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NewRiverGeorge
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Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

Hello everyone,

Doing some planning for spring and was wondering if any of you add anything to the soil when you transplant your seedlings? I was thinking of something along the lines of Jobe's Fast Start:
https://jobescompany.com/product/jobes- ... rettyPhoto

What, if anything, do you use?

Thanks in advance,

NRG

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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

I was actually debating that this year after reading "Teaming With Microbes"


Heres a clip from a website about that,

There are two main categories of mycorrhizae relationships: Endomycorrhizal fungi (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) form relationships with over 90% of plants (including turf grasses). Ectomycorrhizal fungi form relationships with only about 2% of plants, but some of them are quite common.

Please note that there are a few plants that do not respond to either endo or ectomycorrhizal fungi, namely members of the brassica family (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, kale, and rutabaga); members of the Ericaceae family (rhododendron and azalea, blueberry, cranberry, heath and heather, huckleberry, lingonberry), as well as beets, mustard, spinach, and orchids.




And another from Ali's Organics

Using Soluble & Granular Mycorrhizae

Posted October 08, 2013

Using Mycorrhizae has some very important step to success. When used incorrectly, you can easily kill the beneficial fungi and bacteria.

First off, always look for a expiration date to insure you have a living product. Never except out of date products. They will still be viable for several months past their date, but they will degrade and you will need to use more with time. It best to use them up quickly before they become expired. Store Mycorrhizae in a cool place.

Soluble Mycorrhizae is not intended to apply to plants leaves. It should be used as a soil drench, diluted in clean (non-chlorine) water. Chlorine kills fungus and bacteria ! That's just what your Mycorrhizae is.

Granular Mycorrhizae can be added into each transplant hole of whatever plant, tree or shrub your are planting at the rate of 1/4 teaspoon for 1 gallon plants. It can also be added to seed beds as a general broadcast or directly in each trench.



When making compost tea add Mycorrhizae at the end of the brewing process just before drenching the soil. Mycorrhizae more than likely won't survive the brewing process. While compost tea is great sprayed on the leaves of plants, but only drench or spray the soil when you have added mycorrhizae in your tea.

Using synthetic fertilizers (especially fast-acting liquids) can harm microbial activity in the soil, which create fertilizer-dependent plants.

Soluble Mycorrhizae can be used as a seed soak. Generally using 1/4 teaspoon per gallon water, soaking up to 24 hours. This promotes rapid germination and root growth.

Spraying the drip line of established trees and shrubs or the root balls just before planting will boost the overall health of your long time investment.

Flowers and vegetables will have better production when using mycorrhizae. They also become more resilient to pest and diseases as well.

Mycorrhizae stimulates and energizes the living soil. Plants are able to take up water and nutrients better when there is mycorrhizal activity.

Mycorrhizae can be used on established plants, when planting transplants, or seed beds. It is great when added to potting soils.

Mycorrhizae needs the presence of roots for the spores to germinate and attach to, otherwise they will remain dormant in the soil.

Our opinion of tilling the soil will not harm microbes in the soil as long as you do not "over" till the soil. A slight "fluff" up once a year should be sufficient.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

Compost.
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MoonShadows
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

I start all my seeds in a soilless mix. Once I move them outside, I use compost. If it is indoor kitchen garden, where I grow in a soilless medium, I used to give them a dose of organic fertilizer after the first true set of leaves appeared, but since I bought my Happy Leaf LED Grow Light, I don't feed my indoor kitchen garden at all.
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PaulF
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

I dig a hole, put in the seedling, put the dirt back in the hole and water the soil around the seedling.
Paul F

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applestar
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

It wasn’t quite clear to me — what Kind of seedlings and transplant to where? Larger seedling containers (which I call uppotting) or to their permanent spot in the garden and/or container?

To some extent, it depends on the kind of plant since their needs maybe different, but generally if I’m going to be growing them in the house a little while longer until they are finally planted out, then I don’t give them too much fertilizer yet. I do use potting mix with mycos and worm castings (or compost if accessible).

For their final planting out, I think it depends HUGELY on how much you prepare the overall garden soil before planting. I agree I generally add compost and/or wormcastings at planting time but I usually also would have prepped with dolomitic lime, rock phosphate, greensand or seaweed, maybe soaked alfalfa pellets/meal, USG (used coffee grounds)... maybe organic fertilizer for heavy feeders.....
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NewRiverGeorge
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

My apologies, I should have clarified what types of plants and garden conditions. The seedlings would be tomatoes and peppers transplanted into the garden this coming spring. I use crimson clover and rye as a cover crop.

Last year I tried to get creative and placed 10-10-10 fertilizer in the hole with my transplants. Needless to say I lost a lot of great plants early on last year. I don't want to repeat that mistake, but would like to give my plants the best start I can.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

The 10-10-10 would have been OK if you didn't over do it and mixed it well with the soil. Just dumping it in the bottom of the hole wouldn't work, as you apparently found out.

But fertilizer does not turn bad soil into good soil. Tomatoes and peppers (and pretty much everything else), likes a good rich organic soil, moist but well draining. So I am constantly adding organics to my soil. I put compost over the whole bed before I plant and mix it in. Then I add a little more in the planting hole, mixed in. You cannot over do compost, the way you can with fertilizer, it is low concentration and slow release. Then I keep the soil well mulched all the time and the mulch gradually breaks down to feed the soil.
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

rainbowgardener wrote:The 10-10-10 would have been OK if you didn't over do it and mixed it well with the soil. Just dumping it in the bottom of the hole wouldn't work, as you apparently found out.

But fertilizer does not turn bad soil into good soil. Tomatoes and peppers (and pretty much everything else), likes a good rich organic soil, moist but well draining. So I am constantly adding organics to my soil. I put compost over the whole bed before I plant and mix it in. Then I add a little more in the planting hole, mixed in. You cannot over do compost, the way you can with fertilizer, it is low concentration and slow release. Then I keep the soil well mulched all the time and the mulch gradually breaks down to feed the soil.
I totally agree with the organic matter.
I just read a study that was published a way back, I believe it was 2010, anyhow the argument was that adding fertilizers to the soil did not harm microbes in the soil, the study (over 40 years) showed that while the fertz did not harm the soil microbes what it did do, was increase the microbe activity to a point where the organic matter broke down much quicker thus reducing the soil's ability to store organic nitrogen.

“Fertilizer is good for the father and bad for the sons.


google (if interested)
"Synthetic nitrogen destroys soil carbon, undermines soil health"

But I'm still curious and intrigued after reading Teaming With Microbes. they suggest spraying the roots with something prior to planting to assist in the Mycorrhizzal... oh hell let me just post this from another website, they explain it better.

What is Mycorrhizal Applications?

As the world’s leading manufacturer and supplier of mycorrhizal soil inoculants, MA researches, produces, and markets mycorrhizal fungi which accelerate plant strength by greatly increasing the surface absorbing area of roots, producing a healthier root system. These specialized fungi colonize plant roots to create a symbiotic root-and-mycelial network within the surrounding soils, increasing efficiency in nutrient and water absorption to optimize plant health and vigor. MA’s MycoApply line of mycorrhizal inoculants is utilized by landscapers, farmers, forest nurseries, restoration & erosion control specialists, greenhouses, soil media manufacturers, and professional horticulturalists to maximize plant success and improve return on investment


So does anyone think this would be a benefit? Or do you think its hype? I figured it's not needed for a healthy soil but couldn't hurt.
It is sold in
  • (Endo) 4 species Endomycorrhizae 60,000 Propagules per lb
  • (Endo and Ecto) 4 species Endo & 7 species Ecto 60,000 Endo & 110 million Ecto Propagules per lb.
  • (All Purpose) 9 species Endo & 7 species Ecto 30,000 Endo & 140 million Ecto Propagules per lb. 5 Species beneficial bacteria and a slow release organic fertilizer 3-1-1
It is sold in Liquid and Granuals
its called MycoApply

To the OP, don't mean to hijack but figured this pertained to your original question.

PaulF
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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

The answer I gave above is predicated on the idea that a soil test is performed by a qualified soils laboratory and the suggestions are followed so that the entire gardening area is healthy and in balance for optimum growth of seedlings no matter where they are placed. The balance of the major players, N,P, and K plus micronutrients and organic matter is key. When all is in balance and the levels of nutrients are good, nothing else but sufficient water and sun and temperatures has been needed in my space for excellent results. Production and quality could always be better but there is a point of diminishing returns and no place to go with the excess.
Paul F

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Re: Do you add anything when planting seedlings?

agree with the organics. I row mulch with my grass clippings all summer. the neighbors who do not use weed killers also "donate" their clippings. the trash man has not seen a bag of grass in a few years now. in the fall I cover the whole plot with whatever leaves, pine needles, and other yard "waist" is on the curb. the leaves get a good soaking as it gets windy here, and the neighbors do not want their leaves back. all year I am throwing any kitchen waist out there too. anything from coffee grounds to egg shells. and during harvest, all the pods, husks, cobs, shells, and stalks go in there too.

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