StacyAnderson
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Location: Tecumseh Michigan

Chinese Elm

Hi Norm,

I just wanted to let you know that my little Bonsai is doing much, much better !! It seems to be happy and healthy now, so your suggestion that it may have just needed time to settle down seems to have been spot-on. However, I just have one more question for you. You had suggested that I should wait until it comes out of dormancy before repotting it. How do I tell when that is happening? I appreciate your time and advice. Thanks so much.

Sincerely,
Stacy :D
Stacy Anderson

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Stacy,

A Chinese Elm that is kept inside will not be able to experience a proper dormancy, that's one of the drawbacks of keeping them inside year-round. How committed are you to keeping this tree as a strictly indoor bonsai? Are you able and willing to manage it as a deciduous tree, meaning allowing a full (or perhaps abbreviated) dormancy?

Norm

StacyAnderson
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Location: Tecumseh Michigan

Chinese Elm

Hi Norm,

I am fully committed to this tree, period. I would like to have it out during the summer, but I can take care of it no matter what. The reason I asked is because it has some little branches on it that are green, and it is really starting to take off. Lots of "new" green branches and new leaves too. I would love to see it have a nice "coming out of dormancy" so I probably should move it outdoors as soon as it's warm enough. I would like it to grow more so I can begin shaping it, but I know that is a long slow process. Thanks again for all the advice.

Sincerely,
Stacy
Stacy Anderson

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Stacy,
I am fully committed to this tree, period. I would like to have it out during the summer, but I can take care of it no matter what.
OK, then the best scenario, at least to my way of thinking, is to plan on keeping it outside from this spring on.

The tree will do much better in real sun and is fully capable of surviving a winter with some protection. More on that later, but just so you don't get caught by surprise I do keep mine in an unheated garage from about December through March, about 4 months dormant in a protected location.

Your opportunity to re-pot it will be next spring just prior to it leafing out. Unless there is some sort of serious problem with the soil/drainage I would spend this year learning how to handle it and making sure there are no other issues.

Norm

StacyAnderson
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Location: Tecumseh Michigan

Pictures

Here are the pictures. I have provided a link to them on my facebook page (this is the only way I was able to get it to work). I hope you are able to get a good look at the tree.

[url]https://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=64897&id=100000207576743&l=acce57c7a8[/url]

Thank you.
Stacy
Stacy Anderson

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Stacy,

It's good news that it is pushing new growth and the soil, from what I can see of it, looks good so re-potting should not be your immediate concern. The new growth does look a little spindly and elongated. This is due to its being inside under low light conditions. When you get it outside it should do much better. Make sure to transition it gradually so that you do not burn the tender foliage.

Later this summer a round of pruning will probably be in order. That will remove much of the elongated growth and encourage new, tighter growth.

Norm

StacyAnderson
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Location: Tecumseh Michigan

Pics

Thanks for taking a look !! I am relieved to know that it is doing as well as I had hoped, and your help and advice is really most appreciated. :D
I can't wait to get it outside this spring/summer and see it really take off. Good to know about the pruning, waiting till later in the year.

Sincerely,
Stacy
Stacy Anderson

linlaoboo
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ur FB profile says u r from Houston so outdoors should be nice by now
ficus, maple, elm, juniper, pine

TomM
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Location: Cedarville (SE of Utica) NY, USA

Stacey, If you are in Tecumseh try to contact Jack Wickle in your city. Mr Wickle is a famed bonsaist and a wonderful teacher. Google him. We have been fortunate to have him at bonsai conferences in upstate NY from time to time. He's very informative, patient and funny.

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