Hellac
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:04 pm
Location: Missouri

Can you still plant veggies?

I asked this in the tomatoes section about tomatoes -

But is it too late to start a vegetable garden? can I still get a decent garden in?

thanks

damethod
Senior Member
Posts: 183
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 4:15 pm
Location: Miami, FL

I'm giving it a shot. It's starting to get very wet as summer is almost here...so, I'm crossing my fingers.

DARK505
Full Member
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 4:47 am
Location: Rio Rancho NM

Look at how long the plants take to grow to thier peak and then figure out when that would be, if it would be mid winter before they are fully grown you may think about something else...

Early girl tomatoes have a 50 day maturity period and thats the shortest time for any of the tomatoes ive seen, the rest are 60-70+ days....

Hopefully you are planting actual plants and not seeds because otherwise you would have to add on the sprouting/gestation period which can vary from 10-20+ days...

jester805
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 2:17 am
Location: IL

I agree. I'm new to gardening, but I'm still planting a few veggies this month. The ground is really wet and it's ok if they bloom a little later than normal. :)

rigardengal
Full Member
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu May 22, 2008 6:13 pm
Location: Rhode Island

And I'm seriously thinking of putting in another raised bed!! I was at a local green house the other day and noticed they had many many plants left, so, if my husband comes through with the bed, I just may have myself more garden space!!!!! (I secretly can't wait till next year!) :wink:

petalfuzz
Green Thumb
Posts: 632
Joined: Sat May 31, 2008 7:37 pm

rigardengal wrote:(I secretly can't wait till next year!) :wink:
He, he! Me too! I'm already planning a permanent (periennel) plot for the side of our house. So far, it'll cost us $200 just for the seeds and plants I want--my DH just said, "Work hard." Yep, it'll be alot of work, though to ammend all that much more soil--eeehhhh. I wish I could do fall plantings, but my preferred website only sells live plants in the spring.

Burnet
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 3:27 am
Location: Pacific Northwest

In addition to getting a late start on a spring/summer garden, you could plan an early start on a fall/winter garden, when things start to cool down a little. I'm thinking of things like leeks, garlic, shallots, brussels sprouts and other cabbage crops, lettuce, peas, etc.

You could also get started on perennials like herbs and I think strawberries.

And of course, there's time for some of the spring/summer crops. I'm gardening in a different climate, so you shouldn't take my word on any of this, but I'm sure that there are a lot of things that you can plant. Whenever practical, I would recommend starting with plants rather than seeds, to make up some time.

It appears that you're in Missouri. The University of Missouri Extension website has a page with a link to a planting calendar:

https://extension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06201.htm

They suggest planting dates for a lot of crops, though I admit that I find some of them a little puzzling.

Burnet

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

WOW! An inveterate information-seeker and map lover, I just *had* to look at the Missouri planting guide.

I'm very GLAD I did. This document sets forth a lot of information that I've seen people ask for on this forum (and others):

--How much should I plant for fresh food per person?
--How much for canned/frozen?
--What kind of soil will XYZ variety [or "can I persuade XYZ variety to..."] grow in?

and so on.

I liked the climate zone map: Northern, Central, and Southern Missouri, too. Even though "Northern" is assigned to some areas in the southern portion of the state, the first page states that this is b/c it's the Ozark Plateau, whose elevation brings a later spring and earlier fall, thus making the growing season equivalent to that of (true) Northern Missouri.

Little nuggets of information like these make it worthwhile to look at "stuff don't need to know." And it gives a great picture of our nation (and, if I can find anything like this for Canada, our continent) on a smaller scale than is usually available.

Thank you.

Cynthia H.
USDA Zone 9/Sunset Zone 17

MaryB
Full Member
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:21 am
Location: MA

petalfuzz wrote:
rigardengal wrote:(I secretly can't wait till next year!) :wink:
He, he! Me too! I'm already planning a permanent (periennel) plot for the side of our house. So far, it'll cost us $200 just for the seeds and plants I want--my DH just said, "Work hard." Yep, it'll be alot of work, though to ammend all that much more soil--eeehhhh. I wish I could do fall plantings, but my preferred website only sells live plants in the spring.
I just read your message and wanted to give my input :lol: I just started 4 perrenial gardens in our yard and thought I would go broke doing it. Finallt I went to all my neighbors that were into gardening and asked for cuttings or rooted specks of their plants. Everyone was happy to help.
It thins out their plants for more growth and helps me ad to an all but barren garden.
The plants take a few days to get back on their feet but all are doing well and I cant help but be anxious for next spring to see how they have all doubled.
Good Luck and go see the neighbors!!!!!!

Hellac
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:04 pm
Location: Missouri

Thanks for all the help and the link - everything is looking good :)

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