bonsaidude
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:55 pm
Location: Connecticut

juniper dormancy

i know that they love outdoors and should be kept outside but i live in ct and can get pretty harsh out there ( were gettin 12 inchs of snow tomorrow to lol). Would it be ok to keep him a very cool room id say close to 50-60 degrees close to a window for some light ( dosent get much northside ) but its gets a decent amount. Or should i try to keep him outside if so how should i go about it in CT at this time of year. some other facts is its a starter tree and will be pruning and cuttin him the way i want when i get it which is today, probally trim him tomorrow and try to wire, 3 year old tree. Open for all suggestions, tips and ideas. thank you ( Update ) ok i thought this would have been alot easier i did alot of reasearch and i know i have been a big pain latley. Heres pics but for what ive learned you pinch the ends with fingers and if you pinch ends that cuase back budding ? but as of now i want to try to clear him out a lil should i take out the stuff that points downwards ? on that main trunk. Also id like to take some offthe stuff off start of the branchs to make it look like a tree a little more ( i was gonna shoot for a karate kid style tree but i think that might be out of guestion since his trunk is already curved to the side ? but what happens if i remove some of the stuff closer to the trunk on the branchs , and the main trunk has some real long branchs that go off it gettin thick to i wont do it all at once but what if i cut one of those back pretty far going to harsh him alot ? Any real good tips on trimmin and pinchin that u have learned ill take becuase every place i look the tell u the same stuff. If u could give website or take min to really explain in detail i will be very very very very very apprecative.


https://img51.imageshack.us/gal.php?g=junip001.jpg

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Gnome
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bonsaidude,

If I understand correctly you just received this tree yesterday. If this is correct then I think I might be cautious with putting it outside as well. Since it's the dead of winter and you may not be aware of how the tree was managed prior to your receiving it, the cool room may be best choice for the rest of this winter.

For future reference, Junipers can withstand your weather if acclimated properly. My Juniper is outside right now under about 20" of snow with more on the way. Actually I'm glad to have the snow as the previous batch had melted. The snow acts as an insulating blanket, trapping the Earths heat.

As for the styling and pruning, what's the hurry? You may be trying to run before you have learned to walk. This is a relatively young plant and some growing time certainly will not hurt it. It all depends upon how much time you want to put into it and what you wish to accomplish.

It looks like it is in a small nursery pot (4" perhaps) Why not spend this year re-potting it into a larger pot to encourage some growth. If you are dead set upon creating a bonsai image this year then you will want to transplant it into a proper bonsai pot. Either way you will want to learn about bonsai soils and re-potting.

Start thinking about what you want from this piece of material. Are you in a hurry to have something that looks like a bonsai or are you willing to spend some time with it first? Spend some time looking at it and studying it. Try to envision different options. Tilt the tree in your hand and imagine it at different angles.

Norm

bonsaidude
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:55 pm
Location: Connecticut

cool well im glad i diddnt get the ok bonsaidude i see i few problems here lol, well i like how you put that idk what my rush was and deff gonna take it into consideration and let him do his thing for a while. Any beef with me repotting him today ? ( ya hes in a 4 inch pot ) cause they gave me a very nice bonsai pot for it bought a kit ( came wit soil) gonna mix the soil he is in now removin a good amount and trimin the roots and mixin in the new sooil ( very grity dirt and looks like little bit of bark ) one main thing i was wonderin tho was my guestion about removing the small bracnchs / new growth from the start of the big branchs ( makin him look like a tree ) close to trunk ya know but if i do that what does that premote more foliage growth, more growth in the trunk or just helps everywhere ?

https://yfrog.com/11junipj ( stuff that came with it )

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djlen
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bonsaidude,

Let me just say this. This is probably the worst time to buy a Juniper if you live in Connecticut or anywhere in the north when you don't know what conditions it came out of.
Junipers do not do well in the house under *ANY* circumstances. Pruning, trimming, wiring, and in my opinion re-potting at this time will stress your little plant and it seems unnecessary. I was much like you when I started out in the hobby. I wanted to get going!!!!! :)
I guess it's your choice as to how you want to go, but if that tree was mine I would be thinking only about how I could acclimate it to the out doors in a gradual way and I wouldn't mess with it until Spring.
I will also say this. Outlets that sell these trees to people at this time of year, in cold locations without basic instructions as to the welfare of the plant are really doing the hobbyist a disservice and I think it's shameful that they operate like this.
If you have a cool room (cold in the 40° area would be better), or shed attached to the house where you could put it at night to acclimatize it to colder temps., that would be the way I'd go with it. I have an attached shed and it rarely goes into the 30's out there.
People don't understand that Junipers suffer in the heat and dryness of an indoor environment. In winter when you've got the heat jacked up that plant is not going to be happy. You will soon start to see a browning of the inner leaves as it starts to dry out.
I hope you will consider this and exercise patience. Find a way to expose it to the cold gradually. It will be happier in a 40° environment than in the house.
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
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bonsaidude
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:55 pm
Location: Connecticut

very nice and i been tryin the patience thing and its hard hahaha but understand tho in what it does and will be doing that. Thank you for the info and i was gonna try to graduly get him use to the outside cuase i did alot of lookin on the fourms before and saw that they don't like inside much but figured it be to much for him to be put right outside ( called place up they kept him in a non heated greenhouse ) so keepin him in now seems to be the deal and gettin him out slowy will be my stride. Anything on that trimmin guestion and what it premotes ?

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djlen
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Knowing that it was in an unheated Greenhouse helps. Can you tell us where the unheated greenhouse is located? That way we can better advise as to how cold hardy it is. Depending on where it was kept, you may be able to move it out of the house sooner. When we know where we can determine how cold it was at night. :)
Trimming will promote branching ramification (finer and more branches) and over all appearance but that's for when the tree is active. You want it to stay inactive until Spring so I'd advise against any trimming/pruning at this time. Concentrate on getting it outside so you'll have something to work with in the Spring.
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
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Gnome
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Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

bonsaidude,

Len has given you sound advice. If you have a way to transition it via a cold garage or screened porch that would be preferable to keeping it inside. I was being cautious before but now that you know it was kept in an unheated greenhouse I feel more comfortable suggesting that.

Removing the inner branches might promote more of a 'bonsai look' but it is shortsighted IMO. One basic concept of bonsai is to make the smallest tree possible out of the stock at hand. So rather than stretch the branches you would be better off compacting them. Note that I am speaking hypothetically, not necessarily about your tree right now.

Again, what do you want from this tree? You bought this as a bonsai so it's understandable that you want to proceed but consider your next moves carefully. If you want a 'bonsai' this year then yes some pruning is in order, later. If you would like to grow it out a bit then pruning, especially the inner branches, is getting ahead of yourself. Your tree, your choice. Just realize that you can't have it both ways.

This is one reason that most enthusiasts have a number of trees at any given time, it's too easy to get carried away and attempt too much too soon if you only have one tree. Come spring there will be one and two gallon Junipers for sale by the millions. If you get a few you can try out different techniques on those.

Norm

bonsaidude
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Posts: 81
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:55 pm
Location: Connecticut

awsome thank you all and will do my best info was perfect ! My method for right now till i can figure out a good place is in that cold room with my trident maple and keepin the window open a crack to keep it chilly in there. i don't have many sheltered places, only one is porch and my dad smokes his cigs out there and im guesin he wont like being suffocated much lol.

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