Sprout24
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2007 4:41 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Planting tomatoes

I had six tomato plants, the day after I put them in to the ground every single one died :( Is this just because they were not ready? The same thing happened to 5 of the morning glory flowers I planted. I put Zucchini in and they are doing find (with the exception of bugs). What causes plants to die when they go outside?

lillgardnr
Senior Member
Posts: 168
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:12 pm
Location: El Dorado, CA.

I'm no pro, but some of the things that Ive done in the past to kill a plant was by damaging the root during transplanting, over watering, under watering, or just simply putting the plant in a place that didn't suit it... its hard to say what happened to your plants without seeing them, or the area... :? sorry for you loss :cry:

gb
Full Member
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:24 am
Location: Louisiana

Sucks..My dad and his brother told me this before transplanting (may be one of your reasons, especially with tomatoes)
don't transplant during the 8-5/6 o clock because or during strong sunlight in general

Water it a little

don't tamper with roots or soil, just place it in

Leave it alone

I don't if the first one has any truth behind it, but i did try to transplant my sour gourd at 12 o clock and it died

Inamon
Full Member
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed May 16, 2007 12:30 pm
Location: PA, USA

From my reading about plants it is best to repot (transplant plants) during the early morning hours because the roots are very sensitive to sunlight or later in the evening. With tomatoes it is best not to disturb the root ball because again they are sensitive. This year because of reason to difficult to explain we had to transplant during the middle of the day. We used the parasol on the deck to shade from the sun and then watered a little to ensure the soil packed down( only a little). Our little planties did just fine. It is not light exposure per se but direct light exposure that matters. Remember these puppies live under ground their entire lives and are a little like albinos in that respect, a complete inability to deal with sunlight. It probably scaled the roots and if you've then disturbed them, essentially breaking essential connections, the whole plant has withered from lack of ability to absorb water/nutrients because of shock. If they wither and die in the heat and light how are they supposed to work.

Your brother and father have some experience I think?

gb
Full Member
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:24 am
Location: Louisiana

Your brother and father have some experience I think?
If you meant me, then yes my dad and his brother were farmers in India for 40+ years and before my generation all our traceable ancestors were farmers..in India thats considered a very respectable field..

Gardener Don
Cool Member
Posts: 66
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 2:05 pm
Location: Southern Illinois, zone 5b

I have always found it better to put plants in the garden in evening, kinda gives them a chance to settle. If the transplants were grown under light, they will be very vunerable to placing under full sun. In this case, I agree, they will need some artifical shade for a time to allow them to harden. I always set my tomatos as deep as possible without covering their bottom leaves. The plant will send out roots up the entire stem that is in the soil and do well. Always water your transplants in the hole to assist their survival.

gb, farming is a very honorable vocation throughout the world. I grew up on a farm and throughly enjoy getting my hands in dirt - ok ok soil and growing my vegetables and fruits. Good Luck on your "sour gourds" even tho I still do not know what they are. Don

gb
Full Member
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2007 1:24 am
Location: Louisiana

:lol: Sorry, I was saying the wrong thing because in my household we just call them by the indian name which is "kerela"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitter_melon
Sour gourds=bitter gourd
The bumpy kind

sungirl
Full Member
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2007 10:45 pm

I have usually dug 6-8" holes and sprinkled cut up banana peels and egg shells in the ground before covering the tomato plant up to the first leaves and then giving them a thorough watering for a strong rooting. Like others who have replied, I usually planted when its not real hot outside or if it is hot - I've planted them in the morning or later in the afternoon/ evening. If you want them to branch out, then pinch the new tiny leaves growing between the branches and the stem - this allows for all the energy to go to producing fruit rather than to these offshoots, although I have let these offshoots grow then replanted them to also produce fruit the same year. The offshoots are not always that strong nor produce fruit so it may be best to pinch when you think about it. Try starting a few small ones and see what happens. Hope this helps. :)

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