User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27795
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Looks great! I love mushrooms. :D

The other day, I made pasta — bow ties — and for sauce, sea salt and EVOO sweated diced sweet onions and garlic, added diced Eryngii mushrooms, added ground turkey until heated through, then added reserved chicken drippinga and fat from previously cooked roasted chicken legs. For veg, I added frozen sweet corn and my own frozen sweet red and yellow peppers, a big bunch of fresh parsley and Asian greens from my winter indoor garden, my own dried sweet marjoram, and then ground mace and cumin. Tossed the cooked pasta with a bit of cooking water with this mixture. I had 2 servings, second serving with kefir. DH also used kefir. Older DD said there were too many mushrooms and gave me hers, but 2nd DD said the abundance of the mushrooms made this particularly good.... and I agree! :wink:
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Tonight I made a creole style dish, like jambalaya, without the shrimp, but some okra added. I had 2 sort of old bell peppers I had to use, about 2 cups of crushed canned tomatoes left from another dish, and a ham steak. I was going to use a pint of frozen okra plus some rehydrated eggplant, but instead, I used 2 pints of okra - something I have a good amount of to use up! I used half parboiled basmati, and half whole oats, instead of all rice, and added a little white wine - something in my favorite jambalaya recipe.
ImageOnions, peppers, and garlic, to start the dish. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageOkra added to the sauté. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageHam and tomatoes added, before adding liquid, rice, and whole oats. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished dish, after cooking rice and oats. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished dish. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11269
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I tried a new/old recipe today. I started a Paleo/keto diet for about 6 days now.
I saw a Paleo recipe for Thai coconut chicken curry. After reading the recipe it was an American version of Thai chicken curry without the basil. To me, Thai food usually has chile, lemon grass, fish sauce, kaffir lime, and basil in pretty much every recipe. The Thai taste is sweet, salty, bitter, and hot. The blend of the flavors makes it unique.

Thai Chicken Curry
4 servings
4 tsp of Red curry paste I used half 2 tsp because it was too much salt for my diet
and I added a chopped fresh super chile to boost the
heat. Next time I will add two, it was a little too tame.
1 1/2 cups coconut milk I ended up using 2 cups to finish the can, I added 1 cup
water . I thought I did not
have enough liquid. Next time I will add another cup
of coconut milk instead. It was a little too thin.
500 grams of chicken (approx 4 cups chopped rotisserie chicken) I cut the chicken to 236 grams (approx 2 cups) because
I would have gone over my protein limit for the day
1 1/2 Tablespoons fish sauce I only used 1 tablespoon. It was too much salt for me.
2-3 tablespoons palm sugar light brown sugar can be a substitute for palm sugar
I used truvia instead, but I used too much next time I
will cut it in half and use 2 packets instead of 4.
1 cup chicken stock I used water instead to cut the salt.
1 lb kabocha pumpkin cut into chunks butternut squash can also be used.
1 cup Thai basil Sweet or Thai basil works. I used Ajaka. I only had
1/4 cup but it was better than nothing.
1 red bell pepper, cut in strips I used 10 oz of mung bean sprouts and 120 gms
of Komatsuna. Komatsuna is in my garden and it
gives the curry color.
Original directions
Over medium heat, dissolve red curry paste in 1/2 cup of coconut milk. Simmer, until the coconut breaks and the oil separates.
Add in the remaining coconut milk and kabocha chunks. Simmer for about 8-10 minutes until kabocha is tender. Add in cooked chicken, stock, sugar, peppers, and fish sauce (adjust fish sauce to your taste). Simmer for about 5 minutes. Peppers should be crisp tender. Make final adjustments for taste. Turn off the heat, stir in the basil. Serve hot over rice or cauliflower rice (Keto).

My changes.
Saute curry paste, minced hot chili pepper with seeds, in 1 tablespoon avocado oil until it bubbles (this is the usual way to start curries. I chose avocado oil for keto). Add in 1/2 cup coconut milk and simmer over medium heat until the curry paste is dissolved and the coconut milk is reduced and breaks (the oil separates). Add in the remaining coconut milk and kabocha chunks. Add in 1 cup of chicken stock ( I used water to reduce the salt), sugar, and fish sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for about 8 minutes or unitil the kabocha are tender (not mushy). (I should not have solanaceous fruits on my diet like bell peppers) so I used 10 oz if washed and rinsed mung bean spouts, 120 gm (about 2 cups) of chopped komatsuna (for color). Simmer another 5 minutes until vegetables are wilted. Taste and adjust seasoning. Turn off the heat and stir in the basil.

Serve over rice or cauliflower rice (keto). A squirt of fresh lime juice will brighten the flavor.

Other things you can add, straw mushrooms, bamboo shoots, spinach, julienne daikon, and beans.
Per 1 cup serving: calories 220 , 17 gm protein, 14 gm fat, 5gm carb, potassium 468, sodium 743 mg, chol 45 mg

Omitting the chicken and adding more vegetables and a kaffir lime leaf will make it more like Evil Jungle Prince.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

This was definitely one of those random dishes, using things I had around. It was a one dish (well, almost) meal today, starting with a small butternut. I was going to make an Indian dish, but I had a bunch of basil I trimmed, that I wanted to use up, so I made it Italian. I started with making a tomato sauce, sautéing a large chopped onion in olive oil, then adding a bunch of minced garlic, and a can of tomatoes, and a generous half cup of chopped basil. This cooked in slow cooker mode of the IP, while getting the butternut, mushrooms, and sausage ready. I added the butternut, 1 c of brown lentils, 1/2 c of whole oats, and 4 1/2 c water, using fish sauce as the salt source - something I use a lot in Italian dishes. After about 2 1/2 hours cooking (and adding a little more water), I added the cooked sweet Italian sausage and mushrooms, cooked another half hour, then turned it off, and added another half cup of chopped basil, and served it, with some grated Locatelli.
ImageDiced butternut, added to the Italian style gruel. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageItalian style gruel, finished cooking with sausage and mushrooms. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageReady to serve Italian gruel, topped with grated Locatelli. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

User avatar
Lindsaylew82
Mod
Posts: 2116
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 1:26 am
Location: Upstate, SC

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I had a bunch of frozen corn left over from dinner last night, and I’m the only one who eats leftovers! So I made some quick corn fritters.
Left over corn, some diced red pepper, a diced jalapeño, chopped cilantro leaves and lots of stems, onion powder, garlic powder, pinch of salt and pepper, baking soda, baking powder, cumin, and cayenne. Added milk slowly to get the right consistency, then I pan fried them in extra light olive oil. So yummy! Served them with guacamole!
586ADB07-83C0-48C8-A7AA-CBCC4CABA775.jpeg
Lindsay
Upstate, SC
USDA Zone 7b/ Sunset Zone 31

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I finally got around to cooking again, not just thawing and heating up leftovers (though I have to do this, since I have to make room in the freezer, for the harvest). I got my seeds in, and all the pots filled, which is what I've been doing the last week, along with stuff in the workshop.

I made a vindaloo curry, with cremini mushrooms, kohlrabi, potato, and edamame. The original recipe called for mushrooms, potato, cauliflower, and peas, so I substituted for the cauliflower and peas, and added some Thai peppers, for more heat. And I baked some WW pav - some yeast rolls often served with Goan dishes.
ImageToasted spices, for vindaloo sauce. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageGround up spices, before adding wet ingredients. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageChiles, ginger, and garlic added to the spices, for the vindaloo paste. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageVindaloo paste. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImagePaste added to onions and green chiles. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImagePaste, cooked down for about 8 minutes. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageWater and edamame added, to cook down. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImagePotato, kohlrabi, and mushrooms, added to cook a few minutes more. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished vindaloo curry, served with a WW pav. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

And here are the pav, which are usually placed in a pan, where they run together, but I like more crust.
ImageRisen WW pav, ready to go into the oven. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageBaked WW pav, ready to come out of the oven. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Tonight, I made up a dish using some dried tomatoes and eggplants - approximately 3 lbs worth of tomatoes, and 2 lbs worth of eggplants. I toasted the tomatoes briefly in a dry skillet, then soaked in hot water until soft; the eggplants were soaked in hot water until I finished all of the preps, and it was still sort of hard, but it was to be pressure cooked, so no problem. The tomatoes were blended to just 5 cups, so it was thick. I cooked some onions, garlic, and bell peppers, and set them aside, then added some spelt, barley, thyme, and chopped parsley and basil, plus the eggplant and some more water, and set the IP to 15 min to pressure cook. When done, I released the pressure, stirred in about 1/2 c toor dal, and re-set it to pressure cook 10 more minutes. When the pressure was released naturally, I stirred the onions, garlic, and peppers back into it, along with the second half of the basil, and that was it!
ImageCooked peppers, onions, and garlic, added after the pressure cooking. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished dish, made with dried tomatoes and eggplants. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageDish served with some grated pecorino. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27795
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Are you trying to use up your supply of last summer’s preserved harvest? This sounds very rich (full of flavor)! — decadent even. Yum!
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

apple, I actually have some eggplant from 2018, and that's what these were! They last forever, in my experience. And last season I only had 4 plants - in 2018 had 6! And this season I have 8 plants, though I might only have room for 7. However, with the pandemic, I might figure out somewhere to plant everything! The more the better.
Dave

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4979
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Is eggplant in the squash family?

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Gary, Eggplant is in the nightshade family, along with the tomatoes, peppers, and potatoes.
Dave

Vanisle_BC
Greener Thumb
Posts: 740
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Leftover pickle juice:

We have about a liter of juice left from home made bread & butter pickles. I'd hate to throw it away, so what are your suggestions for using it? Other than just drinking it, that is :). I'm thinking it could become a sort of Asian dipping sauce, with some ginger added - and pickled ginger slices as a by-product. Maybe could be included in a marinade, or used as the base flavouring for some adventurous dish.

What suggestions do you come up with?
I just might try it instead of water in my (cheapest!) Scotch.
The terms of political discourse are not models of precision. - (Noam Chomsky)

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4979
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Vanisle_BC wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 12:21 am
Leftover pickle juice:

We have about a liter of juice left from home made bread & butter pickles. I'd hate to throw it away, so what are your suggestions for using it? Other than just drinking it, that is :). I'm thinking it could become a sort of Asian dipping sauce, with some ginger added - and pickled ginger slices as a by-product. Maybe could be included in a marinade, or used as the base flavouring for some adventurous dish.

What suggestions do you come up with?
I just might try it instead of water in my (cheapest!) Scotch.
We use bread & butter pickle juice in, coleslaw, potato salad, chicken salad, ham salad, bean salad, all summer. Some times other salads with mixed vegetables. Also good in macaroni salad & tomato salad. I use it in quart jars of pickled vegetables with, broccoli, carrots, onions, green beans, or any vegetables we like. Also good in Chinese stir fry and marinade. Add a little to BBQ sauce it is good on chicken & pork chops cooked on the BBQ grill in summer. Summer we eat lots of cold food and cook outside on BBQ grill.

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4979
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

SauerKraut.

This is a very easy recipe watch the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpRmoit5vNw

Vanisle_BC
Greener Thumb
Posts: 740
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Gary350 wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 1:15 am
We use bread & butter pickle juice in, coleslaw, potato salad, chicken salad, ham salad, bean salad, all summer. Some times other salads with mixed vegetables. Also good in macaroni salad & tomato salad. I use it in quart jars of pickled vegetables with, broccoli, carrots, onions, green beans, or any vegetables we like. Also good in Chinese stir fry and marinade. Add a little to BBQ sauce it is good on chicken & pork chops cooked on the BBQ grill in summer. Summer we eat lots of cold food and cook outside on BBQ grill.
We chopped our latest Asparagus spears and put them in the pickle juice for a few days - delicious. The juice soaks right into the Asparagus stems.

(Edit) Stopping the Asparagus harvesting now, beginning of June, and will let the feathery tops open out.
The terms of political discourse are not models of precision. - (Noam Chomsky)

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4979
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

BAKED BEANS. This is a very old recipe I have been making it for 50 years it is the best Bake Bean recipe I have found. Wife likes to buy factory bake beans it is easy, microwave 1 minutes ready to eat. I told her, stop buying those horrible factory beans I am going to start making my recipe again it only takes 3 or 4 minutes minutes.

Put 1/4 cup hot water in a measuring cup then add Dark brown sugar until volume increases to 1/2 cup stir well.

Next add BBQ sauce until volume comes up to 3/4 cup mix well.

Then add diced onions until you have 1 cup stir well.

Mix with one 15 oz can of SHOEBOAT pork & beans.

Add 3/4 teaspoon of fresh ground black pepper.

Optional add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of crushed Red Pepper for a tiny bit of spicy flavor.

Bring to a boil in a pan for 2 minutes then turn off the heat. Leave pan of beans on stove to cool slow naturally. You can eat beans now but tomorrow flavor is 2 times better plus color turns dark red tomorrow.

You can also bake these beans in a pan in the oven 350 degrees F about 30 minutes.

If you substitute I guarantee it will not taste like it should. For some reason this combination of items tastes best. If you try different beans it tastes different. If you try, light brown sugar, white sugar, honey, it will taste weird. If you try a different brand BBQ sauce it spoils the whole flavor.
Attachments
100_6955.JPG
100_6956.JPG
100_6957.JPG
100_6953.JPG
100_6891.JPG

Vanisle_BC
Greener Thumb
Posts: 740
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 1:02 am
Location: Port Alberni, B.C. Canada, Zone 7 (+?)

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I'm slowly modifying my standard 'wholewheat potato bread' recipe to include seeds & grains. My first batch had about 1/3c grains added to the original recipe (for 2 loaves.) I used equal amounts of sesame seeds, chia seeds and steel-cut "Scotch' oats; all toasted before adding, but they went in right at the start with the rest of the ingredients. The result is good with a subtle new flavor. I'll increase the seed/grain amount next time.

I use a bread machine to make the dough, then I roll out the bubbles, roll up 2 loaves and put them in bread pans to rise & bake. the machine is supposed to do one 3-cup loaf but easily makes a double quantity of dough (it's often pushing the lid open by the time I take it out.)

The original recipe to make 2 loaves:

Wholewheat flour: 4 cups
White flour: 1 cup
Boiled & mashed potato: 1 cup
Butter: 2 Tablespoons
Sugar : 2 Tablespoons
Salt : 2 teaspoons
Water : 1-1/3 cups (preferably from boiling the potato.)
Yeast : 2-1/4 teaspoons

The only ingredients I actually measure are the 5 cups of flour and the rest is eyeballed. The real amount of potato depends solely on the size of the spuds in the pantry. I usually mash the butter, salt & sugar in with the potato. The water I play 'by inspection' to get a fairly soft dough. In my case the 1-1/3 cups is generally not enough and I add, gradually, during the kneading cycles. If there's not enough potato water the tap supplies the rest. If the dough was becoming too wet/soft I guess I would add flour but I don't recall ever having to.

The machine takes 1.5 hours to do the dough. I let it rise in the pans for another hour or so, then bake 30-35 min at 350. So far I've never put a dish of water in the oven along with it. I may try that to see what it does for the crust; but I'm happy with this bread as it is.
The terms of political discourse are not models of precision. - (Noam Chomsky)

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I made a delicious dish tonight, based on a Milk Street's July/August issue - Ethiopian Stewed Collard Greens. However, I used 4 different greens from the garden in my dish - Kohlrabi, Senposai, Red Bor kale, and some Kohlrabi greens. I also added some ground beef, which the article says is frequently in the dish, and I had to use up some from the freezer. I doubled the recipe, because I had so many greens to use, and made it in the CI wok - something it all fit in, once it wilted.

It started by browning some onions in ghee, then browned the beef, then this spice/garlic mix was added and cooked briefly, before the greens were added. At the end, the chilis and more ginger was added, along with some lemon juice.
ImageGarlic and spices, plus the finishing chilis, for the Etiopian greens, from Milk Street July August. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageEthiopian greens, about half way through cooking. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished Ethiopian Spiced Greens, from Milk Street. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I also made a dish of millet and browned rice in the Instant pot, to eat it with, to soak up some of that liquid, since I didn't have any bread. I often mix millet with jasmine rice, as well, as it much more nutritious than white rice, and lets the flavor of the jasmine rice shine through.
Dave

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27795
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Yum! That looks sooooo goood! :-()
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I have always liked boiled peanuts, and when I was a child, and we would travel down south in the summer, to visit relatives, was the only time I could get them - no raw peanuts up here, back then. They had the shells on them, which I still can't find here, but they are still good.

I made another delicious version of boiled peanuts yesterday. I've made Mexican, Thai, Indian, and Chinese flavored versions before, and yesterday, I got an idea for a new Chinese type, when I saw the Lapsang Souchong tea in my cupboard - something that I rarely use, except when I make tea eggs. So I made a batch of strong tea, using enough water to cover the peanuts by about an inch in the Instant Pot, strained it into the IP, then added some dark soy sauce, palm sugar, cassia sticks, star anise, and a few whole cloves. This time, I cooked it in the high heat slow cooker mode, for about 5 hours (sometimes I pressure cook them for 30 min., then finish on slow cook; 40 min on pressure cook is a little too long), then cooled for an hour, and chilled.
ImageTea cooked boiled peanuts. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I made something with that first eggplant - a simple sambar, with a bell pepper, onion, and some garlic. I added some millet, along with the toor dal, and cooked that in the Instant Pot, cooking those vegetables in a sauté pan, on my induction burner. I added the sambar masala to the pan the last minute, with the garlic. This was added to the dal, along with the tamarind, and a little jaggery, and simmered briefly, while preparing the tarka. That only takes about 30 sec., which is added, and mixed in, along with a couple of tb of chopped cilantro.
ImageEggplant and bell pepper sambar by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I used a lot of things from the garden today.
I made some Szechwan eggplant tonight - the first thing I do every season when I get 2 lbs of eggplant. I also used garlic and scallion from the garden, and the first 6 okras - not traditional, but I didn't have enough to do anything with, so I added them to this.

The original recipe for this called for 8 scallions and 8 cloves of garlic, and as usual, I doubled it! Yet all it took was a huge scallion, that looked like a leek, to chop up into over 4 cups!
ImageA very large scallion! by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageIngredients for the Szechwan eggplant. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageSzechwan eggplant, about half way through the stir-fry part. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I made a 50/50 batch of brown basmati and millet in the Instant Pot, and served it with that:
ImageSzechwan eggplant, served on a ring of brown rice and millet. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4979
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Cracker Crust Pizza

This is the best pizza crust I ever had, I never knew how to make it until now. Mix up the dough recipe, the Left side makes 2 large pizzas, right side is 1 large crust. Mix just enough to mix in all the dry flour then roll it out flat and thin. Place on greased pizza pan then poke 100s of holes in the crust with a fork this prevents crust from bubbling up like a balloon. Bake crust 425 degrees about 7 minutes until crust is crispy/crunchy like a cracker. Put pizza sauce on the crust then cheese, then all the toppings. Bake 425 degrees 13 minutes.

At the last minute we left off the thin sliced tomatoes so I ate them. I made a mistake and put cheese on last but pizza was still good. I put garden onion diced on the pizza and jalapeno pepper slices. I made homemade pizza sauce with 2 tomatoes sliced with seeds & jelly stuff removed, puree in blender with 1 garden basil leaf & oregano. It turned out good.
Attachments
100_7172.JPG
100_7173.JPG
100_7174.JPG
100_7175.JPG
100_7176.JPG
100_7178.JPG
100_7181.JPG

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Another cheap dish, with some more eggplants from the garden, some dried tomatoes from last season, and only a small amount of 99¢/lb beef from the freezer, made into chorizo, with some garlic, chiles, coriander, cumin, cloves, a pinch of canela, and some vinegar. Usually I make up a lot of pork chorizo, to freeze, but lately, I've been trying to empty out my freezer! When cooking chirizo, and most sausages, for that matter, I try too cook them up into chunks, instead of a fine, homogenized ground meat mix.

I used that method of drying out the eggplant cubes for 8 min. on high in the MW - not quite as long as ATK does it, but it does reduce the moisture greatly (went from 18 oz to just under 12 oz), and keeps it from getting mushy. And you can see how non-seedy it is.
Image9 oz Ichiban eggplant, showing how it grew fairly large, without getting at all seedy. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageSauce of chipotles and dried tomatoes, ready to combine with eggplant cubes, cooked 8 minutes in MW by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageCooked beef chorizo. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageTaco, with eggplant, chorizo, and a chipotle sauce. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I made a favorite recipe tonight - Thai curry. A red one, this time, with some things from the garden - kohlrabi, okra, eggplant, and some Thai basil and kaffir lime leaves - plus some chicken.

I used the method ATK used for drying out eggplant to make ratatouille, to keep it from turning mushy. I don't cook them down as much as they do, but I do it about 8-9 min., to cook them down to about half weight.
ImageFirst of two plates of eggplants, to dry out in the microwave. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageAll 5 eggplants, dried out in microwave. 31 oz down to 14.5 oz by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageIngredients lined up for a Thai curry. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageEverything added to the Thai curry, except for the eggplant and lime juice. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageEggplant added to the Thai curry, to cook 10 min. longer. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished Thai curry, served in a ring of white jasmine rice and millet. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27795
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

It won’t be me, you understand. But fire up your smokers y’all— I’d love to see a report after you make this :-()
Food Insider (@InsiderFood) Tweeted:
It may look like a ham, but it's actually a smoked watermelon 🤯 https://t.co/uCJQFsz2nh


https://twitter.com/InsiderFood/status/ ... 33895?s=20
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

Made another double batch of Szechwan eggplant, with 7 eggplants, scallions, and a bunch of garlic from the garden. This time I tossed it with pasta.
ImageSzechwan eggplant, tossed with pasta. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I made some zucchini bread today, but used that tinda gourd, shredded, in place of zucchini, and it was the same, basically - very wet, but no water running out of it. Delicious, but will be better tomorrow, like most spice breads.
ImageTinda gourd, cut open, seeds just beginning to form, but not form shells. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageZucchini bread, made with shredded Tinda gourd. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

pepperhead212
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1547
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 5:52 pm
Location: Woodbury NJ Zone 6B

Re: Let's talk recipes -- are you as random as I am?

I made cheap dish today, with a lot of ingredients from the garden. It was sort of a gumbo, which I made in the Instant Pot, to use up 1½ qts of okra, that I'm getting mostly from the 12 Little Lucy plants, but have finally started getting them from the 6 Emerald plants. I started with some bacon - the only smoky meat I had in stock - then added some onion, celery, bell and jalapeño peppers, spices and herbs, and garlic, to cook about 10 min., adding some tomato paste towards the end. I then added the puréed tomatoes, okra, and some pearled barley, and cooked in the slow cooker high mode for 2½ hours. It seemed to need more water, so I added more, and cooked on the medium slow cooker mode for 1½ hours, and it was done just right.
ImageOkra, cut up for the gumbo. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Image5 cups of fresh tomato purée, for the gumbo. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageThe bacon, onion, celery, bell peppers, garlic, spices, and a little tomato paste, cooked in the Instant Pot. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImagePearl barley and okra, added to the tomato mix of the gumbo. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageGumbo, after cooking 2 1/2 hrs in high slow cooker mode, in Instant Pot. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

ImageFinished gumbo by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Dave

Return to “Canning - Preserving - Recipes”