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maveriiick,

Let me see if I am understanding the situation correctly. You have had two for some time, these have been re-potted this summer and are not doing well. A third is fine and not at issue. Of the two that were re-potted you used the same prepared bonsai mix for both. These are the ones potted in the brown oval pot and the purple plastic one. Is all this correct?

The soil in the ceramic pot looks pretty good from here but you are in a better position to judge it than we are. The soil in the plastic pot looks a little different, but again that may not really be the case.

As I mentioned I am not familiar with this species and I am not encouraging yo to re-pot but if you do I feel I should mention a few things. Bonsai soils are generally soilless but not necessarily 100% inorganic. Most plants will do well in a mix that includes some organic material, this does not mean soil but is usually bark in pieces similar in size to the balance of your mix.

Harry Harrington (Bonsai4me) suggests a basic mix which, to me, implies that bark is included. Not sure how much, one third seems like a place to start. Remember, bonsai soil is all about consistent size, removing the fines and providing excellent drainage.

Norm

SteveP
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If it helps at all, I believe my homebrew greenhouse did my plant the power of good (see thread)... taken it out now due to Daylight Savings Time and the light issue, but the humidity really does seem to have helped.

maveriiick
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I'm trying hydroton on my sageretia now and it had significant root rot (removed rotted roots and treated root ball with hydrogen peroxide). Pellets are 8 to 16 mm in diameter and look like meatballs. Appear to be very stable and durable. I read somewhere that they wick water away from roots and as such need multiple waterings a day (i.e. 3-4 times). I hope it works.

maveriiick
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What is this? Root Nematode?

When I cleaned the roots of root rot, I came across this one root with a large growth on it (about 1 cm diameter). Any idea? It looked like a raspberry, very lobulated but hard like wood. Did a Google search on the closest thing was a ROOT NEMATODE, which does not appear to be a good thing for plants.

[img]https://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq320/victoriiinox/IMG_0699.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq320/victoriiinox/IMG_0701.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq320/victoriiinox/IMG_0702.jpg[/img]

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djlen
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Interesting. What is the consistency of that thing? Is it hard or gelatinous or what?
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
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maveriiick
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It's a Crown Gall

djlen wrote:Interesting. What is the consistency of that thing? Is it hard or gelatinous or what?
It was hard and the consistency of soft-wood, yet kind slimmy, but that could have been the fact that i washed down the roots to clear the soil. I'm thinking this could have been the reason this Sweet plum seemed to be stunted and thrived poorly for so long.

Also came across this info:

https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Agrobacterium

Causes something called a crown gall, which is commonly lethal to plants.

https://gardening.wsu.edu/library/lpro004/lpro004.htm
https://pmo.umext.maine.edu/factsht/Crowngal.htm
https://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/hortnews/node/780

peejay
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maveriiick wrote:To repot this tree into an inorganic medium, would I transfer the root ball with soil surrounding it, or would I clean off all the soils and place in the medium? And water after?
.

I agree with this. All my trees are in an inorganic soil medium now.

I have justtoday re potted a Sagaretia into 100% Pink Cat Litter: [Sophisticat] (NB NON CLUMPING type). Apparently as good if not better than Akadama.

I will feed regularly as I will keep it indoors. window sill.
will let you know how it takes.

good luck

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djlen
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Being from the old school...lol.....I'm not as into this inorganic thing as many are.
I re-potted my Sagaretia into a mix of about 50/50 potting soil/Turface and it's seems to be flourishing in that.
I like the inorganic medium for it's ability to lighten up the soil but unless I'm talking about succulents, I'm just much more comfy with an organic mix.

maveriiik's tree will probably do OK now that he's cut out that tumor. I hope he will keep us posted as to the recovery.
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
_________
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peejay
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Indoor bonsai

Yeh I know inorganic soil is conter intuitive but it does seem simple. If it is effective I am all for simplicity!
Cheers
PJ

maveriiick
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UPDATE: Unfortunately both of the sick trees continued to deteriorate and have died. I can only speculate that my initial care had resulted in their demise (i.e. too much watering). The one remaining tree (two actually as i bought another one) are actually doing extremely well now and I think I understand the watering method which appears to be inconsistent with what is found on websites however.

Most websites suggest constant slight moist soil without too much watering, eg. "Watering: This tree enjoys slightly moist soil, but will wilt and die if allowed to dry out completely. Wilting can be recovered from only by a very healthy tree. Check mositure level everyday with chopstick or bamboo skewer." - https://www.bonsai-bci.com/species/sageretia.html

But my experience has been to let the soil go very dry and water much less frequently. I check the soil and only water when it appears to be bone dry ~ which seems like once a week currently. I do have them under fluorescent lighting with a humidity tray all day.

Therefore, the following bonsai appear to flourish when water is deprived for a short period:

1. Bougainvillea
2. Fukien Tea
3. Sageretia Theezans

Again these are my personal observations.



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