User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Sumo Style Schefflera - Indoor Bonsai

I've always admired David Fukumoto's training/styling of Schefflera arboricola.
He has various approaches, and the one I've come to like most is that which is coined "sumo style":

-short, stout trunks
-powerful surface roots
-low, wide canopy with strong lower branches

Here's how I've begun my journey with plants I hope will ultimately exemplify these "sumo style" characteristics as I grow and shape them into bonsai. A lot of what I'm doing is based on what David Fukumoto has outlined on his website, and thus I feel a need to mention it here---www.fukubonsai.com.

Let the journey begin...
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

To do this right, preparing for a thick trunk with powerful buttressing roots must begin right away...

Planting in relatively shallow (~4" tall) pots provides ample space for growth and encourages roots to extend outward.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May231.jpg[/img]
8" clay bulb pans

To further encourage outward growth/extension of roots, a ~2" layer of pea gravel in the bottom of the pots is formed into a raised mound, which is covered by the round black piece of heavy duty plastic sheeting you see in the photo.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May232.jpg[/img]
Plastic sheeting will prevent the downward extension of roots at/near the center of the rootball.
In other words, the roots will be forced to extend outward.

Next, the soil mix is prepared.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May234.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May233.jpg[/img]
It consists of 6 parts 'cactus mix' to 2 parts perlite to 1 part vermiculite.
And don't forget about the pea gravel which was placed in the bottom of the pot---this will help to enhance drainage.

Next step is to add soil mix around the base of the mound.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May235.jpg[/img]
Note that I've purposely left the very center part of the plastic sheeting visible in the photo so you can more readily see the depth of the soil mix. Only a thin layer of soil mix was then added on top of this plastic sheeting prior to placing plants in the pots.

Starting with young plants is a must...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May23.jpg[/img]
Schefflera arboricola in 6" pots; purchased at Lowes

Here are the plants; individually separated from the first pot.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May236.jpg[/img]

A closer inspection of the rootball on our tallest plant...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May237.jpg[/img]

The same rootball is shown here immediately after pruning off the tap root...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May238.jpg[/img]

Here is what our initial planting looks like...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May239.jpg[/img]

A closer look at the base of this plant reveals petioles (leaf stems) positioned at relatively close internodes...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May2310.jpg[/img]
It is my hope that this will lend itself toward the emergence of multiple growth points when it comes time to perform the first major pruning (trunk reduction). This is vital for the encouragement of a thick trunk and strong lower branching.

[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May2311.jpg[/img]
Here ^^^ you see the 3 plantings I was able to prepare with the 3 pots I had. I plan on preparing 3 additional plantings as soon as I am able to obtain 3 more pots (the ones I got my hands on were the last ones the store had).

Questions/comments welcome! :wink:
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

User avatar
IndorBonsai
Senior Member
Posts: 268
Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 9:15 pm
Location: Seattle area WA

Nice work :) don't forget to trim off some of the top of the tree ( when trimming roots I found it is best to trim about the same amount or more off the top of the tree) it makes it easier for the recently trimmed roots to support the foliage on the top of the tree.

Your doing a awsome job, your going to be the person I ask questions when it is time to do some work to my baby dwarf schefflera.
If your going to have art in your house why not make it living art. :D

Jason

User avatar
majed
Full Member
Posts: 39
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2009 8:50 am
Location: pakistan

very nice story to teach the novice artist,i appreciate it lot. 8)

Imarhil
Full Member
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:07 pm
Location: England, Middlesbrough

Nice work BV... think i may be refering back to this post a few times 8)
Cavo profundus quod imbibo puteus

Acer Buergerianum (seed)
Acer Palmatum (young plant)
Chinese Elm (young Bonsai)

arboricola
Senior Member
Posts: 224
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:07 pm
Location: Minnesota zone 4

BV;

Really enjoying your thread and hope to hear and see more of the work you're doing.

I was a little surprised to see you used gravel in the bottom of your pots. I thought I was the only person that still did that.

Best of luck.

Phil...

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Thanks a bunch for the comments! :D
My next step will be to get them growing and begin fertilizing for a few weeks before making the first major reduction (i.e. chopping the trunk down).

I want them growing as vigorously as possible before cutting them down to 'stumps'!

In the meantime, check out the growing conditions (the lighting, mainly)...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May30.jpg[/img]
Compact fluorescent lighting from above; fluorescent lighting behind them from the kitchen.

[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/May301.jpg[/img]
And plenty of indirect sunlight from west-facing window and patio door.
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Trunking

How far down will you crop the tops of these plants, Im new and my plant is only about 8" tall already. It has some pretty small leaves that I figured I would leave on for the initial plant. I guess I will let them grow a bit like to the height of yours, I don't know and am fearful of cropping them. :lol:
Thanks
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Re: Trunking

Welcome to the forum, mcpre!

You asked about how low to chop...
[Clint Eastwood voice]Well, just how brave are you feeling today, punk?[/Dirty Harry voice] :wink:

I'll be chopping trunks down to about the 1-inch mark (some maybe as low as 1/2"). :shock:

But please, PLEASE do not chop your plant until you've given us some information (such as plant species, how long you've had it, growing medium, condition of plant's growth, goals/plans on future styling, etc.). I highly recommend that you begin your own thread with this information, along with some photos, so that I/we can tailor an answer which is best suited to your particular situation.

I have a lot more information to share based on my research on David Fukumoto's website, but I'd like to hold off on sharing it until it comes time to chop my plants and post photos (probably in the next few days).
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Hi Big Vine, thanks for the quick response. My plants are juveniles and I plan to place 4 plants into a 4" deep rectangular pot, I am trying to get that little forest look. The plants came bunched together in a 4"pot and are very young. I am going to plant them today in the soil and manner you suggested, they are Scheffleras but what type not sure. I also have a Hess Cotoneaster Im going to have a stab at, from what I read this particular type was not mentioned but it has a nice trunk and very small leaves. A juniper is also in the plans, I have had a few of these but I never kept them outside (Ohio). I am making this one and Im not sure if I should leave it out over the winter. 1/2" - 1" crop! :shock:
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

TIME TO CHOP?

Deciding when it is time to do a major trunk reduction is equally (if not more) important as where (or how far down) to make the cut!

Our largest plant of the 3 starters is showing clear signs that it is ready...

First, examine the overall appearance of the plant.
No drooping. No dying leaves. No signs of any other ailments.
There is also an increased 'fullness' compared to when we first started out---evidence that the plant's leaves are extending toward the light.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June4.jpg[/img]

BUT, this alone is not enough to say the plant is actually thriving.
(we need the plant to be thriving prior to making a major trunk reduction)

So what else do we look for?
Closely inspect the growing tip at the apex (top) of plant...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June41.jpg[/img]

Closely inspect any 'exposed' nodes (ones in which leaf stems have been removed and/or are missing)...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June42.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June43.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June44.jpg[/img]

Do these appear healthy? YES
Is there evidence of growth at the apex? YES
Evidence of swelling/emerging buds at exposed nodes (where leaves were removed/missing)? YES

In this case, we have a healthy growing tip which appears to be extending.
This particular plant also has 3 exposed nodes (from where I previously cut off unhealthy leaves) about 3/4 of the way up---all are healthy and appear to be showing signs of growth... It is only a matter of days until we see new leaves/stems growing from these 3 areas.

Rather than sit and watch this growth (which will only force the plant to expend more energy directed at its apex and upper leaves/branches), we will take advantage of the situation (to focus the plant's energy toward development of its base) by making our first major trunk reduction...
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Thanks again for the detailed explanation, it is very helpful. My plants ars young so I will watch them closely to see where they stand. Im also messing with a cotoneaster, which from what I see will need a trunk reduction also. My Scheffleras look great in the pot I planted them in but I want to experiment with the Sumo technique!
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

THE BIG CHOP!!!

This plant wasn't selected by accident...
Look at the abundance of growth points (nodes---where the leaf stems connect to trunk) at the very base of the plant. These will (hopefully) ensure strong branching nice and low, which is right where we want it to be.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June45.jpg[/img]

Here is where the cut will be made:
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June46.jpg[/img]

And here are our 'after' pics:
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June48.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June49.jpg[/img]

Note that the chop site was coated in petroleum jelly.
With any luck, we'll see new growth points appearing within the coming weeks...
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

That is very interesting, I cant wait to get em going!
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Thanks, mcpre...be sure to start a thread with pics for us to see. I'm definitely very interested in seeing how your Schefflera plans develop. 8)

I chopped the other two plants tonight; although not quite as drastically as the first one.
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June9.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June91.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June92.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June93.jpg[/img]

You get the idea.
I might start up a couple more whenever I'm able to find more suitable pots, but for now this is it.

I'll report back on growth once the trees are ready to be chopped again (that is assuming they don't die, of course).
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

I wished I had found this thread before I purchased my plants, they don't have many lower leafs and I think I removed some of the lower ones.
I have to get some digitals and post what I have.
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

mcpre wrote:I wished I had found this thread before I purchased my plants, they don't have many lower leafs
Don't feel bad...this is exactly what happened to me as well!

Why not do as I have done and replace less suitable stock with plants that are more to your liking?
You can keep the first round of plants and use them to practice wiring and pruning.

Think of them as the 'guinea pigs' in this whole experiment...
Each branch you snap (by wiring beyond the limit) or prune off too hastily can be a valuable lesson you learn before it comes time to do wiring and pruning on your more prized plant material.
mcpre wrote:and I think I removed some of the lower ones.
Again, not a problem if you get more suitable stock and use these first-round plants to practice on.

Please understand that I don't mean to discourage you or push you away from staying the course with your current plants. I'm just offering other suggestions on how you could get more suitable stock and also continue to work on this current batch.
mcpre wrote:I have to get some digitals and post what I have.
Please do!
I very much look forward to seeing what you've got.
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Thanks so much. my stock is surviving but I am losing a lot of leaves, probably overwatered. I do have nice new small growth up high on plants. I am still working on getting some pics.
jammin'

User avatar
Stormwatcher
Full Member
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 10:19 pm
Location: Myerstown, PA

Re: THE BIG CHOP!!!

Big Vine wrote: Note that the chop site was coated in petroleum jelly.
What's the purpose of the petroleum jelly?

Haesuse
Senior Member
Posts: 168
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 1:18 am
Location: Birmingham-AL, USA

Re: THE BIG CHOP!!!

Stormwatcher wrote:
Big Vine wrote: Note that the chop site was coated in petroleum jelly.
What's the purpose of the petroleum jelly?
a wound sealant. lowers risk of disease from open wound on plants. i do the same thing, but rub a tiny bit of bleach water on the wound before the jelly.

1 part bleach, 9 parts water.


same reason.
-Zone 7b
-Veggies, succulents, cacti, flowers, and houseplants!

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Hey Bigvine, Ive been out for a while. I lost my original Schef but now have a larger healthier plant. I also lost my Cotoneaster last week. We had a lot of rain and it killed it. I was showing great progress with it too, shame. I will try to take some pics and post them.
jammin'

User avatar
Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

mcpre,
I also lost my Cotoneaster last week. We had a lot of rain and it killed it. I was showing great progress with it too, shame.
This shows the importance of using a free draining mix that is appropriate for your area. If you formulate your mix to allow for the wet times this will not happen. Sure it means more watering during the dry spells but that is better than a dead plant.
I lost my original Schef but now have a larger healthier plant.
Good for you for not giving up, we all kill plants but if you see it as an opportunity to learn something it was not in vain.

Norm

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

HeY Gnome, I used a mix of Verm.. stone and soil for my cotoneaster. I think the rainy week then intense heat did it in. Unfortunately I moved it just days before from a more shady spot to a more sunny spot, I should have left it where it was. By going from pics on the web of a cotoneaster I had a good start going. :cry: I'll have to give it another go.
I now have another Sceff with multiple trunks and plenty of lower leafs in it. I cut off the roots of my earlier specimen too soon, it did not have a tap root yet. I will give this one some time to develop then have it! It is in one of those self watering containers, it has a band hanging from pot plant down into the water pot, maybe this will help me to get it going.
jammin'

User avatar
Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

mcpre,
I used a mix of Verm.. stone and soil
I would seriously rethink that mix. I avoid Vermiculite, preferring Perlite, the texture is so much better for drainage. I even go so far as to sift it to remove the fines. If you do, avoid breathing the dust, once wetted no problem though. Also no actual 'soil' in my pots, ever, not even potting soil. I use bark as my organic component.

Have you seen this?
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3422

If you're reasonably attentive the wick watering method should not be necessary, especially in your climate. I have a Scheff outside and I check it daily as part of my routine. It is in a very free draining mix and even so I do not necessarily have to water it every day. My climate should not be dramatically different from yours.

Norm

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

I actually did use perlite also, I think it was a 25% of all four mix, I like your idea on bark, what do you do to get it to a soil like texture.
Thanks MCPRE.
jammin'

User avatar
Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

mcpre,

I have yet to find a really good, local source of properly sized Pine bark, I try to find the smallest size I can and even then I must size it using a series of screens. The coarse screen helps somewhat to break up the larger pieces. Even so there is much that is simply too large.

Either buy a lot, expecting to use most of it in your landscape or try to find a way to size it. I have even resorted to cutting pieces manually with metal shears. I usually do this over the winter a little at a time in the evenings. I have wondered about the possibility of using an old food processor but have never tried it.

Norm

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

I know it sounds time consuming but I was thinking a heavy grater or the likes.
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Sorry about the losses, mcpre, and sorry for not posting an update before now. :oops:

As you'll see from these photos (taken back in June), the original tree I cut back was recovering nicely from the big chop...
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June93-1.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h109/Big_Vine/Plants/Sumo/June94.jpg[/img]

...but a couple months later I unfortunately made some rather abrupt, careless decisions which led to its demise.

Went on 2 weeks vacation, then came back to find a swarm of what I believe to be fungus gnats flying around all over the place (likely due to the overly-rich, poor-draining soil mix AND the overwatering done by the person caring for the plants while I was away). Tired and frustrated, I carelessly sprayed the plants with some bug repellent I happened to have laying around. :shock:

Next morning the plants looked to be suffering a lot, and the joints where branches met the trunk were all discolored and turned to mush. Even if I could have kept them alive (highly questionable), I would have had major branch losses. This would have defeated the whole purpose of what I was doing with these plants, so I decided to discard them. :cry:

I will NEVER repeat such a careless mistake, and quite frankly I am now a little leery about ever using that bug repellent again---seems like anything which essentially kills a plant overnight might not be the greatest thing to put on your skin. :?

BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

User avatar
djlen
Green Thumb
Posts: 660
Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 12:37 am
Location: Just East of Zone 7a

This has been some really fascinating reading Big Vine. I am really new to the possibilities for styling/shaping indoor plants that this thread has been an education and I followed your link to that Fukubonsai site and am very impressed.
I planted a slew of the dwarf Scheffleras during the summer and they are just not reaching the point for that initial trunk chop that you describe.
Many of my Scheffs. are in 'forest' plantings. I've got one with 9 trees and one with Lord only knows how many.......probably between 15 and 20. :)
I know it's an odd number because of the tradition of planting in odd numbers. But I'll have to count to see how many are in there.
Anyway, I've also got some singles and doubles planted so I'll be trying your technique and see how it goes, and let you know the results.
Thanks for taking the time to make this thread a true inspiration for many of us out here who are almost totally clueless regarding the indoor varieties.

One other thing. For those with patience I would recommend investing in a seed packet for starting Scheffs. It's an inexpensive way to go and the plants I planted in May are now 14" or so tall.
Regards,
Len

"As the twig is bent, so the tree inclines"
- Virgil
"I rarely agree with most of what I say........." -
- Len
_________
How To Post A Picture

mcpre
Full Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:48 pm
Location: columbus

Agree, hey BigVine, I havent been on here for some time too. Sorry about your prospect it was looking fine, gives me a real idea on how to approach things. I have 1 new stock to give it a try again, first time I think my plants were too young, they didnt even have a tap root yet. Ill have to get off of my duff and take some pics of this one, looks like it could be an interesting start. Someone had already chopped it and it has several trunks on it, I don't know if that ruined it or could make for something interesting.
jammin'

User avatar
Big Vine
Senior Member
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon May 04, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Florida - Zone 8b

Thanks Len & mcpre!
I'm glad this thread has been of some help and/or inspiration---I just wish I could have continued it longer.

I'd love to see some Schefflera pics from both of you if you have any to share at some point.

Over the past few months I have been in regular correspondence with David Fukumoto (president and founder of Fuku Bonsai), and I have been learning a great deal about working with Schefflera. I have obtained two plants from him so far, and I have been quite pleased with them.

My next step on here will be to begin a new thread about these plants and about some of the other things I have done to optimize my growing conditions (such as developing a suitable potting mix cheaply, using local materials available in bulk quantities).

See you over in the new thread (whenever I get around to starting it). ; )
BV
Sean
Indoor Grower
Schefflera arboricola
Ficus microcarpa 'Green Island'
Ficus salicifolia 'Willow Leaf'
Portulacaria afra
Pachira aquatica

User avatar
Gnome
Mod
Posts: 5122
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2006 4:17 am
Location: Western PA USDA Zone 6A

BV,

I'm looking forward to your new thread. I have one Schefflera but only minimal experience with them.

Norm

Return to “Indoor Bonsai Forum”