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tn_veggie_gardner
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Sauces!

I'll kick this one off. Post away with your sauce recipe's! =)

Steve's Famous BBQ Sauce

There are a few flexible ingredients in this recipe, which I will go over first & may not list below. The first one is pepper for spice. Some people do not like hot sauces & some people do. I personally reccomend nothing hotter than a little bit of Cayenne, as this is mainly a sweet sauce. The second flexible ingredient is the fruit part (listed below as fruit spread). The best is fresh blackberries, raspberries, etc. that are seedless & mushed into a paste. If this is not available, pick your favorite type of Jam/jelly spread. =)

This recipe makes a good bit of sauce. Enough for about 20 or so average sized ribs. Multiple/divide as needed for less or more. It's somewhat of a base sauce, which you can easily add other items to kick it up a notch.

Ingredients:
*1/2 medium sized onion, diced into smallest pieces possible
*3 heaping tbsp of fruit spread (see above)
*1 tsp soy sauce
*1 tbsp worcestershire sauce
*a few drops Liquid Smoke (5-10, depending upon how much smokey flavor you like)
*1 16 oz can tomato sauce (not paste)
*1/2 cup brown sugar
*3 tbsp powdered sugar (somewhat optional)
*1/4 cup Molasses (Grandma's is the best!)
*1 tsp dry mustard (about 2 tbsp regular mustard if you don't have dry)
*2 tbsp minced garlic (I love garlic, so this is a bit much for some, but you need at least 1 tsp)
*1 tsp crushed peppercorns
*1/2 tsp black pepper
*1/2 tsp sea salt

Mix brown sugar, powdered sugar, molasses & fruit spread in a small mixing bowl. Microwave for 30-45 seconds, then stir heavily. Combine all other ingredients in large mixing bowl. Slowly stir in sugar mixture made in first step. Let stand for at least 45 minutes to an hour, then stir & use. Best when basted on to ribs/other meat while it cooks. Enjoy! =)

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Ozark Lady
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Wow sounds delicious!

I am glad that you clarified that it is a sweet sauce.

We went out to eat at a new restaurant, and it was barbecue, (Cajun?) not sure, but it was sour and salty, quite a shock. I had never had sour and salty barbecue before. So, folks who prefer one or the other are forewarned.

I bet, you could take some of this sauce, add some diced up green peppers, onions, bit of ham, and cooked up beans, and let it simmer, and have your baked beans to go right along with the barbecued meat!

I am saving this recipe!
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joshbuchan
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hey peeps, what a great bbq source recipe, i love bbq source! so cant wait to give this one ago.

heres a habanero chili source.

u need:

12 habanero peppers, stems removed, finley chopped
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon vegetable oil/ i use olive oil
1/2 cup chopped carrots
1/2 cup distilled vinegar
1/4 cup lime juice

Saute the onion and garlic in oil until soft, add the carrots with a small amount of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until carrots are soft. Place the mixture and raw chiles into a blender and puree until smooth. Don't cook the peppers, since cooking reduces flavor of the Habaneros. Combine the puree with vinegar and lime juice, then simmer for 5 minutes and seal in sterilized bottles.

Heat index: 9 on a scale of 1-10.
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tn_veggie_gardner
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Awesome! I grow a few Hab plants each year and have been looking for a good Hab chili sauce! I love this new recipes thread. =)

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Ozark Lady
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I can't do the really hot peppers, I wonder how this would taste with peppers a bit lower on the scoville scale?

I like great pepper flavor, but with little heat. Could it still taste similar, or do haberneros have other subtle flavors that add to this recipe?
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joshbuchan
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heres a lovly blue berry source.

1 cup Unsweetened pineapple juice
4 teaspoons Cornstarch
1 cup Blueberries -- thawed or fresh

Place the juice in a saucepan with the cornstarch. Cook, stirring until thickened. Add the blueberries. Heat through. Serve warm.

very easy and very taste on ice cream!
Last edited by joshbuchan on Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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I wonder how this would taste with peppers a bit lower on the scoville scale...
You can substitute the hot peppers (and liquid smoke for that matter) with Smoked Paprika. It lends a nice red color to the marinade or rub and imparts a smoky flavor.

Another substitute for liquid smoke is to buy some dried New Mexican Chipotles. Drop the dried pepper in the marinade and if you're cooking the marinade let it cook until enough smoky taste and heat has leached out, then remove the pepper. If you're not cooking the marinade then you can simply dump the dried chipotles in there. Another way is to buy a can of Chipotles in adobo sauce and use the sauce it comes in.

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Ozark Lady
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Thanks, Roger,
I have often wondered about chipotles, was afraid they were hot.
I do grow banana, bells, anaheim, poblano, cubanelle, paprika, pimento, and several others, all lower on the scoville scale. I can't even do a jalapeno.
I will certainly have fun experimenting with the homegrown and chipotles.
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joshbuchan
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wow, sorry OL, i did not evan see your post.

um i am sure u could use any chili, just keep tasting it as u go and u cant go far wrong. also if its to hot i spose u can allways add some tomatos instead of all the chilis so it would be milder.

but me, i like to annihilate my taste buds :P
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The thing with the chipotle, which is a smoked jalapeno, is to remove it before too much of the heat gets out. The smoked paprika doesn't have heat. At least, not any I have ever tasted. I use it in my barbecue rub.

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Ozark Lady
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Okay, Roger, cough up the recipe... barbecue rub... yum! :lol:

I think everyone loves barbecue.
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Well, BBQ Rubs is a little off topic maybe? So I started a new discussion about [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=22939]BBQ Rubs[/url]!

:lol:

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Ozark Lady
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Thank you! That definitely works. I posted a chicken recipe, it has a sauce with it, but the sauce is a marinade, I flipped a coin and it is chicken recipe... ha ha
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Ozark Lady
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I am lousy with measurements, I cook by sight, texture, etc.
I like chinese egg rolls. They used to come with a packet to make some sauce for dipping them in. Well, no sauce packet anymore. So I make my own!

Chinese Hot Mustard Sauce
Version 1
Ketchup in the quantity of sauce you would like to make.
Sugar, equal to the amount of ketchup that you used.
Dry mustard powder. For a mild sauce, just a little bit. maybe 1/4 tsp?
For a medium sauce, add enough to make the ketchup a bit orangey.
For a flaming sauce, add enough to really notice a major color change.
Start small you can always add more.
You have to let this sauce sit for at least 10 minutes for the flavor to develop. I try to match.. like 1 cup ketchup, 1 cup sugar, and 1 tsp of dry mustard powder. Wait the 10 minutes then adjust the recipe.

Version 2
Ketchup in the quantity that you want.
Sugar equal to the ketchup
Regular mustard (in a jar).
Hot sauce of your choice.
Mix Ketchup and sugar. I would go for 2 tsp of mustard to a cup of ketchup, and 1 cup of sugar. Then add your hot sauce drops, you are the best judge of how many you need to make the sauce to your liking.
You really don't need the 10 minutes for this one, but do wait until all the sugar crystals have dissolved.

We like this with egg rolls, pizza rolls, even occassionally on grilled chicken. It is sweet and spicy at the same time. And to me, it doesn't even taste like ketchup!
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I make my own chipotles by splitting a few jalapenos on one side so liquid can escape. I then wrap them in wet paper towels and put them in my smoker when I am smoking meat. I wet the towels so they will shrink around the peppers as they dry. The paper towels keep the smoke soot from sticking to the peppers. The smoke flavor penetrates the towel and pepper and they dry well. I usually smoke them on low heat for ten or twelve hours.

If you happen to be in Southern Colorado or anywhere in New Mexico, stop at one of those produce stands where they are roasting fresh peppers in a big roaster. They usually have really good dried peppers and chipotles and you can't beat the freshly roasted peppers. I usually take a couple of them and remove the blackened skin and eat them on the spot.

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Ozark Lady
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Wow, that means I can make my own chipotles out of Anaheim or poblano peppers! To me poblano's taste a bit smoky naturally.
Then I can procede to using Josh's hot sauce.
I had always heard that habanero's taste a bit fruity. But, they blistered my fingers, and that did it, I am not going to blister my mouth!
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joshbuchan
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Chinese Hot Mustard Sauce now thats what i am talking about! nice one OL, i cant wait to give this one ago.
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tn_veggie_gardner
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Ozark: I made some Chipotle's last year from my Mucho Nacho Jalapeno's. They are awesome! I cleaned them, split them open, smoked them on the grill with Hickory chips for about 6 hours, put them in the dehydrator overnight & chopped 'em up with the food processor in the morning. I still have some of it left. Yum! =)

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Ozark Lady
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I started peppers for the fruit stand, and this morning I noticed, the jalapenos are out performing all of the bell types. So, if I want jalapenos I have plenty to choose from. No, the fruit stand did not provide seeds or anything but trays, so if I keep some, not stealing.

My question is: Is there a way to process the jalapenos to get the great flavor and reduce the heat?
With garlic, raw it is hot, cooked it has flavor and no heat at all.
Is Capsicum water soluble? Could I soak them after seeding them?
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tn_veggie_gardner
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You can scrape out the seeds & only use the outer fruit shell. That would dramatically reduce the flavor. With some (maybe all?) peppers, the seeds are where most of the heat comes from. =)

tedln
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ozarklady,

Split them, deseed them, and then hold them under running water while you rub the membranes. The longer you rinse the membranes, the cooler they get. I suggest using rubber gloves because after cleaning eight or ten peppers, your fingernail cuticles will burn for quite a while.

Ted
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Ozark Lady
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Thanks folks, You know even my anaheims and banana peppers sometimes get hot, especially at the end of the season. And I find if I remove the seeds and stuff it does help. But, an awful lot of them just get thrown away. Oops, sorry, but not edible is not edible. And I only save seeds from the milder ones, sooner or later by natural selection, hopefully, I will eliminate the hottness, late in season.
Yes, I will definitely cage the jalapenos, the last thing I need is for them to mix with my others!
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y'know, if you like the flavor, but not the heat, i've seen a few jalapeno varieties that are supposed to be heat-free that may do the trick...in many of the catalogs.

tedln
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Ozark Lady,

I sometimes hunt game birds with friends. Typically, at the camp; we will wrap a large slice of jalapeno in a slice of bird and wrap that little bundle in a slice of bacon. Stick a toothpick through the bundle to hold it together and cook them on an open fire grill. When you eat them, the jalapeno is never hot. You can taste them real well, but you don't feel the heat. You can probably do the same thing at home with chicken breast.

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BROWN ENCHILADA SAUCE
3 tablespoons chili powder or 3 ripe red Chilis about 5" long each.
3 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon of cocoa powder
1/2 clove of garlic
1 teaspoon oregano
3 cups of water
8 ounces of tomato sauce
Mix in the kitchen blender for 30 to 60 seconds. Heat to a boil. Pour over the Enchilada.


RED ENCHILADA SAUCE
3 tablespoons chili powder or 3 ripe Red Chilis about 5" long each.
3 tablespoons flour
1 clove of garlic
1 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 cups of water
8 ounces of tomato sauce
Mix in the kitchen blender for 30 to 60 seconds. Heat to a boil. Pour over the Enchilada.


GREEN ENCHILADA SAUCE
3 to 8 green Chilis about 5" long each to suite your heat range.
1 small onion
3 tablespoons corn starch
1 clove of garlic
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 cups of water
Mix in the kitchen blender for 60 seconds. Heat to a boil. Pour over the Enchilada.

In Tessessee the Red Enchilada sauce is typically what you will receive in most restaurants unless you ask for green or brown. When I lived in Arizona the Brown Sauce is what most restaurants served. I like the brown sauce best. Only time I ever had white sauce that was good was at a restaurant in Utah.


PICO DE GALLO SAUCE
1 small green chili pepper sliced and diced.
1 medium onion sliced and diced.
2 or 3 medium tomatoes sliced and diced.
1/4 to 1/2 cup of cilantro shopped.
1 clove of garlic sliced and diced.
Juice from 1 lime.
Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste.

Let it stand over night in the refrigerator it gets better with age.
It goes great with a lot of foods. It is good on tacos too.
I like to put a large spoon full on my plate and eat it like a salad.
You can use an hot pepper you like. I don't like the fire hot peppers with a sharp bite. I personally like a mild hot green chili pepper with good flavor rather than a fire hot pepper. If I want it fire hot I just add more of the green chili pepper to spice it up.

TACO SAUCE
2 tomatoes
1 carrot
1/2 onion
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 tablespoon butter
1 clove garlic
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/2 teaspoon salt
Blend in the kitchen blender until the carrot and onion are liquid. Heat to a boil until it becomes thick. If you like hot spicy taco sauce add Red Pepper to suit your taste.
Last edited by Gary350 on Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.

tedln
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Gary,

In Texas, our TexMex food in most restaurants is usually served with the brown sauce. Chicken and cheese enchiladas usually have a white sauce. The green and red sauces are sometimes available on request. I don't know how they do it in Tennessee, but when you sit down at the table, the waitress brings bowls of hot or mild salsa with a basket of tostados to dip the salsa with. We have a few that serve authentic Mexican food. They have everything from a whole talapia with the head on to cabrito to an amazing variety of stews. Everything is usually accompanied with limes to squeeze over it. I prefer the authentic food.

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Ozark Lady
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Mexican restaurants here, bring you salsa, your choice of hot or mild, or both if you want and a basket of warm chips, when they come ask for your drink order. Then they come back for the food order.

Of course the fast food Mexican restaurants don't do that, but they do have a sauce section with a selection of salsa's, relish, jalapeno's and lemons for eating with your order. And these are made fresh, not packages of stuff. Yummm
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zookprqn
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Mushroom Garlic sauce

Just a note: I tried clicking on the link...it would not load. So I went to the website and found the recipe by searching their website. Not sure if anyone else will have this problem...just a heads up if it doesn't work for you through the link!

I LOVE mushrooms and garlic...can't wait to try the recipe! thanks for the link/info!
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WinglessAngel
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Best and easiest BBQ ever!

I love this BBQ recipe and as it cools in the fridge it thickens up on its own, only 5 ingredients and a one pot method....here goes....enjoy e1!

My Own Recipe though ;)

Sweet and Tangy BBQ Sauce:

1 Cup Ketchup
1 Cup Packed Brown Sugar
1/2 Cup Cider Vinegar
1/2 Yellow Mustard
1/8 Cup Hot Sauce (You could forego this but I personally can't even taste it)

Simmer on low heat about 20 mins to melt the sugar and combine the ingredients well...Makes about 2 Cups of BBQ sauce and can be used warm or cold...as it sits in the fridge it will thicken more to a full BBQ sauce consistency :)

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only 5 ingredients
Actually, there are dozens of ingredients in that recipe. There are at least a half dozen ingredients for the ketchup alone. ;) Ketchup has a surprising amount of sugar in it already, plus vinegar and salt. Mustard also has vinegar, seeds, and sometimes spices like turmeric. Very often the mustard and ketchup both have cider vinegar- the better brands have better vinegars.

That recipe will get expensive if we use organic ketchup, mustard, sugar, etc. There is probably a better and more affordable way to create a barbecue sauce from scratch, starting with tomatoes, either already peeled and from a can or bottle or going way scratch and peeling and boiling them yourself. Either way, I am certain the tomatoes can be boiled down to a thicker mixture. Then you can add your sweet and sour ingredients.

A teriyaki basting sauce I make is simply soy sauce, juice, sugar, ginger, garlic powder and oil (I use sunflower oil). That's about six ingredients (more if we quibble about the water, soy, and sometimes alcohol in the soy sauce. ;) ). So that's a base. I bet one can mix in some reduced tomatos to get a barbecue sauce out of that.

I'm not a fan of the ketchup, mustard etc. approach. It's easy to do with less expensive ingredients. But getting more control over the ingredients isn't much more work.

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its all to everyone's preference, but it's easiest for me in the kitchen and is fast to make, my fiance loves it so i don't make any other kind of bbq sauce....but change it up if you want to...thats just the way i do it at home :)

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