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Millstone Farm
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Moringa Oleifera

Has anyone ever planted it? eaten it?
Any pros and cons?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Hi and welcome to the Forum!

If you type Moringa into the Google custom search box above (which only searches this site), you will find 25 hits about moringa and people's experience with it.
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Millstone Farm
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Thanks!

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ion
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

We grow and eat it. It can be grown from seed or cuttings. It's a pretty hardy plant that can tolerate a bit of drought. We have one fairly large tree that's growing fine in hard clay soil.

Most parts of the plant is supposedly edible, but we use just the leaves and seed pods.
The leaves have a mild tasting perhaps with a "green" flavor. It's usually added to a lot of soup or stew dishes, but you can use it to supplement many dishes like omelettes or noodle soup for example.
The pods can be harvested anytime when they are young and tender upto mature with a harder green skin. If left to mature the skin become fibrous and woody but the seeds and insides are still soft. When they turn brown, the pods are pretty much only good for seeds (edible).

Below are example of how we use moringa (we call marunggay/malunggay)
One simple dish is Chicken Papaya - https://hawaiifoods.hawaii.edu/recipes.a ... 0002&sid=0
Here's another, it involves winter squash and shrimps:
https://www.fudgin-it.com/2013/05/nutrit ... -kalabasa/
Here a variation of that, using the pods and eggplants:
https://www.foodrecap.net/wp-content/upl ... ay-pod.jpg

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Millstone Farm
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Thanks ion!
Can't wait to plant mine!

imafan26
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Howzit ion

Ion gave you the best advice on how to use and eat it.

It is also called drumstick tree . It does have a smell. Ion called it green.

It is a very big tree. I have never seen it in its natural form because the Filipinos here who grow it in their yards are always hacking off the branches for the leaves. It is widely grown in the tropics and a mainstay of many traditional diets. It does have some health benefits too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krl5mf_qF3M
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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Millstone Farm
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Big tree...guess I might better not plant them in my greenhouse.
Can't wait to try it.

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ion
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Sup imafan.

Millstone, it's size depends on how it is grown and pruned/unpruned. The tree I was talking about is probably around ~15ft tall but it's lanky rather than bushy. We don't chop the branches/stems off from this tree very often.
We had few small trees from a cutting, their main trunk were under a foot in height above soil level. The branches it produced were chopped and harvested when they reach 3-5ft in height.

In the video Imafan posted, some of the trees were only about 2-3meters tall (@ 11:00), about a foot or two taller than the women standing next to it. The beds (@11:20) were from seeds and have been chopped/topped back below 3ft.

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Millstone Farm
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Thanks ion!

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applestar
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Moringa has been getting a lot of attention lately... Or, I'm just seeing more reference. This is making me want to try growing it... (Did I mention SO easily -um- INSPIRED! Yeah that's the word :wink:) Hmmm.... 8)
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Joyfirst
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

I would love to try too. It seems like they grow very fast and well from seeds. And we can cut them down to 7 inches, and then have two trees -put top into the dirt to root, and stump will start growing branches. Then prune them again.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaR31js ... 3t_TlaP1vA

imafan26
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

We grew ours from a 6 ft cutting that we just stuck in the ground. Mind you I live in Hawaii and it is a tropical tree. Mine was never short. It put out 6-8 ft branches and I did have to cut it often.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

Joyfirst
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

I have now a few growing in pots, but some insects do attack them, even though they are not native. I even caught bagrada bug sitting on it -I hope it was just sitting... I hope they will make it. I should transfer the to larger pots.

Joyfirst
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Re: Moringa Oleifera

Millstone Farm wrote:Big tree...guess I might better not plant them in my greenhouse.
Can't wait to try it.
Did you try growing moringa and how did it go? It doesn't have to be big, if you keep pruning once a week or two weeks. How much I understand, you don't even need tools to do that -branches snap right off. And then you can collect leaves to eat them.

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