pointer80
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Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Hello everyone, I noticed some light leaves on some of my tomato plants new growth and was wondering if this was just because it's new growth or is there something more going on? Thanks.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

No, not normal. Looks like you are starting to get a little bit of chlorosis, which is a sign of nutrient deficiency.
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pointer80
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

rainbowgardener wrote:No, not normal. Looks like you are starting to get a little bit of chlorosis, which is a sign of nutrient deficiency.
Thank you, What is the best way to treat this? I have these growing in fox farm's happy frog organic potting mix.

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applestar
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Yellowing could occur from overwatering too.... How did you prepare the solo cups for drainage?

FYI - My standard method is to use scissors and cut three straight pieces from the bottom “corner” - this avoids having holes in the bottom then blocking drainage by sitting the cups on the holes, then cut double slits halfway up the side with a box cutter in three places along the perimeter. I find that tall drink cups can get soggy on the bottom while nearly dry on the top so the double slit supplies air to the roots (I got this idea from the SIP -sub-irrigated planter- design).
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Gary350
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Chlorosis is a condition in which leaves produce insufficient chlorophyll caused by poor soil and made worse by high ph soil. The affected plant may die unless treated. Chlorosis may be corrected by supplemental feedings of iron, in the form of a chelate or sulphate, magnesium or nitrogen compounds in various combinations.

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applestar
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

I haven’t used the Happy Frog Organic Potting mix — but have used Happy Frog Ocean Forest mix in the past, and it was a great product, so I would be surprised if it is a nutrient issue ...unless it’s been over a month since they were Uppotted in this mix.

The nutrient uptake can be interrupted when the mix is waterlogged and become anaerobic. That’s why I asked.

Interesting list of needful nutrients that Gary350 listed — I have heard that quick fix for chlorosis is (could be reversed by) applying Epsom salts solution — 1 tsp per quart or 1Tbs per gallon of water. Epsom salts is magnesium sulfate and would supply the magnesium and sulfur. This is one instance in which I would use a salt-based “fertilizer”.

Another quick fix I have heard for waterlogged/anaerobic soil to oxygenate is to apply hydrogen peroxide — the way I heard is one drop straight 3% peroxide next to seedlings and 20% solution as soil drench for larger plants. I had a formula for making the 20% solution somewhere from the 3% peroxide you buy from the store, but can’t remember it/find it now. 1 part 3% peroxide to x parts water.... ?

...WAIT! I may be remembering wrong... maybe it was 1 part 3% peroxide in 19 parts water? 20 parts total? — what % solution would that make?
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applestar
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

...maybe it’s this? The technobabble lost me but if someone could interprete, this might be the source of the info I read somewhere....

US3912490A - Plant and soil oxygenating composition and method - Google Patents
https://patents.google.com/patent/US3912490
Description
United States Patent 1 Bo'ghosian [451 Oct. 14, 1975 22 Filed:

[ PLANT AND SOIL OXYGENATING COMPOSITION AND METHOD [76] Inventor: Malcolm P. Boghosian, 4632 Cerritos Drive, Long Beach, Calif. 90807 Jan. 14, 1974 21 Appl. No.: 433,395

[52] US. Cl. 71/28; 71/63; 71/64 SC [51] Int. C1. C05C 9/00 [58] Field of Search 71/1, 28, 29, 30, 31, 35,

71/48, 49, 53, 63, 64 SC; 260/553 R, 555 R, 555 C, 610 R, 610 C; 423/579, 582; 252/186 Primary Examiner-Frank A. Spear, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Ferris H. Lander Attorney, Agent, or FirmMartin A. Voet ABSTRACT A method for oxygenating plant roots and soil by contacting the plant roots, soil and/or support media adjacent to the plant with a composition comprising an effective amount of urea peroxide or hydrogen peroxide, or compositions of the above in combination with the macronutrients and micronutrients needed for plant growth.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Chlorosis due to iron deficiency is usually at the base of the leaves near the stem, which is what yours looks like.

Possible causes of chlorosis include poor drainage, damaged roots, compacted roots, high alkalinity, and nutrient deficiencies in the plant. Nutrient deficiencies may occur because there is an insufficient amount in the soil or because the nutrients are unavailable due to a high pH (alkaline soil). Or the nutrients may not be absorbed due to injured roots or poor root growth. If the condition is not corrected, it can eventually lead to stunting or even death of the plant.

You can get iron supplements for your plants. You should check the pH of your potting mix. And as applestar mentioned, be sure your soil is well draining.
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pointer80
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

applestar wrote:Yellowing could occur from overwatering too.... How did you prepare the solo cups for drainage?

FYI - My standard method is to use scissors and cut three straight pieces from the bottom “corner” - this avoids having holes in the bottom then blocking drainage by sitting the cups on the holes, then cut double slits halfway up the side with a box cutter in three places along the perimeter. I find that tall drink cups can get soggy on the bottom while nearly dry on the top so the double slit supplies air to the roots (I got this idea from the SIP -sub-irrigated planter- design).
I prepared my cups by cutting two pieces from the bottom of the cups and also I drill a hole in the bottom of the cup as well. I have only had them up potted for about two weeks.

pointer80
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

I would also like to ad that this is only occurring on about 3 to 6 plants out of about 60 or 70 plants so far and they were all up potted around the same time and all in happy frog potting soil. I did post pictures of some stem damage in another post so maybe that's got something to do with it, I don't know if these are the same plants? They might have root damage? Could I carefully take the cup off one tomorrow to see if the roots are developing properly?
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Gary350
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Another thing to consider is, nutrients in soil may be locked up and not available to plants. Lime will unlock nutrients and make it available for plants. Add pellet lime it may help and I would still add nitrogen sulfate since that is what the plants seem to really need. I often keep a 5 gallon bucket of water in my garage I throw all the kitchen metal cans in the water also, nails, wire, & any other metal that will rust into the water. Rusty water is a good supply of iron for plants. Wood ash is loaded with nutrients, Lime, P&K, it is excellent for tomatoes an many other plants.

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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Two things have been noted: be sure you have drainage holes in the bottom of the cups and the plants are showing signs of nutrient deficiency. My solutions is pretty simple: poke a few holes in the bottom of the cups and let the soil dry out between waterings and add some liquid plant food the next time you water. The yellowing of the leaves is very slight at this time and a little fertilizer will green them up quickly. Too much water can cause "damping off" and the stems will shrivel and the plant will die.

You have to be close to planting outside. If you putting them into the ground and it is healthy, the plants will rebound. If they will be planted into pots be sure to have drainage in the pots and every ten days or so add nutrients since containers will have the nutrients flushed out because of the watering cycles.
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

Sorry, I just can't let this go: ". Lime will unlock nutrients and make it available for plants" That totally depends on what the pH of your soil is now. Both very acid soil and even moderately alkaline soil can lock up nutrients. If your soil is very acid (pH less than 5) or even slightly alkaline (pH more than 7.5 or 8; 7 is neutral), it can lock up the nutrients in your soil, making them unavailable to plants. So if your soil is very acid, adding lime will indeed make the nutrients available. I have never lived anywhere with soil that acid. If the soil is even very close to neutral (say 6.5), adding lime could push it towards lock up status. If your soil is already slightly alkaline, adding lime will definitely make the problem much worse.
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pointer80
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Re: Is this normal for new growth or something more?

I checked today and a couple of my tomatoes that I planted in my own compost/aged alpaca manure mix also has this so that is two different soil mediums so I just cant see two different soil mixes having the same nutrient deficiencies, but maybe. Like I said in a previous post the soil I am using is happy frog which is supposed to be some awesome stuff. I have only had these up potted in the cups for about 2 weeks so they should not have used up all the soils nutrients yet. I will watch the watering more closely and put more holes in cups. Thanks.

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