imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11684
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

nematodes in the garden

I finally got around to starting to prep half my garden for the fall season. I had a sickly looking cutting celery that I dug out and it turned out to have galls all over the roots. Nematodes are not new in the garden. It is why I use potting soil and plant most of my tomatoes and ginger in pots.

I was surprised that it was in this particular part of the garden rather than the other where I have had it before. It may just be because of what I planted.

I have sunhemp and crackerjack seeds I can plant for nematode suppression.

I looked up what other things I can plant instead besides the usual nematode resistant ones.

I was surprised to find that some of the mustard cabbages will suppress nematodes. I think I want to try that. It is still a little too hot for planting mustard cabbage, but, I'll see what happens. It is a 40-50 day crop, and at least it is something I can eat. Besides considering how long it took me to get around to digging up the garden and I still have the other half (it is worse than this one was) to go, it might be just about right by then.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28242
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 7:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: nematodes in the garden

Have you had the chance to read this?

ATTRA -- Nematodes: Alternative Controls
Covercrops and a Crop Rotation
https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/viewht ... 149#cropro
Botanical Control
https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/viewht ... id=149#bot
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11684
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: nematodes in the garden

Thanks for the link Apple. I did not see that publication before but I have seen similar ones. Nematodes are a common problem here. When I had it before it was so bad that I dug out the soil and did a soil replacement.

Ginger is not nematode resistant that is why I always grow it in a large pot with fresh potting soil every year. Local ginger farms pretty much move the farm if they start getting nematodes. The other thing they do besides strict sanitary procedures is to rotate ginger with marigolds. Every other row on the farm are marigolds. When the ginger is harvested the beds are switched.

Most of the tomatoes I grow are nematode resistant anyway, but since I do like to grow some new ones and try some heirlooms, I grow the new tomatoes the same way. The tomatoes I know are nematode resistant go in the ground.

Poamoho and contender are nematode resistant beans and I have not had problems with Oregan sugar pod peas so I am thinking it probably is resistant too. Where I have had nematodes, I have confined the known areas by making sure I work those areas last and wash the tools and my shoes in pinesol disinfectant before I go anywhere else with them. I have planted the known nematode areas with crackerjack and nemagone marigolds and sunhemp. I try to avoid planting anything that is not nematode resistant in any of those areas so I actually have been practicing a rotation of sorts.

I did try solarizing, but it was not nearly as effective as the marigolds. I also have sesame that more or less grows wild.
I have found when I do have nematodes and use only resistant cultivars, the nematode counts do drop. I just have to move my non- resistant plants to clean areas of the garden or to large pots instead. After a couple of years I can usually plant the non-resistant plants in that spot again at least for a short time.

Cover crops like sun hemp and marigolds work, but the weeds cannot be allowed to grow.

The downside of sun hemp is that it is a big plant with deep roots, it is not that easy to dig out. It works great if the goal is to break up hard soil though. It is only used for animal fodder.

I always have crackerjack growing in the herb garden where there are at least 4 known spots that have nematodes. It is easy to grow, gives the herb garden a lot of color and it is prolific, so I have collected enough seed from them to last years.

https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-32.pdf
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-35.pdf
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11684
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: nematodes in the garden

Well, I lost the last cucumber seedling to the invisible slug. I hope it was happy. I put slug bait in that container too.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11684
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: nematodes in the garden

I soaked my shoes and tools in pine sol overnight, I hope it is enough to disinfect them.

I was going to plant lettuce and beets but now I will probably put in mustard cabbage and crackerjack marigolds instead.

I think I bought that cutting celery plant as a start. So far the other plants I dug up did not show any nematodes.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28242
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 7:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: nematodes in the garden

I hope these measures work for you. Good luck!
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.



Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”