far from picking time.
However, my son grew alot of tomatoes, and he is getting overrun. So I got a bucket full last night. I am thinking, before we can eat that many fresh ones they will go bad, so I am getting out the dehydrator and washing it up, guess it goes into action today too!
My camera is out on loan so, no photos..
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Some pictures of this years cannings...

Green beans 8quarts and 12pints, pickles sliced and chunks 15pints. I've given some away at this point, but more to come. Second plantings are getting ready to boom.
[img]https://i895.photobucket.com/albums/ac153/LindsayArthurRTR/gardenandhousestuff250.jpg[/img]

from left to right, 7pints peach chutney, 11pints peach jam, 9pints blackberry jam
[img]https://i895.photobucket.com/albums/ac153/LindsayArthurRTR/gardenandhousestuff249.jpg[/img]

15 quarts of mixed crushed tomatoes and yellow tomatoes.
[img]https://i895.photobucket.com/albums/ac153/LindsayArthurRTR/gardenandhousestuff239.jpg[/img]

15 pints of sliced and chunked pickled cukes.
[img]https://i895.photobucket.com/albums/ac153/LindsayArthurRTR/gardenandhousestuff159.jpg[/img]
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Ozark Lady
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Wow, you have been busy.
My cucumbers are just getting to true leaf stage, as is the zuchini.
I guess that I had better get some dill planted!

I can't make pickles that are edible, but I can do relishes that work okay, some are as bad as the pickles, so I am not big on pickles or relishes, I just have little success with so many of them. And because of this I only grow a few cucumbers, and not in a hurry to do it.

I need to add that I simply do not like kosher, or bread and butter pickles, I don't care for the flavors or textures. So they may have turned out fine, I just couldn't get anyone to eat them. But, we don't buy them either, since we just don't like them.

And with that said, I don't do pickles, just a few relishes.
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LindsayArthurRTR
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I got LOADS of compliments on the jars that I sent out. Many ate them all in one or more days and are begging for more jars. My pickle recipe is a special one.(I shouldn't say my recipe because the old lady next door FINALLY gave it to me, after many years of begging and gifts in the form of veggies, fresh baked bread, and homemade cake squares and countless afternoons of hot tea. I had to bribe it out of her. That and maybe she realized it would die with her if she didn't share. She's in her 90's) It won a blue ribbon at the county and state fair every time she entered it. It really is good. It really is as simple as canning gets. Just cut, stuff, pour, and process, and wait! The type of cuke is important to texture. Pickling cukes work best IMO, though I made these with strait 8's and ashley's. I picked them small and young. They aren't mushy, quite crisp :() Younger cukes make crisper pickles. Just try it with one jar and discard the left over brine. That way you can try it with out wasting so many cukes.

Bread and butter pickles make me gag...but my DH LOVES them. So I make them for him. I haven't made any sweet pickles yet this year, but I will be making zucchini relish. It is a bit sweet, but I LOVE it in tuna, egg and chicken salad. It's also really good mixed with mayo for a quick tartar sauce on salmon patties and I like a spoonful of the relish stirred into oyster stew in the winter. Now I'm starving :()
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Ozark Lady
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The only cukes that I planted were Armenian burpless, I have seeds for the others, and have plenty of growing time left. Maybe I should try some pickling types too.

But, first I need to grow them... :roll:

I think that I need to plant some squash other than zuchini also, since I have alot of those seeds too.

And I have 4 beds that are ready for succession. 2 shouldn't be, but the brassicas and potatoes both succumbed to bugs.
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Great thread! I'm hitting the pickles hard right now. So far I've picked 55 pounds of cukes from 4 hills. :shock: I have 2 buckets of fermented deli dills going and put a gallon jar of lacto fermented dills in today to brine. Did a batch of hot mix, experimental so I'm not too sure about that recipe yet. Put in a batch of lime soaked sweet pickles today, they'll get canned up tomorrow.

The first bucket of deli dills has been soaking 2 weeks now, I just had to have a sample today, awesome! :D Nice and crisp, tangy with a little spicey heat to them.

I need to make bread and butters yet for DW, I'm not necessarily a big fan of them but she likes them.

I about forgot, I also made a batch of sliced dills too.

Lacto Fermented Dills

5 pounds of small cucumbers, unwaxed and unwashed. (fresh & crisp!) (2 to 4 inches long)
1/2 head organic garlic
3 dried sprigs of dill weed with heads
3 grape leaves or cherry leaves (optional)
1 cup unrefined sea salt
4 quarts water (filtered)
6 peppercorns (optional)
1 gallon glass jar or crock (Medalta crock # 3 will hold 5 to 10 lbs. of cukes)


Organic lactic acid fermented pickles

Organic Lactic Acid Fermented Pickles MORE PHOTOS


Soak (but do not scrub) cucumbers in very cold water for 5 minutes.Use hands to loosen any dirt.

Scald a very clean glass jar with boiling water. Place a grape leaf at the bottom and arrange cucumbers vertically in layers, inserting garlic cloves and dill weed here and there. Do not pack tightly.

Add salt to filtered or spring water and stir and dissolve. Pour brine over cucumbers and add peppercorns.

Cover with leaves and a plate and place in a cool, dark place to ferment.(Long cool fermentation creates the best tasting and best keeping dill pickles. Cover with lead-free ceramic plate and river rock on top. Cover the plate and rock with 2 inches of brine (water and sea salt). The cucumbers need to be completely submerged and weighed down, under plate and stone.

After 1 week, the cucumbers will be semi cured; some prefer them that way. However, it is only after 3-4 weeks that they become fully cured pickles (without pale areas, completely translucent green). Once a week scoop the scum (kahm yeast) that forms on top, and discard (unless you are using a Harsch crock pot that has a clever patented airlock water gutter, that prevents the scum from forming).

Pickles may be placed in smaller jars that are more convenient for storage. Scald 3 or 4 quart jars, pour off and strain pickling juice (discarding garlic and dill weed). Transfer pickles, fill quart jars with strained liquid, cover, and refrigerate.

The juice, or kvas, is never thrown out; it is used as a base for soups, borsch, or even salad dressing.

Naturally fermented pickles will keep easily for a whole year (they acquire more taste as they age). In the middle of winter they will light up your tastebuds and provide delicious fixin's for sandwiches, and keep your digestion happy.

LindsayArthurRTR
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DAAAAAAAAAAAAAaaaaaaaaaannnnng!

Now YOU'VE been busy!!! LOL!

Thanks for the recipe! I'm not brave enough to try this method yet. :shock: Definitely Skeered! But certainly interested.
The only cukes that I planted were Armenian burpless
I just planted some Armenian Yard-Long Cukes and also some asian seedless. I've never planted them before, but they seem fun and showy.

Are these armenians the same as yours?

EDIT: it also says on the package that both types are great for pickles?
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Ozark Lady
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I just looked them up, with the vendor, looks like they could very well be:
Armenian Cucumber
Long pale green, Thin skin no need to peel.

Planting: Plant 3-4 seeds 1" deep every 4'. To have cucumbers sooner start indoors about 4 weeks earlier than you could plant them outdoors, in 3" pots, 3-4 seeds per pot. Transplant a week after last frost and be careful not to disturb roots when transplanting. 60 Day.

That is all it says about it, not sure where I got the burpless, maybe on another cucumber that I have?

My hubby loves cucumbers, just raw, but they don't love him. I have cast iron digestion so none of them bother me.
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This one is awesome too!

Deli Dills

3/4 cup pickling spice
2-3 bunches of fresh dill, I use lots
10 pounds pickling cucumbers, trim the blossom end off about an 1/8 inch
1 1/2 cups pickling salt
2 cups vinegar, I use cider vinegar
16 cups water
6 garlic cloves, you can never have too much garlic!

In a large clean crock, glass or stainless steel container (I use buckets), place half the pickling spice and one bunch of dill. Add cucumbers, leaving at least 4 inches of space between cucumbers and the rim of the container.

In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine pickling salt, vinegar and water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve salt. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

Ladle pickling brine over cucumbers to cover. Place remaining dill and remaining pickling spice over the top of the cukes. Add garlic. Place a large clean inverted plate on top of the cucumbers and weigh down with two or three quart jars filled with water and capped. Cover with a clean heavy towel. Let stand in a cool place (70 to 75 degrees) for about 3 weeks, until cucumbers are well flavored with dill and clear throughout. Every day, remove any scum that has formed. During fermentation, gas bubbles will form. When bubbling ceases, fermentation is complete.

Stage 2
Prepare jars etc.

Drain pickles, reserving the brine. Set pickles aside. Strain brine into a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat and boil gently for 5 minutes.

Pack pickles into hot jars to within a generous 1/2 inch of top of the jar. Ladle hot pickling liquid into jar to cover the pickles, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe rim. Center lid on jar and screw the band down finger tight.

Place jars in canner. Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.

LindsayArthurRTR
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I picked the Armenian because it says they have a flavor and texture closer to honeydew melon! I will be interesting!!! I can't wait to swap stories!
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LindsayArthurRTR
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Wickles
Wicked Hot Zucchini Pickles

Makes 8 pints (wide mouth jars are prefered but I only had 1 so I used regular mouth jars too)


[img]https://i895.photobucket.com/albums/ac153/LindsayArthurRTR/gardenandhousestuff255.jpg[/img]

14 cups of Zucchini (spears or chunks or sliced) I remove the seeds and seed pith
1/2 cup kosher salt
Cool water

Layer zucchini with salt in a bowl or clean sink. Just cover, with cool water. Let stand for 2 hours.

6 cups white vinegar
4 cups granulated sugar
4 tsp mustard seeds
2 tsp celery seeds
2 tsp ground turmeric
2 tsp pickling spice (optional)
3 hot ripe peppers (optional)

Bring the above 7 ingredients to a boil in a very large non-reactive pot. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. During that time drain, rinse, and re-drain the zucchini pieces. After 5 minutes of simmering the brine, add the zucchini and stir to coat. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 hour.

Prepare canner, jars, and lids.

Pack the zucchini into jars tightly, but don't crush them. Bring the syrup back up to boiling and boil for 5 more minutes. Pour the hot syrup into the filled jars to 1/2 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust the syrup back up to 1/2 inch headspace. WIPE RIMS and place lids and bands to fingertip tight.

Place in canner with water completely covering the jars. Bring water back to the boil and process for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.

These are a sweet but tart pickle and they are spicy. Not like a bread and butter pickle, they are more sour and have a bit of a mustardy flavor. I used zucchini, but you can substitute cucumbers. This is a great way to use up mass quantities of squash and zucchini from the garden. And wear rubber gloves while you are packing your pickles otherwise, you'll have yellow stained fingers :()
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Tomato Sauce

NEEDS PRESSURE CANNED

Makes 6 pints

60 Roma tomatoes, halved and seeded (about 19 pounds ;) )
1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon pepper
3 cups finely diced onion
2 tablespoons minced garlic (optional)
3 tablespoon finely chopped oregano leaves (optional)
3 tablespoon finely chopped thyme leaves(optional)
3 cup white wine

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

If you want an italian style sauce use the herbs, if you just want a plain tomato sauce you can omit the garlic and herbs, but still use the onion.

In 2 (13 by 9-inch) pans place tomato halves cut side up. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, onion, garlic, and herbs. Bake tomatoes for 2 hours. Check the tomatoes after 1 hour and turn down the heat if they seem to be cooking too quickly.

Prepare canner, jars, and lids.

Then turn the oven to 400 degrees and bake another 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and process tomatoes through a food mill on medium dye setting over a large saucepan. Discard skins. Add white wine, bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and cook for 15 minutes. cook less for a thinner sauce and longer for a thicker sauce.

Ladle hot sauce into hot jars. leave a 1 inch headspace. Remove bubbles and adjust headspace back to 1 inch with more sauce. WIPE RIMS with a paper towel dipped in vinegar to remove any food partices. Place lids and bands on jars and tighten to fingertip tight.

Place jars in canner and adjust water to 2-3 inches up the side of the jars. Jars do not need to be covered with water. Lock lid into place and bring them to boiling. Let the pot steam vent for 10 minutes then place 10 pound weight onto vent. When the weight starts rocking reduce heat to maintain roacking and start time. Process for 15 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.

When time is up, turn off heat. do not remove weight until rocking has stopped. Remove the weight once it stops rocking. When steam stops and pressure is normalized, remove the canner lid. Let jars sit for 5 minutes, then remove from the canner. Cool, check for seal, then wipe jars clean and store.
Last edited by LindsayArthurRTR on Sun Jul 25, 2010 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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gixxerific
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That what I need Lindsay.

So how many pounds roughly would 60 romas be? My romas aren't doing so well. But I have others I was going to use.

Another question do you go and pick 60 romas at a time or pick them here and there and freeze them till you have enough?

By the way that was a pretty good job at explaining all the necessary steps including the canning process.

LindsayArthurRTR
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I have 12 roma plants, Well 6 amish paste and six of another plum variety, so I have no trouble getting 60 of em.

I just weighed like 6 of them and they averaged 5 ounces. Sooooo...

5oz x 60 tomatoes=300oz of tomatoes.

300 oz of tomatoes / 16 oz per pound=18.75 pounds of tomatoes.

Soooo...If my calculations are correct (I hope) you'll need about 19 pounds of tomatoes for this recipe. which just so happenes to fill up a half bushel basket!

I would not freeze them. The ice crystals produced during freezing will pierce the cell membranes. When you thaw them, you'll have a watery, mushy mess. I would refridgerate them until you have enough to use :()

I would definitely substitute other types of tomatoes, so long as you have the same poundage of tomatoes! Yellow tomatoes would make a beautiful sauce!!! Acidity is not an issue here, because you're pressure canning.

Thank You Gixx :()

EDIT!!! and that is pounds of WHOLE tomatoes.
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I think my Jalapenos have enough peppers on them to start thinking about that [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=146051#146051]Hot Pepper Jelly[/url]. I won't have 20~30, but I could maybe manage 10~15. But I had a thought -- right now, I have a lot of green apples on my Enterprise Apple tree (ripens late Sept~early Oct) . Could I use some green apples instead of pectin? Or is this the kind of substitution you shouldn't attempt? What if I don't can it but keep in the fridge and eat within a couple of weeks?

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IDK. I wouldn't keep them at room temp that way, but I would DEFINITELY do it and keep it in the fridge :() It may change the flavor! Which is AWESOME! You could substitute green or red bell peppers. And you might have bigger peppers than me, so your 10-15 peppers might make 2 cups of chopped peppers! You could substitute any pepper or chile for the jalapenos so long as your final chopped pepper amount is 2 cups. I usually don't make it with all jalapenos, cause it is HOT AS HELL! I usually do one cup chopped japs and 1 cup chopped bells.

If you use the apples you may have to cook the crap out of them, which may also change the flavor of the final product.
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I'm saving up jalapenos for jelly myself. Too bad this is the first year I only planted one instead of a bunch. So let us know how it goes Apple if you get there before me.

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I only have 2 plants that made it, but they are loaded! and many are turning red!!! I am going to use only ripe jalapenos and ripe bells for my jelly! I will omit the green food coloring, too. It should make for a beautiful spread!
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Can I can tomato sauce in used spaghetti jars?

I know this may be a crazy question to ask but can I reuse spaghetti jars for canning my tomato sauce? I only would like to make about 4-5 jars worth of sauce and I would use it within a few months time. I probably won't be canning anything so that is why I would like to recycle these jars that I have. Any advice? :?
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I would not suggest that :( . The seals of the lids may not seal properly, being that they were previously used. It could make you or your family very VERY sick. I would use Ball, Kerr or Mason jars, lids and bands only for long term, room temperature storage. I always use new lids everytime! I'm sure there are some differing opinions on this matter. I watched my grandmother make grape jelly in mt. olive pickle jars for years, but she would always keep them in the fridge, and not at room temperature. Which IMHO kinda defeats the purpose of canning. :roll: If you are going to use it up relatively quickly, I would suggest freezing it in ziptop bags.

Canning Jars come in all sizes and can be reused as long as you use new lids. They are also relatively inexpensive compared to disposable ziptop freezer bag costs accumulated over years. Canning is super easy to do and it's a super cost effective preserving method compared to freezing. If you buy 12 jars, you can fill them and reuse them forEVER as long as they don't chip or crack :() You do need new lids every year, but the bands can be reused too!
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Some commercial sauces come in what looks like canning jars and the regular canning jar lids and bands fit them. I wonder if those could be re-used if you buy new lids and bands.... Before I started buying organic pasta sauces, that was the kind I used to buy, and I still use the old jars (and the old screw on lids) for dry goods storage.

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@ applestar: the highest concentrations of pectin are found in the skin/peel and the core of those green apples. If you want to use them as an alternate source (in an experimental way) of pectin, you'll increase the odds of success by focusing on the peels and core. I'm sure *someone* in your house will be happy to help with the "extra" apple chunks! :D

@ gardengrl3: Your question isn't crazy at all. Some pasta-sauce jars *are* rated for canning. They have markings and everything on them. But don't use plain lids, even on these jars. Use the safe canning lids, the two-part ones. But, for your first time canning, I would say not to use even the pasta-sauce jars rated for canning. Use equipment and supplies known to be correct while you're learning the safe way to do things. It removes one source of stress. Do not improvise as a beginner, especially with safety requirements. Later, as you gain experience, you may want to play around with ingredients, like Applestar is doing, but the safety will still be critical.

If you want to make a small batch, that's fine! One "batch" in my canner holds 7 jars, no matter what their size. There are only 7 parking places in the canning rack. Four or five jars, then, would be most of a batch. And, if you want to freeze the sauce, you will again want to use--yes--canning jars. They're tempered for both heat and freezing, and thus are recommended either way. When I've needed to "put up" food and haven't been up to standing for long enough to do canning, I've punted and frozen the food (praying for no power outages...). My canning jars, therefore, have never stood idle for very long! :D

I wrote a post the other day with my "three rules of canning" in it. Since then, I've found some recipes from my first couple of years canning. I am *stunned* *gobsmacked* *staggered* to find that I've been canning for 25 years. Self-taught from books, including pressure canning, but really if you follow the directions carefully and give yourself time the first couple of go-rounds, it will come together for you quite safely and happily.

Cynthia H.
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LindsayArthurRTR
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cynthia_h wrote:Often, heirloom varieties are more acidic than modern hybrids, although to what extent I can't say and refuse to rely on. Regardless of the varieties I've canned or made products (e.g., spaghetti sauce) from for canning, I have always added lemon juice or citric acid powder to the tomatoes / sauce before canning them. We want acidity in hot-water canned products. This is what provides the safety margin for non-pressurized canning: acidity. Low pH.

On the subject of canning (and this is mostly for those new to the practice or wanting to try it out):

I learned from books. This means that you can learn from the web and from books, too. No one I knew canned or even knew anyone else who did when I was faced with a friend's tree absolutely laden with cherry-sized plums way back when.

Rule #1 of Canning: There is no such thing as "too safe" when home-canning foods.

Do not improvise your own cooking times or preparation methods. Do not take chances with the safety of your family or friends. If you can afford to purchase only one canner *and* can afford a pressure canner, do so. Both kinds of canning (hot-water bath and pressure canning) can be performed in a pressure canner; the reverse is not true. I got along with a hot-water canner (also referred to as a "baine Marie") for several years before I felt comfortable enough to look for a pressure canner, but the web wasn't around then, and printed info on pressure canning wasn't all that encouraging.

Now it's different; there is a TON of information, but not all of it is reliable. Unfortunately. Know your sources. The Ball Blue Book is excellent; the USDA extension nearest your home is also excellent.

I can tell you that I have experience, but I will also tell you that I am *not* experienced in canning at elevation or in canning meats. I have also not done much canning of quarts; most of what I've canned has been jelly-sized jars, 12-oz. jars, pints, and 1.5-pint jars. Each of these has a *different processing time* which is dependent on its size and on your elevation. Find out what that processing time is from a reliable source: again, the Ball Blue Book or the USDA.

Rule #2 of Canning: There is no such thing as "too clean" when home-canning foods.

Even after years of experience, I still demand almost hospital-like sterility from my jars, flat lids, and screw-on bands. I want my food hot hot hot when it goes into the jars, my water boiling, and my jars / flat lids sterile (or as sterile as I can get them). My own hands are clean clean clean. I do not touch my hair or my face while working with the jars. If I do, I wash my hands again before touching a jar.

If you have a dishwasher, you're golden: put the jars and the screw-on bands on a good, hot cycle as you're getting the food ready for canning. Turn the dishwasher on. The jars and screw-on bands will wait for you. Hand-wash, in soapy hot water, the flat lids. Yes, even if they *just* came brand-new out of the box. Rinse them well. Have a bowl or small pot into which you can lay them without them sticking to one another. I turn them alternately right-side-up and upside-down. Then pour boiling water over them. They will also wait for you.

Now your equipment is good and clean.

Prepare/cook the food, fill the jars per your recipe (head space varies, depending on what you're canning), and make very sure there are no particles of food on the rim of the jar. Place the flat lid on the rim of the jar and a screw-on band over the lid. When you have a rack of jars filled (usually 7 jars) *and* the water is boiling, place the jars into the water. There should be enough water to cover the jars by 1 inch when the water is boiling.

Rule #3 of Canning: Follow established procedures, and you will get it right the first time.

After the prescribed processing time has elapsed, use the "jar-lifter" and place each jar carefully onto a folded towel which has been set in place out of drafts. This is where the jars will cool, probably overnight. My best counter for this cooling is next to the stove but also next to the window, so I close the window *sigh* when the processing time is almost up. After all my work, I do not want a jar to crack....

There's a nice "ping" sound when the lids invert. Count these pings; you'll know whether all the jars sealed or not. If any did not seal, those go into the refrigerator for eating in the near future; do not put them in long-term room-temp. storage.

And feel good about yourself!

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

I think this is a great post! :()
"The conspicuous consumption of limited resources has yet to be accepted widely as a spiritual error, or even bad manners." ~Barbara Kingsolver

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LindsayArthurRTR
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Plum Butter

Makes 6 8oz jars


12 cups pitted chopped plums
1 cup water
4 cups sugar (or to taste)
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cloves

In a large non-reactive pot, simmer plums with water, covered, over medium heat for about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally.

If you don't want skins, pass them through a food mill with medium dye. If you like skins (I think it's pretty with dark skins) just process to a puree in a food processor.

Prepare water canner , jars and lids.

return the puree back to the cooking pot. Stir in the sugar and simmer over medium-low heat stirring constantly for 30-40 minutes until the mixture is thickened. Stir in the spices and cook for 5 more minutes. Mixture is thick when it mounds on a spoon. Turn off the heat.

Spoon the hot thickened butter into hot prepared jars.. Leave a 1/4 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace back to 1/4 inch with more mixture. WIPE RIMS. place lids and bands and tighten to fingertip tight.

Process jars in boiling water for 10 minutes. When time is up, turn off heat and remove cover. Let stand for five minutes, them remove jars.

Cool, wipe and store.
"The conspicuous consumption of limited resources has yet to be accepted widely as a spiritual error, or even bad manners." ~Barbara Kingsolver

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LindsayArthurRTR
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Honeyed Peach and Blueberry Compote

Makes about 7 8oz jars

5 cups peaches peeled and sliced
5 cups blueberries
1 cup orange
2 cups sugar
1 cup honey (IMO, darker honeys are too strong for this kind of recipe. so, use a lighter honey like clover or wildflower)
1/3 cup lemon juice
1 cinnamon stick broken in half.

Prepare waterbath canner, jars and lids.

In a large non-reactive pot, combine the peaches, blueberries and orange juice. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the rest of the ingredients and continue cooking, stirring constantly for 15-20 minutes until the sauce is slightly thickened.

Fish out and remove the cinnamon stick and turn off the heat.

(if you want something a little more special, you can add 1/4 cup of peach schnapps or brandy at this point. Just stir it in right after you turn off the heat.)

Ladle the hot mixture into hot jars with 1/4 inch headspace. Remove bubbles and readjust headspace to 1/4 inch with more sauce. WIPE RIMS. Place lids and bands and tighten to fingertip tight.

Process jars in boiling water for 10 minutes.

Turn off heat and uncover, let jars sit in water for 5 more minutes. Remove jars from water and cool. Wipe jars clean and store.

This stuff is AWESOME on cheesecake!!!
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LindsayArthurRTR
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Old Fashioned Tomato Ketchup

makes 6 8 oz jars

2 3 inch cinnamon stick broken in half
1tsp whole cloves
1 tsp whole alspice
2 Tbsp mustard seeds
1 tsp celery seeds
10 pounds of ripe tomatoes (plum, bells, and roma work best but you can use any kind)
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 1/2 cups apple cider vinegar
1 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 Tbsp salt


Quarter the tomatoes and combine them with the onion and peppers in a large non-reactive pot. Bring to a boil over medium heat and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring accasionally. Remove form heat and press through a sieve or a food mill. Discard the seeds and skins.

Put the cinnamon, cloves, alspice mustard and celery seeds into a cheesecloth bag and tie the top tight with string.

Prepare waterbath canner, jars and lids.

Return the tomato mixture to the pot and add the spice bag and the remaining ingredients. Simmer the sauce for about 1 hour or until it gets thick (like ketchup hehe) Stirring occasionally for the first 40-45 minutes, then stirring constantly for the last 15-20 minutes. This will help prevent scorching.

When desired consistency is reached, turn off the heat, remove the spice bag. Ladel the hot ketchup into hot jars leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Remove bubbles and adjust headspace back to 1/2 inch with more sauce. WIPE RIMS. Place lids and bands onto jars and tighten to fingertip tight.

Process in boiling water canner for 15 minutes. when time is up. turn off the heat and uncover the canner. Let jars sit in water for 5 more minutes, then remove them from the canner. Cool, wipe and store!
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hit or miss
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Jalapeno Jelly, the recipe in the BBB is as simple as it gets! Only takes 3/4 pound of jalapeno's for a batch. I usually do a double batch without any problems setting up. I have substituted anaheims when I have had a shortage of jalapeno's without causing any problems either.

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Lindsay, I'm loving this thread full of your recipes :D
One request, though... could you post Serving suggestions? I think you did will a few and that helps IMMENSELY with things I never tried before.

Too often, I'm thinking "Hmm that sounds pretty good (or delicious!), and do-able, but... what the heck do you eat it with?" :lol: For example, I have a jar of pickled watermelon rinds I made last year sitting in front of me. (I was reorganizing the cupboard) I haven't opened it because I've NO CLUE what to do with it. :roll:

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applestar
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I made the Jalapeno/hot pepper jelly! :-()
Spent about 5 minutes licking the spoons and scraping the pot as well as the canning funnel and anything else the jelly stuck on enough to scrape up. :>

"Luckily" about 1/3C didn't fit in the canning jars -- promptly finished off at least half of that. Tried on crostini with cream cheese as suggested, also tried with aged Gruyer (my favorite cheese). MMmmm, mmm, mmm!

You did say it was addictive. 8)

I used all the different hot peppers -- Jalapenos, Cubanelle, Anaheim, Fish, Czech Black, even Royal Black. Also used some sweet bells (Quadrato d'asti) and Aji Dulce. Most were green with some breaking color, few red hot red. Looks really good in the jars with the red pieces hinting heat, along with a few seeds that made it in. I made applesauce from one small green apple, then added all the other ingredients. I hadn't paid attention to the amount of sugar in the recipe until I was actually making it, so I managed to use up all the sugar in the pantry. :roll: (Why does so many canning recipes call for so much sugar? I'll have to look into other kinds of preserving methods.....)

Still, it was DELICIOUS! No heat while eating, but some mild warmth developed in the mouth afterwards. Definitely worth making. I made 1/2 the recipe and filled 7 4 oz jars. :()

LindsayArthurRTR
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I made the Jalapeno/hot pepper jelly!
Spent about 5 minutes licking the spoons and scraping the pot as well as the canning funnel and anything else the jelly stuck on enough to scrape up.

LMBO! I'm glad I'm not the only one who does that. It IS especially bad with pepper and blackberry jelly!!

Will be making pepper jelly on Saturday. Gonna try it with all reds :) even though some of my ripe "Hals" have blackened a bit on the vine.

I am SO glad you like it!

I have acquired 2 grocery bags FULL of brown turkey figs that are going to have to be dispatched in some sort or fashion. I'm thinkin fig jam. I made some out of blue book recipe last year, but it wasn't like, WOW or anything. I tried a store bought fig jam with orange and it was CRAZY GOOD. Like, fig crack!!! So I need to find a recipe for that. I ate the whole dang jar in just a couple of days! On buttered bisuits of course :()

Here are a few suggestions for the recipes:

Ketchup: Everything savory. I LOVE it in oyster stew.
Peach and blueberry compote: sweet & saucy really good on Cheesecake or icecream or puddings.
The Fruit Butters: i like to make sandwiches with peanut butter and fruit butter. or buttered toasts and biscuits (especially biscuits...drool)
Chutneys are awesome of grilled meats and fish.
Tomato jam is also good on meat and fish but is also good on buttered biscuits or english muffins.
Pepper jelly is good on almost everything!!! but IMO best with crusty bread and cream cheese or cream cheese and wheat crackers..Once you start eating it..it's pretty much over.
The pickles and relishes are good chopped and mixed in with canned meats like tuna or with roasted meat salads like chicken salad.
Relishes like the red root relish are good on beans or rich fish stews.
Tomato sauce can be used in any way a normal canned sauce is used. Pasta, pizza, stuffed bells, really infinite possibilities.

The Wickles I will do differently next year. For 1, they are to pumpkin pie spice tasting. I will omit the pickling spice. and 2, they aren't too wicked, they need more OOmph! More HOT peppers!!!! They are a sweet pickle. People down here like to eat sweet pickles chunked up in fish stes and chopped fine in tuna, chocken, and egg salads. Phill just eats them right out of the jar. I don't particularly care for sweet pickles. But I like Wickles, as long as they live up to the wicked part.

I also have a great recipe for apple and gingered pear butters that I want to share. If I find a suitable fig recipe, I'll post that too. Right now, most call for adding Jello to the mix. Can't do that cause of my mom's vegetarian status. We'll see! Anyone know of any recipes for orange scented fig jam? That don't have Jello! Dalmatia makes the fig jam I am referring to (and GAH is it good!)
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LindsayArthurRTR
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APPLE! I was searching recipes for mint and I came along this one!!! It's right up your alley! I can't wait to try it, too!

Mint Jelly

Makes 4 8oz jars

The tarter the apples, the more pectin they will usually have. If you are using home picked apples, earliest in the season is best, and the smaller apples will have proportionally more pectin as well.

Ingredients
4 lbs of tart apples, unpeeled, chopped into big pieces, including the cores (including the cores is important as this is where most of the natural pectin is)
1 1/2 cups of fresh mint, chopped, lightly packed
2 cups water
2 cups white vinegar
3 1/2 cups sugar (7/8 cups for each cup of juice)
4 drops green food color is optional. looks like apple jelly otherwise.


Combine apple pieces with water and mint in a large pan. Bring water to a boil then reduce heat and cook 20 minutes, until apples are soft.

Add vinegar, return to boil. Simmer covered, 5 more minutes.

Use a potato masher to mash up the apple pieces to the consistency of thin apple sauce.

Spoon the apple pulp into a couple layers of cheesecloth or a large, fine mesh sieve, suspended over a large bowl. Leave to strain for 2-4 hours. Do not squeeze. Note that if your mash is too thick, you can add 1/2-1 cup more water to it. You should have 4 to 5 cups of resulting juice.

Prepare water canner, jars and lids.

Measure the juice, then pour into a large pot. Add the sugar (7/8 a cup for each cup of juice). Heat gently, stirring to make sure the sugar gets dissolved and doesn't stick to the bottom of the pan and burn.

Bring to a boil. Cook for 10-15 minutes, using a metal spoon to skim off the surface scum. Continue to boil until a candy thermometer
shows that the temperature has reached 8-10°F above the boiling point at your altitude (boiling point is 212°F at sea level, so at sea level the temperature should read 220-222°F). Additional time needed for cooking can be anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour or longer, depending on the amount of water, sugar, and apple pectin in the mix.

Candy thermometers aren't always the most reliable indicators of whether or not a jelly is done. Another way to test is put a half teaspoonful of the jelly on a chilled (in the freezer) plate. Allow the jelly to cool a few seconds, then push it with your fingertip. If it wrinkles up, it's ready.

Pour hot jelly into hot canning jars leaving 1/4" headspace. WIPE RIMS. place lids and bands and tighten to fingertip tight.

Process in boiling water canner for 5 minutes. Ensure jars are completely covered with boiling water. Turn off heat and remove cover. Wait 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner. Cool wipe and store.


Serve with roasted lamb, beef or chicken. Or with cream cheese and crackers. Or on buttered biscuits! YUM
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applestar
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Your timing is impeccable! :wink:

Just this morning, I picked new-fallen apples and "bruised" apples.
My Enterprise apples are suffering from brown rot, but I found out that if I catch it early, I can cut out the small portion of affected parts and the rest of the fruit is perfectly usable for green apple recipes.

I have 1/2 of a gallon zip bag full of saltwater soaked green apple pieces in the fridge, ready to use. :()

LindsayArthurRTR
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Here is the recipe for figs I am going to try. I found it on Saving the Season's website. I am going to alter the recipe somewhat, but the basic recipe is posted below.



FIG PRESERVES WITH HONEY AND WILD AROMATICS

makes about 5 8oz jars

2.2 pounds (1 kg) black mission or brown Turkey figs, about 6 cups halved
4 cups (800 g) sugar
1/2 cup sage honey
1/2 teaspoon or more wild fennel seed
3 California bay leaves
zest from one lemon
juice from one lemon


Trim the stem end and the tiny button on the flower end off of the figs. Halve for measurement purposes if working by volume, then quarter for cooking.

Layer figs, sugar, honey, lemon juice, and wild aromatics in a bowl. Cover and macerate overnight.


Put entire contents of bowl in a pot and heat over medium heat . I added the lemon zest at this point, but in the future would try adding it towards the end of cooking. Bring to a full boil and skim. Moderate heat and continue skimming, gently stirring or shaking to prevent figs from sticking to the pot and scorching. About 10 minutes cooking should reduce it sufficiently. Ladle into jars and process in boiling water for 10 minutes.

Here is how I am going to make the jam. I was looking for recipes with orange and honey but I couldn't find anything, but this one is close and it is easily altered because it doesn't include any added pectin.


Gonna call it

Orange Scented Fig and Honey Jam

2.2 pounds (1 kg) black mission or brown Turkey figs, about 6 cups halved
4 cups (800 g) sugar
1/2 cup wildflower or orange blossom honey
zest from one orange
1/2 cup orange juice

Trim the stem end and the tiny button on the flower end off of the figs. Halve for measurement purposes if working by volume, then chop coarsly for cooking.

Layer figs, sugar, honey,and orange juice. Cover and macerate overnight.

Prepare canner, jars, and lids

Put entire contents of bowl in a pot and heat over medium heat . Bring to a full boil and skim. Moderate heat and continue skimming, gently stirring or shaking to prevent figs from sticking to the pot and scorching. About 10 minutes cooking should reduce it sufficiently. with a potato masher, mash all the ingredients in the pot. Continue cooking over medium low heat until mixture sheets off of a spoon or you can check its consistency on a frozen plate. When desire thickness is reached Ladle hot jam into hot jars. WIPE RIMS. place lids and band on jars to fingertip tight. Ensure jars are completely covered with boiling water and process in boiling water for 10 minutes. Turn off heat and remove canner cover. Let stand 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner. Cool, wipe, and store
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LindsayArthurRTR
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For example, I have a jar of pickled watermelon rinds I made last year sitting in front of me. (I was reorganizing the cupboard) I haven't opened it because I've NO CLUE what to do with it.
What's that taste like? Like dill pickles, or are they sweet? Did you keep the skin on em? Are they crunchy like water chestnuts? What's your recipe?


Made the pepper jelly tonight!! It turned out beautiful with the all reds. I had more Jalapenos than I thought! I made 2 batches and I only had to put in 1/2 cup of chopped sweets (I grew marconi's, so that's what I used.) with the 3 1/2cups of chopped jalapenos! Mine is SCREAMIN hot!!! I got 14 8oz jars exactly with 2 batches of this recipe. 7 8oz jars with each batch. It set up really nice and firm too!

So hot it made my cheeks blush :() :oops:
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I actually decided there's no point in staring at the pickled watermelon rinds in the jars, so I opened a one and tried it with pork chops. It was delicious. :() Sweet and sour? Kind of like Bread and Butter but different. No skins. These were not crunchy but soft and slippery. Are they supposed to be crunchy?

I'll have to dig up the recipe.

:lol: I can't imagine processing/canning that much all at once. I think I would be overwhelmed. It's less intimidating to make small, manageable batches. :wink: I canned two 12 oz jars of plum syrup the other day. The other 8 oz went in the fridge and 4 more oz. were immediately consumed. :lol:

LindsayArthurRTR
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Making half a batch takes the same amount of time as a whole batch, just takes more jars! :() You can do it! I don't usually made 2 batches at the same time. I've had trouble with the gel setting when I do it that way. I go ahead and prep everything that I need for both batches. Jars, lids, fruits, veggies, and I measure out my sweeteners. Then I cook the first batch and while they are processing in the canner, I cook the second batch. While they are processing, I clean up the mess!

Do you use the plum syrup for moistening cakes? Pancakes? How do you make it? I think I wanna try watermelon pickles! :()
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