koonaone
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Location: Lillooet - HighBar - Cariboo, BC - Bioregions of Corrdilera

Edaphology of Squash plants

Hi folks

I'm accustomed to fertilising Zuchinni's quite heavily. This year I'm growing Spaghetti and Crookneck Squashes as well, for the first time. Should I fertilise them heavily as well?
I have perhaps 10 gallons of coffee grounds saved up. Where would be a good place to put them? I sheet compost or dig additions in, rather than do the compost pile routine.

Thanking you very much.

douglas

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applestar
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Re: Edaphology of Squash plants

"Edaphology" is a new word for me. Thanks!

Interesting question ... UCG quickly molds left in a clump and left on surface, mats and becomes hydrophobic, but its really attractive to the earthworms when scratched into the soil. I'm thinking a ring of trench just beyond the root zone and shallowly rake the UCG in, then mulch. After that, the earthworms will be perpetuating the feeding with EWCs (earthworm casings)

What do you think?

...oh... Just noticed you are in BC -- do you have earthworms there or are you north of the glacier line?
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

koonaone
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Location: Lillooet - HighBar - Cariboo, BC - Bioregions of Corrdilera

Re: Edaphology of Squash plants

Yes, well north of the glacier line, however in a pronounced topographic rainshadow effected area which resulted in an early retreat of glaciation. So, having cleared that up i've got no idea if the Worms here are indigenous or introduced. They have made themselves right at home in any case.

applestar wrote >> I'm thinking a ring of trench just beyond the root zone

Weaver and Bruner in writing of Hubbard Squash state, in: https://www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrar ... 37toc.html

" A radial spread of 13 to 19 feet is attained. Five to seven main roots, with numerous branches 2 to 8 feet long and all again rebranched, form the groundwork which supports a remarkably branched root network that completely ramifies the surface foot of soil. Nodal roots, already 4 to 5 feet long and also superficial but extremely well rebranched, increase the absorbing area. Thus nearly 1,000 cubic feet of soil give of its supplies of water and nutrients to the support of a single plant. "

Makes us wonder where to put that ring trench doesn't it.

Thanks for your reply applestar.

douglas

imafan26
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Re: Edaphology of Squash plants

I guess that answers the question why my zucchini grows nice, flowers, but doesn't produce that much fruit. I guess I should feed it more. I thought it was because I only had one zucchini plant and the male and female flowers just didn't seem to be opening in sync with each other.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Edaphology of Squash plants

Well, that's the ultimate length of the roots -- nice ref btw, I like to read that once in a while to remind myself how amazing these plants are -- so I would base it on the current size of the plant and put the nutrient source just beyond to make them reach for it :twisted: Gently scratching down the soil could help you find the roots too -- GENTLY though.

Imafan, that could also be true, though.
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

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jal_ut
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Re: Edaphology of Squash plants

you have good info on the squash roots. I will respond to this: "I guess that answers the question why my zucchini grows nice, flowers, but doesn't produce that much fruit. I guess I should feed it more. I thought it was because I only had one zucchini plant and the male and female flowers just didn't seem to be opening in sync with each other."

When planting zucchini or crookneck, plant a hill of 5 seeds. Then you get 5 plants that will grow out like the spokes on a wheel and give you a nice clump of squash. Be advised it takes a bee to pollinate the blossoms. If you don't have bees around, you can hand pollinate with a q tip. The pollen does have to be moved from the male flower to the female flower by some carrier. The wind won't do it.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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