weterman
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Questions about the poison in potatoes

So fruits that grow on potatoes have the poison in them. I ate a few once, and I felt odd. (not doing that again) so I'm just wondering, how poisonus are the stems and leaves of the potato plant? are they more poisonus than the fruit? or less?

From personal experience, I found that the poison in these potatoes make your throat sore. If you have about 3 fruits at once, your brain will feel "off" in about 12 - 24 hours. So if you have only one, that won't happen to your brain.

After some testing, I found out that the green potatoes, are not very poisonus at all, compared to the fruit. I tried eating one, I left a quarter of it un eaten, cause the taste was so bad. But my throat wasn't even sore after eating all that, and my brain wasn't even close to feeling "off".

So, I'm just curious to how poisonus the leaves and stems of the plant are.


Also, did anyone else have 3 fruits at a time? or any? how was it? did you feel anything different with your brain?


(im really sorry if this topic seems like a troll topic, it is not meant to be. im just curious to see how the poison is, in different parts of the plant.


and another question- do green tomatoes have solanine in them?

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Green tomatoes do have solanine in them, about 50 mg/ 100 gm of fruit. When the tomatoes are fully ripe, it is down to .5 mg / 100 gm of fruit. By comparison potato tubers have some where between 8 and 20 mg / 100 gm solanine. But I couldn't find info on the concentration of solanine in the potato fruit. Clearly it is a lot more than either the potato tuber or tomato fruit, since eating tomatoes produces no ill effects.

Effects of solanine toxicity are described as various kinds of GI distress, burning throat, dizziness, headaches, brain rhythm abnormalities.

I don't know the answer to any of your other questions and would not try eating the potato fruit.
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weterman
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

rainbowgardener wrote:Green tomatoes do have solanine in them, about 50 mg/ 100 gm of fruit. When the tomatoes are fully ripe, it is down to .5 mg / 100 gm of fruit. By comparison potato tubers have some where between 8 and 20 mg / 100 gm solanine. But I couldn't find info on the concentration of solanine in the potato fruit. Clearly it is a lot more than either the potato tuber or tomato fruit, since eating tomatoes produces no ill effects.

Effects of solanine toxicity are described as various kinds of GI distress, burning throat, dizziness, headaches, brain rhythm abnormalities.

I don't know the answer to any of your other questions and would not try eating the potato fruit.
ya what happened after i ate some of those is i felt stupid and confused about everything.

nothing made sense really, and my short term memory was really bad. like, you know after you wake up from a dream, you can barely remember the dream? well i felt like that about something that happened literally 5 seconds ago. It was actually a nice feeling, i felt real relaxed. it also took away a constant headache i have, like it feels like there's always some pressure in my head, it just took that pressure away. When and if my potato grows i will see what happens if i take a tiny piece piece of a leaf off and eat it.

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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Solanine is a toxic alkaloid. Most alkaloids are toxic at least a little. When you are young and healthy, the body can filter these out through the liver and kidneys. But as you get older, the body can no longer filter these out. Compounds that the body cannot filter out are one of the major causes of inflamation. Potato, tomato, peppers, and eggplant are all from the nightshade family and best avoided by the elderly.

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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

I just want to respectfully point out that what you are saying is opinion but is not a scientific fact. Everyone's entitled to their opinion but it's important to label a statement as opinion so that it is not confused with a scientific fact.

It's scientifically recommended that the elderly should eat potatoes and tomatoes. It is recommended. The fact is that the harmful quantities of compounds in potatoes are not present unless the flesh is green. And even then an adult would have to eat a significant amount of it to cause a health problem. Potatoes are safe to eat and absolutely 100% recommended. Same with Tomatoes. In fact, tomatoes are very healthy and even the skins of a potato and tomato are rich with nutrients.

Citations
NIHSeniorHealth.gov

USDA.gov

About Green Potatoes:
When potatoes are exposed to light, metabolic activity in the skin increases as it prepares to send out shoots. As a result, chlorophyll is formed, which provides the green color. Another product formed is solanine, which is a glycoalkaloid toxin. It has a bitter taste and can irritate the gastrointestinal tract. If enough is eaten it could cause symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. Because of the bitter taste, it is rare for someone to eat enough to actually get sick.

Small green spots can be trimmed off. If more extensive greening occurs, throw the potato out.

The tendency for potatoes to turn green and form solanine varies among varieties. To prevent it from happening, inspect potatoes at the store before purchasing and store them at home in a cool dark place with good air circulation.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Those are pretty general articles, but there is this. I looked and the only connection I could find with nightshades and the elderly is the theory that maybe they exacerbate symptoms of arthritis, but:

Top 5 Arthritis Myths:

Another common myth is that nightshade vegetables, which include potatoes, eggplant, peppers and tomatoes, can exacerbate arthritis symptoms. The belief is that a chemical in these vegetables can cause too much calcium to build up in the body, damaging the joints.

But doctors say there's not a lot of scientific evidence to back up that claim.

"It's hard to study this relationship, but even though we don't know for sure, it doesn't look like clear evidence that these foods can make symptoms worse," said Dr. Joanne Jordan, director of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine's Thurston Arthritis Research Center in Chapel Hill.

Recent studies, however, found that nightshade vegetables may actually help keep symptoms in check. According to the Arthritis Foundation's publication, Arthritis Today, a study found that yellow and purple potatoes may reduce inflammation in men. Another study found that people who consumed high amounts of lutein, a compound in tomatoes, were 70 percent less likely to have osteoarthritis.

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/top-arthri ... 15510663#2
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Artemisia is also the person who was pushing the theory that we should avoid foods high in oxalates:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/vi ... 20&start=0

High oxalate foods include most of the most nutritious, highest in anti-oxidants, foods in the world like beets, chard, spinach, sweet potatoes, figs, wheat bran, blueberries, soy protein/ tofu, almonds, lentils, peanuts, sesame seed/ tahini, blackberries, etc etc.

Free radicals contribute to chronic diseases from cancer to heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease to vision loss. Anti-oxidants remove free radicals from the body and thus help prevent all of that. So while you are busy avoiding possible inflammation from unproven theories relating to solanine and oxalate, you are increasing your risk of many of the most common and most serious diseases in the elderly.
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

weterman wrote: ya what happened after i ate some of those is i felt stupid and confused about everything.

nothing made sense really, and my short term memory was really bad. like, you know after you wake up from a dream, you can barely remember the dream? well i felt like that about something that happened literally 5 seconds ago. It was actually a nice feeling, i felt real relaxed. it also took away a constant headache i have, like it feels like there's always some pressure in my head, it just took that pressure away. When and if my potato grows i will see what happens if i take a tiny piece piece of a leaf off and eat it.
That is because solanine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibtor. Acetylcholine has powerful effects in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, including the antiexcitatory effect that you experience as relaxation. In high enough doses, it will depolarize the nerves that control heartbeat and respiration. Concentrations of solanine may be particularly high in new growth, including sprouts and young leaves.

If you want to get relaxed and clumsy, use something safe like pot.

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Nice post, bill, good information.

I'm going to just get a little nerdy and spell it out a bit more for those who aren't familiar with the terms:

"That is because solanine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibtor. Acetylcholine has powerful effects in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Acetylcholinesterase is the enzyme that breaks down and neutralizes the acetylcholine, so that it is no longer active in the nervous system. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor blocks the action of the enzyme, so that the acetylcholine continues to be active and producing effects in the nervous system, including the antiexcitatory effect that you experience as relaxation."

[red part added]
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

What it boils down to is: DO NOT EAT THE FRUIT! NOR the FOLIAGE!

A little green on the tubers is not so bad if you peel it kinda deep and get most of the green off. Most of the toxin is close to the skin. Deep frying or boiling reduces the toxin in the potato because some of the toxin will migrate into the cooking medium.

Symptoms of too much solannine are mainly vomiting and nausea, usually delayed 12 or so hours after ingestion.
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weterman
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

Artemesia wrote:Solanine is a toxic alkaloid. Most alkaloids are toxic at least a little. When you are young and healthy, the body can filter these out through the liver and kidneys. But as you get older, the body can no longer filter these out. Compounds that the body cannot filter out are one of the major causes of inflamation. Potato, tomato, peppers, and eggplant are all from the nightshade family and best avoided by the elderly.
are you saying that if i take solanine when im young, it wont permanently damage my body/brain?

weterman
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Re: Questions about the poison in potatoes

billw wrote:
weterman wrote: ya what happened after i ate some of those is i felt stupid and confused about everything.

nothing made sense really, and my short term memory was really bad. like, you know after you wake up from a dream, you can barely remember the dream? well i felt like that about something that happened literally 5 seconds ago. It was actually a nice feeling, i felt real relaxed. it also took away a constant headache i have, like it feels like there's always some pressure in my head, it just took that pressure away. When and if my potato grows i will see what happens if i take a tiny piece piece of a leaf off and eat it.
That is because solanine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibtor. Acetylcholine has powerful effects in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, including the antiexcitatory effect that you experience as relaxation. In high enough doses, it will depolarize the nerves that control heartbeat and respiration. Concentrations of solanine may be particularly high in new growth, including sprouts and young leaves.

If you want to get relaxed and clumsy, use something safe like pot.


lol i don't really want to grow that it my basement xD

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