imafan26
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Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

What a coincidence! Even though it is hot and muggy for this time of the year. I made soup too. I made Portuguese ham and bean soup. I don't have any pictures. I am having the last bowl of it today. It takes a couple of days to make and it best eaten the day after. I used the slow cooker this time.
Portuguese ham and bean soup
Wash and soak 1 lb red kidney beans overnight in water. If you are using canned beans skip this step.
In slow cooker (6qt) add to pot the same time beans are being soaked.
2-3 smoked ham hocks or shanks. Leftover ham bone can also be used
1 lb smoked boneless ham, diced
1-2 Portuguese linguica, sliced or diced, pan fried till browned and added to the pot
(Anduille, chorizo, Kielbasa, or other spicy sausage can be used if you cannot find Portuguese sausage, but the flavor will be different. You may have to add tobasco or chilies for more heat)
1 onion chopped
1 potato diced in 1/4 inch chunks
4 stalks celery
2 ham soup bouillon
1 quart chicken stock and water to cover meat.
2 bay leaves
2 packets sazon.
Salt and pepper to taste
Set slow cooker on Auto and cook for 5 hours
Remove and de bone the hocks and shanks. Dice the meat and return to the pot. Optional to dice the skin as well or discard.
Cooked soaked beans until tender about 1 hour. Drain and add to soup. Or add 2 cans drained canned beans. You can add the bean liquid but usually there isn't going to be enough room unless you have a larger pot.
Add
1- 29 oz can crushed tomatoes or Tomato puree
6 oz can tomato paste
4 large carrots cut into 1 inch chunks
2 large potatoes cut into 1 inch chunks
Continue cooking for another 4 hours or until the vegetables are done.
I had to remove some of the stock. The pot was too full.
Adjust the seasoning add more salt, pepper or Tabasco or pepper flakes if needed.

Parboil and drain:
1 medium cabbage, cut into chunks
Add to soup and cook for another 30 minutes.
turn off the cooker.
Add 1 bunch cilantro leaves to the pot and stir it in.
Cool and refrigerate overnight. Skim off the fat in the morning.
I did not have much fat to skim off my soup. Cabbage makes the soup taste sour, but will mellow out if the soup is allowed to
blend the flavors for a day. I was able to add back the stock I removed once the bones were removed.

Optional:
Cook elbow macaroni and drain.
Add some cooked elbow macaroni to the bowl when the soup is reheated and served. Macaroni can be added to the soup, but only if you are going to eat all of the soup at one time. Otherwise the macaroni will get mushy and absorb the soup.

Serve soup with soda crackers or Portuguese bread ( I like sweetbread, but white buns work too.)

Most of the time unless you have a really big pot, the soup will end up in two pots.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

We made garden Chili for dinner. We cooked 1 lb of 97% lean ground beef, 1 large onion, 10 large garlic cloves, 1/2 lb Cajun Pork Sausage, cook in skillet until cooked then add, 1 quart garden whole tomatoes with skins, 1 can Ro-Tel, 2 garden Red color New Mexico Chilies, 1 cup garden sweet corn, 1 can dark red kidney beans, 1 can BBQ Baked beans, cook in pot until it comes to a boil. Add 1 T BBQ sauce, 3 spoons of Dark Brown Sugar to taste, salt, black pepper, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, 1/4 cup red wine. This has to be the #1 best chili we ever made. We started out with the old recipe but we did not follow the recipe, we threw in as much as we though might taste good and keep tasting it as we go. I ate 3 bowls.
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pepperhead212
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Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I was in the mood for a Mexican or TexMex type dish, so I made some chili, with ground beef, and I added some canned black beans and some of that dried eggplant, rehydrated, while doing most of the rest of the dish. I cooked the beef in a sauté pan, but I tried using the Instant Pot, to speed up cooking the "sauce", but it just didn't taste right, so I added the beef to it, and let it simmer for about 30 min., but it still wasn't quite right, so I played with the seasonings, then added the beans, and put it on slow cook high, and after 30 minutes, added the drained eggplant, and simmered another 30 minutes, and finally, the flavor was coming around. So now I know, pressure cooking this kind of sauce does not speed up a long, slow simmer! I finished it by thickening with some masa harina, and had a couple of corn tortillas with it, and topped with some Monterey jack.
ImageChili, with some black beans and re-hydrated eggplant. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

Vanisle_BC
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Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Recipes from literary tales?

Have you picked up recipes that were included or referenced in stories you were reading? We have one or two we found that way.

From the quirky novel 'Stanley Park' we got "Grenadin de Porc au Beurre La Fin Du Monde" - a fancy French name but we just call it Pork Chops Stanley Park and we like it a lot. Fin Du Monde is the name of the French-Canadian beer it's cooked in - quite pricey with a very unusual flavor I've acquired a taste for.

'The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society' provides a wartime occupation/austerity recipe for - Potato Peel Pie! We made it and took samples to the library where the ladies sampled it and bravely, straight-faced, pronounced it delicious. It was not! Although if you were starving .......

'A Gentleman in Moscow' referenced Latvian stew but gave no recipe. Online there are several guesses at how to make it, all including dried apricots. We cobbled one together from the various suggestions and enjoyed it, served with Gorgonzola perogies.

If you enjoy stories with unusual plots or recipes with unusual ingredients, in each case I would recommend two of the three above - but not the same two! :).

Any other pointers to books with 'different' plot lines? Particularly if they're about food or include recipes?
We have work to do on all our politicians, after the votes are counted Delores Broten

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Gary350
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Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Vanisle_BC wrote:
Fri Nov 13, 2020 3:41 am
Recipes from literary tales?

Have you picked up recipes that were included or referenced in stories you were reading? We have one or two we found that way.

From the quirky novel 'Stanley Park' we got "Grenadin de Porc au Beurre La Fin Du Monde" - a fancy French name but we just call it Pork Chops Stanley Park and we like it a lot. Fin Du Monde is the name of the French-Canadian beer it's cooked in - quite pricey with a very unusual flavor I've acquired a taste for.

'The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society' provides a wartime occupation/austerity recipe for - Potato Peel Pie! We made it and took samples to the library where the ladies sampled it and bravely, straight-faced, pronounced it delicious. It was not! Although if you were starving .......

'A Gentleman in Moscow' referenced Latvian stew but gave no recipe. Online there are several guesses at how to make it, all including dried apricots. We cobbled one together from the various suggestions and enjoyed it, served with Gorgonzola perogies.

If you enjoy stories with unusual plots or recipes with unusual ingredients, in each case I would recommend two of the three above - but not the same two! :).

Any other pointers to books with 'different' plot lines? Particularly if they're about food or include recipes?
I love potato peels from a baked potato I might like Potato Peel Pie. I love to try new foods especially from other countries. I don't find recipes or food names in the type books I read, electronics, chemistry, physics, science, engineering, etc. I have bought books to cook certain foods but I have a problem knowing what I am cooking from only the a name that I often can not pronounce & no pictures. I can't cook anything with my India cook book I can not get fresh spices & if its not cooked the correct way it tastes totally different than it should. German food is a lot like American food with some very creative differences. I love to watch cooking shows on TV, Italy, France & Poland have some very good looking food. I have made German Pasty & Jewish Knish both are very good, I had to watch YouTube videos to learn how to cook it. German Pasty is basically pie crust filled with Beef Stew bakes in the oven in fried pie shapes, squares, 6 sides of 8 sides or round then covered with gravy when eaten. Wife decided Pasty is very easy to make in single service Pot Pie Bowls the crispy pie crust makes it very good & gravy makes it extra good. I found a very mild sauerkraut recipe I like it taste a lot like cooked cabbage with a good Kraut flavor that is not sour. Jewish Knish is a mash potato base mix of cooked vegetables & meat rolled up in bread dough then baked in the oven, it looks like a small 1 person size loaf of bread with filling inside, these are very good too I have made them several times. I know nothing about Russian food, I never see recipes, books or cooking shows for it. Monday night there is a TV show I like, the lady travels and shows, wine, deserts, & foods from several countries, food looks good I would love to travel just to eat different food. She showed a wine I would love to try but have not found it online yet or at the local wine store. She does not show recipes only how it is made & assembled in the kitchen. Oriental countries cook a lot of the same things cooked different ways with different spices. I was interested in Korean food several months ago and cooked several interesting things that were good but not as good as Thai food. I know a lady from Vietnam she showed me how to cook several things, she makes it look easy, it is not easy for me.

Vanisle_BC
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Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Sometimes I stumble across a reference to a dish with an unusual name, and search for the recipe. For instance:
Northumberland Pan Haggerty.
A simple, tasty dish made with layers of potato, cheese & onion. Plenty of recipes online, even with pictures :).
We have work to do on all our politicians, after the votes are counted Delores Broten

Vanisle_BC
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Posts: 853
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

We have a wide mouth pottery jar that sits on top of the control panel above the stove top. Whenever we use a herb or spice in a recipe we chuck some surplus into the jar; so the mix is always changing. Even fresh chopped herbs are OK. They dry from the heat there and don't go moldy. When we're unsure about seasoning, or just in an ad-lib kind of mood, a sprinkle (or a handful) from the jar goes into whatever we're cooking. A sniff at the jar is always inspiring!
We have work to do on all our politicians, after the votes are counted Delores Broten

pepperhead212
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Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I didn't do much outside today - windy and cool again, but getting into the 60s the next couple of days, so I'll wait! lol And it was getting darker, around 4:30, and I remembered that I wanted to harvest something, so I went out and harvested some Swiss chard, and some other greens, for the soup in the slow cooker. The greens in the raised bed had a bout with slugs in early October - I always put some sluggo down, but it got washed away, even though in granules, due to some very heavy rain, at that time. By the time I put some more down, the slugs had already hit, and some of those early leaves are now getting harvested, and the holes have grown!
ImageKomatsuna, with old slug holes, that grew large. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Out front, the Swiss chard had not been touched by slugs!

So I made a soup in the IP, using some great northern beans, those miscellaneous greens, and some turkey kielbasa. I started it with a mirepoix, with some garlic added. I added a couple tb of the chicken broth concentrate, and a generous tb of red miso, 3 bay leaves, and 2 tb minced fresh sage, along with 9 cups of water, and a pound of great northern beans. I brought it to a simmer in the sauté mode, then switched to the medium slow cook mode. I cooked it 3 hours, then added 1/2 cup pearl barley, along with the greens, and about 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper. Then I lightly browned the cut up sausage, and added that, and cooked another 90 minutes. Then I added a half cup of red lentils, to thicken the broth, and cooked another 30 min. I stirred in another 2 tsp of fresh sage, before serving.
ImageAbout 8 cups of cut up greens, washed and spun dry. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageHalf cooked soup, with greens added. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished soup. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageSoup, ready to serve. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

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