TareqPhoto
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Sweet corn planting

I did plant sweet corn seeds few weeks ago, and the seeds most of them germinated and sprouted, but, it didn't take them long enough or say they reached about 1 or 2 inches then they died completely all of them, so i really don't know what caused the death, soil is good and i water it regularly, maybe water it everyday killed it? the weather is not hot, not much warm in the early morning these days but in the afternoon it is really warm enough nearly 28-34C.

I planted them in pots or say container [i don't know the difference], rectangular one, i remember i placed 2 seeds in each hole, did that caused to not grow good enough? should i place only 1 seed in each hole i dig in soil? i tried to make nearly 4-5 inches apart, but i can understand if they never grow high than 5-10 inches later, but to die so soon even not reach higher than 2 inches means there is something wrong, do you have some tips or solutions to what may cause this problem?

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Sweet corn planting

You planted your corn seeds in containers. Indoors? With lights? Outdoors? What kind of soil/ potting mix/ growing medium was in the containers? Watering every day may or may not have been too much, depending on the soil type, size of containers, amount of light, etc. I prefer watering seedlings from the bottom. So the containers (usually small pots) sit in a tray and I put A LITTLE bit of water in the bottom of the tray, just enough to touch the bottom of the pots so the soil can wick up water.

I know we had two different people write in from UAE saying they had planted their container plants in pure peat moss. I don't think that was you, but I don't know if it is common there. Anyway, it doesn't work. Both those people also had dead plants.

Photos always help to try to diagnose problems. In the meantime, you could tell us more about how the little corn seedlings looked before they were dead. Did they shrivel up? Wilt? Fall over and lie flat on the soil?
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Re: Sweet corn planting

I don't know how to answer all those or to give better details to get the truth after all.

- I planted my seeds in containers outdoor, i think without light or in shade.
- The soil i used is the mix between a pure sand [orange or red one] and potting soil[peat moss maybe] and sewage treated fertilizer.
- I didn't know your last words as i feel they all the same, but let's say they wilt or turned brown slowly then completely within days then fall over lie flat on the soil, and when i removed it it came out as if they weren't planted in the soil at all, so i planted new seeds but this time i did put only one seed in each hole and a bit deeper maybe 2 inches, but i remember i did dig them deep nearly 1.5inches maybe but i placed 2 instead of 1 in each hole.

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Re: Sweet corn planting

Here are the photos of the containers i used for planting the seeds, the soil is before watering it

-The brown container inner dimension is 6inches wide and nearly 20inches long, and the soil is taking up to 4inches depth while the container is about 6inches total hight.

- The white container inner dimension is nearly 6.5inches wide and 17inches long, and same as brown container for depth used with soil about 4inches out of 6inches.

You can see how is the soil used in those containers, and if you can look closely, you can see that little brown of that dead sweet corn seedlings to the edges.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

And this is for both containers after watering
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Ummm.... I have to ask, just in case. Those containers do have holes in the bottom don't they?

I think you gave us a clue when you said they fall flat and then it's like they aren't planted at all (i.e. they have no root system left).

I think your corn seedlings "damped off." Damping off is a fungal disease that young seedlings are very vulnerable to, especially in conditions of too much moisture and too little air circulation. Being outside the air circulation should not be an issue, but your potting mix may have been staying too damp too much of the time and/or you may have been over-watering.

It is a little tricky with young seedlings. They can't dry out or they die, but they can't stay too wet or they die. You have to find that balance of keeping them just damp all the time. That's why I do bottom watering.

Here's an image of seedlings with damping off fungus:

Image
https://hort.uwex.edu/files/2014/10/Damping-Off.png

Notice the stems at the base get very thin and pinched in and a little brownish. At that point it is bending over, because the thinned stem can't support it. After that the stem gets eaten all the way through by the disease and the seedling ends up lying flat on the soil, no longer connected to the roots, and therefore dead.

Unfortunately damping off cannot be cured and by the time the seedlings are bending over, they are probably goners. But it can be prevented, with proper water management. One thing that helps is to put a pinch of cinnamon powder in the water you water with. Cinnamon is a natural anti fungal. But basically you have to insure that your potting mix is very well draining and that you don't over-water.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Ok, yes, those containers do have holes in the bottom.

Now, how i can bottom watering them? just put those containers in bigger trays and just put the water in those trays so the water go from the bottom inside the containers? I am not sure how wide are the holes in the bottom, but i think they are very small that are barely can allow much water to be drained out, now those containers already filled with soil, i can't break the holes bigger or stretch them more unless i make some of the soil out and the seeds may get damaged then.

First test failed, i was happy when i saw the seed sprouted, i didn't believe how fast it did, so i hope this second try can go longer or more successful, i will watch it until it sprout then i better keep posting pics in every stage as an update here, then you can tell if everything alright or what is wrong.

Side question, if the plant grow up high good or if i can transplant it to the ground, then when the plant can produce the fruit[the corn] how many one plant can produce?

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Re: Sweet corn planting

I am sorry, corn is not a container plant. It is a large plant. The roots go six feet wide and 4 feet deep. You also need a stand of corn so that it gets pollinated properly. A 12 foot by 12 foot plot with rows every thirty inches and plants every 8 inches in the rows is a minimum planting.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Well, i was testing to see if any plant can germinate in pots or containers.

And second, i was planning to transplant any plant from containers or pots to the ground in my garden once the plant reach a proper height, around 1-2 foot, then in the ground permanently.

In my other thread asking about starting gardening i did upload pics of my garden selected area plan, and i included a spots for sweet corn, and with dimensions as illustration, but didn't get any reply yet, i didn't mention my selected area total dimensions, but i think i have enough space to plant some seedlings enough, i am still open for suggestions and most plants that grow high or tall definitely will be translated or grown in the garden's ground.

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Re: Sweet corn plantingCor

Add compost or peat moss to your garden area. Spread about 10 cm evenly over the top and till it into the soil. It will help aerate and retain water. Fertilize with a starter fertilizer. Whatever is available to you but preferably with low number like 10-10-10, 6-4-6, 6-12-12 I would use maybe 200 ml per 9 square meters. I would also add a half cup of sulfur. I am assuming your soil is somewhat alkaline and sandy. Water everything well and deeply so the soil will be moist at least 4-6 inches down.

Wait a couple of weeks for the fertilizer to start working, a month would be better. Keep the soil moist but not soggy. You could add 4-6 inches of straw on the top as mulch to keep the weeds from sprouting and help retain the water.

Corn seeds are better planted directly in the soil, they grow fast and they don't like to be disturbed. Move the mulch to expose rows of soil that are 50 cm apart. Plant the corn seeds about 15 cm apart, you can drop one or two seeds in each hole. I push the seed in with my finger up to the knuckle. Firm the seeds in and maintain even soil moisture. you need at least 4 rows of corn to get good pollination. Corn must be planted in a block and not in a single row.

Seeds will usually germinate in 7-10 days. Fertilize again when the plants are 4 -6 inches tall with sulfate of ammonia 100 ml over 9 sq meters. Cultivate lightly to work the fertilizer into the soil. Repeat when the plants about 5-6 weeks old.
Corn is a heavy nitrogen feeder, but nitrogen can cause dampening off or prevent germination if there is too much in the beginning. Nitrogen is volatille and is lost quickly and too much at one time will burn the plants. Dividing the nitrogen into smaller applications provides a more steady supply of nitrogen and is less likely to burn. Corn is ready to harvest 10 days after the tassels appear. The ears should be filled and the juices when you pinch the kernal should be thin not thick and milky.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

It's true corn needs warmer soil to germinate, otherwise, they are susceptible to fungal diseases. Some varieties are more resistant than others, and some are bred to germinate at cooler temps.

When growing in large plots, it's much more labor saving to sow directly in the ground. For me, since I only grow in smaller "blocks" or groupings -- typically no more than about 24-48 plants, I like to pre-germinate the seeds indoors to make sure they are all at about the same development, and to get a jump on the season sometimes. I also grow extra seedlings and transplant same size ones in an equidistantly planted block, multiple rows, or double concentric circle -- for best wind pollination -- and/or hand pollinate them.

This thread probably describes a good representative seed-starting process. I think there might be some others, and the later corn growths and harvest might have been recorded in other threads.

Subject: 2014 pre-germinating/sprouting experiment Peas, Corn, Curcs
applestar wrote:Bumping this thread as reminder to myself and others in my planting zone that it's almost time again to start pre-germinating corn and squash, etc.

Reviewing this thread, it looks like I also pre-germinated peas to direct sow about this time last year, but this year, I already started some inside that are a month old, 3-4" tall and ready to plant with several true leaves. (I'll add the link for that thread later)

It's good to know I can still sow some peas though (as long as the spring weather is going to be like last year) since I have a lot more seeds.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

" I am not sure how wide are the holes in the bottom, but i think they are very small that are barely can allow much water to be drained out,"

This is your problem. Poor drainage is keeping your soil too damp too much of the time.

Corn is usually planted directly where it will grow, but it can be started in containers for transplant.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

If the soil temperature is at least 21C, then their is no need to start indoors. People start seeds indoors to get a jump on their short seasons and it requires careful attention to watering, light and temperature.

In warm climates it is always better to start the seeds in the ground. They will grow faster and stronger than growing them in pots first. If you just want to test the quality of the seeds you can germinate 10 in a wet paper towel just to see if the seeds are good.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Ok, now we are almost in a not warm season, the weather is cold at night until very early morning until the sunrise, then it is little warm not much hot but with nice wind, and the temp is not getting high or higher than 28C even in the middle of the day when the sun is in the top middle of the sky, so it means i shouldn't plant anything outdoor yet?

Also the ground is cold in the morning, it is really cold, not as cold as where you all live, but it is way colder than the summer, 15-18C in the morning compared in summer 28C in early morning, and at night it is again cold, so maybe the plants don't feel warm at all then.

I think i did test enough seeds in pots and containers, most did germinate fine, but some died and some keep growing, in this case i just stop germinating more or starting over again when failed, and i have to focus on my garden area to prepare it so then i can make it ready for direct sow/plant and then i don't look back for transplanting or worry about how enough space/room for seedlings in pots/containers for their growth.

Are there any videos links about how to repair/prepare the grounds if they are not yet good or ready for plantation? i feel i don't understand your steps or materials to be used, you keep say mulch, i don't know what is it, and if it prevents the weeds from growing will it prevent another plants from growing too? Also if i dig deep to remove those weeds/grass from root how come they may come out if i remove from roots or i go deep say minimum 8 inches say nearly 12inches[1ft]? I will take another pics of that area where i asked the person to start digging and cleaning, you will have an idea how it looks like and what to do, I don't know how deep is that soil and the ground in my garden, but if there are trees already in back yard and some trees not very high in this side yard it means the ground is good enough for planting.

Well, from my plan drawing, i did mention a sweet corn in one row, but i didn't mention anything in next row to it, maybe i should use 2 rows then for sweet corn, i can also use that row mentioned for lettuce to be use for sweet corns too, so 3 rows in order, will this be enough to create a small or start block then? i don't want to use entire or more than 70% of that area only for sweet corn, if it is a must then i have no choice but to use 70% of it for sweet corn and then i expand that selected area to another place so i can plant something else, tomatoes for me is very very important, so that i chose the first 2 rows for 2 types of tomatoes.

Also, i still didn't know what trees are there that is very close to the wall, if they are not necessary or unwanted then i can simply remove and then the area will be larger for planting, i may keep sweet corn row in blocks to the wall towards the middle of the area, the the rest with something else.

Also you didn't tell me about what is the minimum amount of sweet corn plants i should grow for pollination and assure it will grow fine? say you have almost same that area i have, about 5 meter by 6 meter for example, how you use it if you have few plants to grow including sweet corn?

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Re: Sweet corn planting

I don't discourage very often. But. To be honest, you might be better not to try growing sweet corn this year if you don't have a big area to devote to it, and if you have limited fertile or starting with less than ideal soil. Also as a beginning gardener, corn is a bit tricky in limited space.

I like to try growing some every year to improve my techniques and to trial varieties to find ones that are worth the effort. But I have to tell you it's taken me 4-5 yrs.

As reference, I would say I plant 4 per 1m in staggered double row spaced about 20-25cm apart (8 plants). The double rows are spaced wide enough to walk between -- not quite 1m apart, with each plant usually producing two ears (with right variety -- some only produce one ear).

I emphasize that I HAND POLLINATE to ensure good pollination, but I described my experiments in detail and posted photos for the last three years at least.

I'm getting better at it but harvest is mostly for fun and special treat.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Here is photos from above to that selected area as a plan, later i will ask about few trees next to the wall so i can remove it if unwanted so i can get little more space.

I went to measure that selected area from the wall to the middle of the front entrance of metal fence, and it is 7m, and then from the front entrance to inside just right before the limit of where my pomegranate tree is and it gives me another 7m.

Let's say i will take gaps or cut from all directions, and i just have 6.5m or even 6m square, 6m is ~20ft, do you think that 20x20ft area isn't enough for anything worthy?

I did read from another site that i need about 4'x4' block for sweet corn for pollination, 4x4' is a small portion of 20x20', and i even asked them if i can take say 20'x 6' area for only sweet corn and leave the rest for another plants including tomatoes, isn't it enough space for sweet corn and anything else? So if you have that 6mx6m [20x20ft] square area part of your garden, and you have list of some plants, what you will choose to plant and how you plant on that specific area?

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Re: Sweet corn planting

Well, in that case you could do some creative planting including corn AS LONG AS THE AREA FOR THE CORN GETS FULL DAY SUN (8 hrs or more I think)

Here's one example of a portion of my garden from this past summer (and link to the thread)

Subject: Applestar's 2015 Garden
applestar wrote:Finally, FINALLY, finished planting the Sunflower House and Extension :-()
Sowed Pre-germinated melon seeds (didn't wait for them to sprout their seed leaves) and planted SIL's melon seedlings started from store or farmers market bought melon in the "melon" section, and sowed pre-germinated Narcissus F1 gourd which is supposed to be edible like summer squash when picked young. Armenian cucumbers which is actually a melon also went in the melon section.

Image

...all that's left to do is to take down the winter compost pile and use it to mulch and hill the potatoes and corn in the Haybale Row. I may sow some more bush wax beans in the still available/reserved spots where the squash and watermelons will be filling in as they grow.
You'll see that you could plant in "succession" so when one crop is finished, another can take over the same space. Best way to do this is by keeping the best growing temperature and timing in mind.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Here's another thread from 2014 --
Subject: 2014 Spiral Garden Garlic Onion Pea Corn Squash Cuke Beet
applestar wrote:It's getting harder to walk the spiral -- I have to push the corn leaves aside and bend my head a bit. The squash and melon vines are growing wild and I have to re-adjust their direction every day. Snowpeas need to be picked daily, and the shell peas are starting to make pods - hopefully! this semi-sun location with plenty of water from the outer spiral path/swale will keep them going through the heat.
Image
image.jpg
Planted seven hot peppers -- mostly overwintered plants, but one from this year' started seeds -- along the front outer spiral between the onions and garlic.

The squash are really liking the Haybale row:
image.jpg
But the plants on the end NOT in the tunnel are blooming earlier -- more light?
image.jpg
image.jpg
...are these helpful at all?

If you read through them, you may have noticed that I don't intentionally plant tomatoes where I plant corn -- that's because it's generally considered best to keep them separated. There is a moth caterpillar here that will attack both tomato fruits and corn ears -- "tomato fruit worm" and "corn ear worm" -- and when they are planted right next to each other, the moth will find a larger contiguous crop to lay eggs on and, moreover, the caterpillar could actually crawl from one to the other and have tomatoes for breakfast and corn for dinner. :evil:

I usually (try to) post about my tomato gardens in a separate thread. :wink:
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Re: Sweet corn planting

I would plant two rows spaced 762 mm and space the seeds 150 mm in the rows. You can expand from there, but these are the recommended spacings. Plant the seed directly where it will grow. No transplanting.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

A 20x20 garden is a good size space. You can plant corn in the sunniest spots but as Apple said it is better not to plant tomatoes next to them. Besides the shared pests, they also are both nutrient hungry.

Corn needs to be planted in a block, a 4x4 block is usually minimum but you can expand on that. I would plant beans as a companion as they do not need as much nitrogen as the corn. You can plant a melon or squash and make it a three sisters garden. Plant the tallest things in the sunniest spot but you want to make sure that short plants are not shaded by them.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Image

Pic of one of my past gardens. As you see tomatoes next to the corn. It has not been a problem here. I may not get some of the pests others have mentioned because of my very cold winters?
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Possibly, jal_ut. I don't get tomato fruit worms / corn ear worms on regular basis either. My garden seem to fall under attack by those and other, more heat loving -- and not winter hardy -- pests (leaf foots, squash bugs, blister beetles, harlequin bugs, pickleworms, locusts/grasshoppers... Etc.) after remnants of tropical storms and hurricanes sweep up the coast or up from the gulf and up the central states then cut up and across the Appalachians, so I think they are brought here by the weather systems.

If we have a mild winter like we have had a few years ago, we have more of those pests in the following season.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Ok, then in this case, i should plant tomatoes next to the wall and the corn just next to the front entrance to the garden, and i can plant something in between them, the sun direction from what i see is just parallel to that of the entrance, so it can light both directions when it is in the top middle of the garden, then way all plants will get light, it is just in the early morning or end of the day near the sunset where the sun will light up next the entrance first and that next to the wall will be under shadow, and end of the day by sunset those next to the wall will be the last to see the light, so the corn will get the light first and the tomatoes will have the light last so they can have enough light everyday.

Now the question is, what i will plant in between the tomatoes and the corn? mostly those small plants or say ground-spread type plants such as watermelon, in fact if i plant tomatoes and corn first then i am done and i can think later about anything else, i may use another part of the garden for only watermelon if necessary and keep that area i chose for corps and very important plants for me, watermelon and lettuce aren't in my top list, they are in bottom actually.

jal_ut, i like the idea of planting the seed directly to the ground rather than transplanting, but as long i keep preparing my garden and cleaning it i will waste time and i may miss days or weeks of waiting while if i planted in pots or containers they will be grown enough so can transplant then i don't wait them to be sprouting, but if transplanting may kill the plant or slowing the growth very much then it will be like not a safe side then, also i am not sure what i will plant completely i my garden, so i start with many plants out of garden and then choose carefully the most what i need, and to test the environment o each plant in pots/containers so i know what to avoid and what to choose, wish if the garden was ready totally now then i will definitely plant the seeds in the ground.

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Re: Sweet corn planting

Plant your corn seed in the ground where it will grow. Do not transplant it. Two or three rows spaced 30 inches works much better than a single row.

Image

Image
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TareqPhoto
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Re: Sweet corn planting

jal_ut wrote:Plant your corn seed in the ground where it will grow. Do not transplant it. Two or three rows spaced 30 inches works much better than a single row.

Image

Image
Well, i was thinking that as long i have enough space then i can take 2 or 3 rows for sweet corns, but i decided to give it only 2 rows with long line for one row and the second is just the copy, so i will have 2 rows long, this will give maybe more chances for pollination than smaller block, i wanted to give another space for tomatoes too, and there will be space for both plants in one selected area, so i better plant my seeds directly in the ground than transplanting, ok, i will give this a go once i am done with my garden selected area cleaning/preparation.

Nice corn you posted, but i didn't like this yellow/white type, i like if i can get the full yellow corn for each stick.

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Re: Sweet corn planting

If you are going to plant corn it is better to have 4 rows and a block instead of a long row. Take your two long rows and make a block of 4 rows. Corn yields poorly only 1 or two ears per plant. The corn ears on the outside of the row will yield the least the corn on the inside of the block will yield the most.

Mulch holds down weeds. You can use straw as mulch. You would buy it as a bale from a farm supply. Make sure it is straw not hay. You will spread it over the finished bed 4 inches thick. When you plant, you will expose the row by moving the mulch to the side and plant the seeds in the ground. Do not cover the seeds with the mulch.

You can divide the bed in sections so you can work on one part at a time while another is planted. You need to have space for pathways anyway if you are planting many different things.

You can divide the bed into at least 4 quadrants and work one at a time. Plant the corn in one quadrant 4x4 rows.
15 c. is probably night temperatures. Day temperatures are warmer and no where near freezing. It is a good time to plant greens lettuce, cabbage, spinach, beets, carrots, radish.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Yes, there are many varieties of corn. I don't know what will be available there.
Golden Cross Bantam, Miracle, Growers Choice, NK 199 and Bodacious
are some examples of yellow corn.

The corn in the pictures is Ambrosia. Yes, it is bi-color.
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Re: Sweet corn planting

I have grown Bodacious that Jal-ut mentioned for the last few years and have loved it. It has a creamy texture that can't be described. This year though, for the first time, I did get some corn earworms in Bodacious for who knows what reason. But, the damage was minimal; the little caterpillars were only in the very tips of the ears. I would recommend Bodacious as a solid yellow corn.
bodacious.JPG
bodacious.JPG (39.38 KiB) Viewed 1816 times
This upcoming year, I will be gardening in 2 separate locations, so I want to grow some of Jal-ut's Ambrosia at one spot and Bodacious in the other. I think they both have about the same maturation time. I've already got some Ambrosia seed. :wink: Can't wait!

TareqPhoto
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Location: Ajman - United Arab Emirates

Re: Sweet corn planting

I planted new seeds nearly 1 week ago after the first time failure, and this time i planted only 1 seed in each hole instead of two, and wow, the germinated also and will grow, i am not sure how long those new seeds/plants will grow/live, but it is good to know that the seeds are in good condition as long they germinated second time, i will update you with those new plants so if anything wrong going on you can tell me what so i can avoid it when i will plant the seeds in the ground instead of containers so they can have a permanent place without disturbance of transplanting.
Attachments
Container 1
Container 1
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Container 2
Container 2

ButterflyLady29
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Corn seed should be spaced about 1/2 meter apart. Most corn needs a lot of room to grow and you'll need at least 50 plants to get proper pollination. So a block of corn would be at least 25 meters long and 40 meters wide. You'll have to have the corn plants separated by rows so you have room to walk through and check the plants and pick the corn. It would look a little like this [ ] [ ] [ ]. I forgot to add that you can plant 2 rows close together, then have a walkway or path, then 2 rows then walkway, and so on. Some people plant clover, usually white dutch clover in their corn patch to keep the other weeds from growing and to protect the soil. I've never tried that because I can't grow sweet corn. To many animals would eat it before I get any.

Mulch, any organic material spread on the soil to help save moisture in the soil and keep weed seeds from growing. Here in the US we have a lot of different kinds of mulch. Some people use cardboard sheets or newspaper. Others use grass clippings that are gathered when mowing the lawn. And some use shredded dried leaves that fall from the trees in autumn. Another mulch is wood chips or bark chips, known as bagged mulch. The wood or bark chips can be bought at stores and gas stations here. If paper or cardboard is used you have to put something on top of it to keep it from blowing away.

You can plant a lot of things outdoors now. Turnips, broccoli, carrots, beets, cabbage, lettuce, kale, peas, and radishes can be planted in cool weather.

I did a little checking on your temperature because my ability to convert celsius to fahrenheit is terrible. So your temperature is 59F to 82F. Here we call that summer. Do you ever drop below 0c? If your temperature won't get below 10c then you can plant squash, tomatoes, peppers, corn, sunflowers, and other warm weather crops outside. If it normally goes below 10c then the cool weather crops can be planted.

TareqPhoto
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Re: Sweet corn planting

ButterflyLady29 wrote:Corn seed should be spaced about 1/2 meter apart. Most corn needs a lot of room to grow and you'll need at least 50 plants to get proper pollination. So a block of corn would be at least 25 meters long and 40 meters wide. You'll have to have the corn plants separated by rows so you have room to walk through and check the plants and pick the corn. It would look a little like this [ ] [ ] [ ]. I forgot to add that you can plant 2 rows close together, then have a walkway or path, then 2 rows then walkway, and so on. Some people plant clover, usually white dutch clover in their corn patch to keep the other weeds from growing and to protect the soil. I've never tried that because I can't grow sweet corn. To many animals would eat it before I get any.

Mulch, any organic material spread on the soil to help save moisture in the soil and keep weed seeds from growing. Here in the US we have a lot of different kinds of mulch. Some people use cardboard sheets or newspaper. Others use grass clippings that are gathered when mowing the lawn. And some use shredded dried leaves that fall from the trees in autumn. Another mulch is wood chips or bark chips, known as bagged mulch. The wood or bark chips can be bought at stores and gas stations here. If paper or cardboard is used you have to put something on top of it to keep it from blowing away.

You can plant a lot of things outdoors now. Turnips, broccoli, carrots, beets, cabbage, lettuce, kale, peas, and radishes can be planted in cool weather.

I did a little checking on your temperature because my ability to convert celsius to fahrenheit is terrible. So your temperature is 59F to 82F. Here we call that summer. Do you ever drop below 0c? If your temperature won't get below 10c then you can plant squash, tomatoes, peppers, corn, sunflowers, and other warm weather crops outside. If it normally goes below 10c then the cool weather crops can be planted.
Your post showing me that i should forget planting/growing corn because it sounds i need half of my whole garden area to be planted with corn for the best result, and actually i chose only quarter from that half of my garden anyway, i can't just use it only for corn, if that is the case then simply i have to ignore corn and plant another things i really need more than corn, i selected an area which is about 6x6m or nearly 20x20 feet after i took about 1m[3feet] from all direction to give a space to all around of that area, so if that 6x6m isn't that much enough for corn then i can't plant tomatoes or lettuce or whatever, i was thinking i may use half of that 6x6 say 3x6 for corn and 1x6 for tomatoes, 2 meter between the tomatoes and corn corps, the tomatoes i was planning to give one row, which is say along that 6 meter long but 1 meter wide, the corn i was giving it also long 6meter but in 3 rows next to each other so it can give kind of block, or 2 rows isn't enough? i mean pollination can't be done by hand so i don't depend on wind or flies to do it for me?

Also, are all corn varieties need the same block area to be grown or some can be grown in smaller blocks? I did read that i need minimum 4x4' block area for corn, if i understand it correctly this is 4feet by 4feet, right? if so then it translates or converted to about 1.2meter by 1.2meter, what if i said i will take quarter of that area 6x6m so it is 3meter by 3meter, this is about 10x10', that is even more than a double of 4x4', that isn't enough too yet? if not then simply i have to forget about corn and just plant something else including tomatoes.

Taiji
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Butterfly Lady, did you mean to say 25 meters by 40 meters? I have been growing a small block of corn about 6 feet by 8 feet in recent years with good success. 25 meters by 40 is about 80 some feet by 130 feet.

TareqPhoto
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Taiji wrote:Butterfly Lady, did you mean to say 25 meters by 40 meters? I have been growing a small block of corn about 6 feet by 8 feet in recent years with good success. 25 meters by 40 is about 80 some feet by 130 feet.
Exactly my point, honestly even my garden isn't that big if it is 25 meters by 40 meters, it is like i plant the entire garden, and even with 25 feet by 40 feet it is still so big taking nearly the whole side yard garden, i chose an area that is almost 23 feet by 23 feet, and i am taking 2-3 feet from all edges to keep it to 20x20 feet square area.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Sweet corn planting

25 x 40 m doesn't make sense to me either . I have grown corn in a 4th block (1.2 m sq) and I have seen it grown in large containers.
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TareqPhoto
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Re: Sweet corn planting

rainbowgardener wrote:25 x 40 m doesn't make sense to me either . I have grown corn in a 4th block (1.2 m sq) and I have seen it grown in large containers.
Ok, so one member suggesting to have a very large area and others just saying it doesn't make a sense, who i should believe? and what i should do here then?

HoneyBerry
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Yes, I agree with these responses. Corn needs warmth and lots of sun. I always plant corn directly in the ground, not in pots. The organic farm where I did some volunteer work states that corn is easy to grow and will grow anywhere. I don't think that is necessarily true. One thing I know about corn is that how it is watered makes a difference as to how it turns out. It needs to receive adequate water while the corn kernels are forming. Those cobs of corn that you sometimes see that have uneven rows of kernels? That is the result of uneven watering.
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TareqPhoto
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Location: Ajman - United Arab Emirates

Re: Sweet corn planting

BirdLover wrote:Yes, I agree with these responses. Corn needs warmth and lots of sun. I always plant corn directly in the ground, not in pots. The organic farm where I did some volunteer work states that corn is easy to grow and will grow anywhere. I don't think that is necessarily true. One thing I know about corn is that how it is watered makes a difference as to how it turns out. It needs to receive adequate water while the corn kernels are forming. Those cobs of corn that you sometimes see that have uneven rows of kernels? That is the result of uneven watering.
So watering is the key, with good ground and plenty of sun it will go up strong and healthy, well, we have that plenty of sun, and i am still working out to prepare hat ground, all what is left is the watering, i really not sure how good quality our water is or what is the volume of water is needed for my plants including the corn.

HoneyBerry
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Water is important, but other things are just as important. Seed selection, soil quality, soil temperature, timing, planting method, sun exposure. Whenever I plant something new, something that I've never grown before, I have found that doing some research before planting really helps. Even with practice, I still make mistskes, but I make less mistakes if I do some research first. Which is what you are doing. There are good people here to help.
One thing I learned along the way is that corn that is planted in small gardens does best if planted in blocks rather than rows. Planting in blocks helps the pollination process. Adequate moisture is important but do is well drained soil. A layer of mulch helps retain the moisture.
ISFP "The Artist"

ButterflyLady29
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Sorry, my metric conversion messed me up. I'll try to rework it using feet. A plot that is 4 feet wide can be planted in a double row, seeds spaced closer to the middle than the edges. It could be done in 2 plots, as long as you want to make them. I did popcorn in 2, 3 feet wide and 20 foot long plots one year. So that would be 10 feet by 20 feet, including the path through the middle. I didn't hand pollinate them and still had good production.
Now I'm confused about how I got 25 x 40 meters.
Ideal seed spacing is stated as being 18 inches (1/2 meter) apart, but it can be planted a bit closer together.

TareqPhoto
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Re: Sweet corn planting

Sounds the soil is really good enough, the seeds i planted again as second test germinated and growing, and wow, it is really growing fast, so i can't wait to plant the seeds in the permanent beds then watch it grow day after day, I feel these days are the best time for planting because we have warmth in the morning or noon until sunset then normal to cold, very hot and high humid may kill the plants or seeds or make it very very slow to grow, i know the plant need heat, but our heat is irresistible even for us human so i feel nowadays warmth is enough at least for germinating and sprouting.

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