james751993
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:45 am
Location: Sydney

New tomato leaves turning yellow :(

I was wondering if I could have some questions answered.

I planted out my tomatoes about 3 weeks ago, they were doing well up until recently. I have two types; rouge de marmande and roma. One of the marmandes has developed a yellow discolouration in the newest leaves and the roma tomatoes are showing a bit of bubbling on the new leaves between the veins. Is the bubbling normal for new leaves? the roma tomato leaves (the new ones) have shown yellowing too but not as bad as the marmande. I treated the affected plants with an iron chelate suppliment to see if it would make a difference.. That was a week ago and still no change.

The garden soil was prepared adequately with plenty of manure and compost.

Would anyone know whats going on?? Thank you! :)
Attachments
This is the roma tomato with the leaf bubbling. Notice the slight yellowing? Normal?
This is the roma tomato with the leaf bubbling. Notice the slight yellowing? Normal?
This is the rouge de marmande. Notice chlorosis is only present on new leaves
This is the rouge de marmande. Notice chlorosis is only present on new leaves

imafan26
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Posts: 11273
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: New tomato leaves turning yellow :(

It looks like a nutritional deficiency. Organic or conventional fertilizer, you have to balance your inputs. Compost and things like chicken manure are very alkaline. Unless your soil is very acidic it can make an already alkaline soil worse, especially for acid loving plants.

It looks like an iron deficiency. Tomatoes will show yellow at the base fo the youngest leaves first then chlorosis will spread depending on the severity of the deficiency.

Iron should correct it, but do not use ironite. It is made from tailings. Sometimes it is not the lack of iron or any other element in the soil, but a pH that is not optimal. In soils with a high pH, micronutrients are less available as they are bound to other particles.

Low pH soils can also bind elements. In the case of acidic soils, phosphorus binding may be a problem. Phosphorus is mostly bound in soils with just a small amount available to plants in solution. Usually the phosphorus is bound to calcium. The P-Ca form is the more soluble form. In very acid soils phosphorus will bind to aluminum and iron more permanently.

Get at least a baseline soil test. Ask for organic recommendations and they will advise you how much compost, manure, and pH correction you need to do to keep the soil balanced for what you want to grow. If you have master gardeners available they can tell you how to collect a soil sample and where to take it. They will also help you interpret the results.

When your plants show deficiencies or toxicity it is usually because of imbalances in the soil. The goal of organic should be to feed the soil. If the soil is in balance, then the soil feeds the plants. To feed the soil, you still need to balance inputs and put the right plant in the right place. Organic requires constantly adding organic matter to the soil. Usually a lot of compost frequently from multiple sources. Organic fertilizers and crop rotation.

Most back yard growers don't rotate much because of limited space, but they can rotate crops within a year. For a soil to be sustainable, most of the nutrients must come from the soil. If plants are dependent on continuous inputs or fertilizer or water to be maintained, then the soil really isn't being fed properly.

https://www.haifa-group.com/knowledge_ce ... _symptoms/
https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department ... /agdex6607
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

james751993
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 10:45 am
Location: Sydney

Re: New tomato leaves turning yellow :(

Thanks for all that helpful info! :) Ill definitely be looking back at this post in the near future for my other vegetables. Thankfully here in Australia our soils arent particularly alkaline.. We usually suffer from pH levels close to about 5... So I always have dolomite at the ready.

I did a bit more digging (pun not intended) and found that The marmande might have a disease called pith necrosis :( first symptom is chlorosis of the youngest leaves, then external and internal browning of the stem :( which I just noticed today..

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