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Gary350
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

SOB wrote:Does anyone have issues with birds eating their fruit? I have talked about putting up some bird nests but they would be located near grapes, raspberries, blueberries, cherries and strawberries. Also some apples, peaches and pears. I would hate to attract them to a house located near this fruit just to have them eat it all and then me want to evict them.
Birds get thirsty just like people fruit and vegetables are a good source of water. I put containers of water 5 feet apart all through the garden. Birds are lazy just like people, if a container of water is closer and easier than a tomatoe the bird will fly to the water to get a drink.

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Gary350
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

LGT wrote:I love watching birds. I have a bird feeder on my back porch and I can watch them from my kitchen sink window. The only problem is I have noticed that they are picking and choosing what they want to eat. They are making a mess all over my back porch. I usually have Mockingbirds, robins, mourning doves, bluejays and cardinals that stop by. Does anyone have suggestions of what I can put in the bird feeder that these birds will especially like? Right now it is just a bag I am buying at Wal-Mart.
Birds like sun flower seeds. Black sun flower seeds are very common and very cheap in large 20 lbs bags about $7 per bag at Farmers Co-op stores. Doves are ground feeders they will not land on a bird feeder.

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applestar
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I only use Black Oil Sunflower seeds, Striped sunflower seeds, Safflower seeds (cardinals), and Black Niger seeds (finches). Mourning doves like grain seeds but they're just as happy pecking around in the lawn. Mockingbirds will eat from a feeder if there re dried berries in them but not often. Robins typically won't eat at the feeder, I think, regardless of what you put in it. They are everywhere in the garden looking for worms.

My feeder visitors are mostly cardinals, chickadees, nuthatches, titmouses, downy and red bellied woodpeckers, bluejays, house finches, goldfinches, as well a the not so welcome house sparrows, grackles, and squirrels. Seasonal visitors include redpolls and pine siskins.

When I have the energy to keep up with changing the nectar, I also put out one or more hummingbird feeder.

Other birds that don't like the feeder so much also visit my garden for insects, berries, etc. Kinglets in early spring and late fall, Juncos in winter, catbirds in the summer, flickers, bluebirds, warblers, etc.
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applestar
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

SOB -- what kind of birdhouses did you put up (hole sizes?)
Unless you've put up a robins nest shelf, I can't think of any birdhouse using birds that would go after your fruits. Maybe bluebirds? But I haven't been able to attract bluebirds here in my suburban garden. They are rare visitors when my mulberry tree is in full fruit.

My main berry and cherry thieves are Catbirds and Robins. Mockingbirds and Cardinals occasionally.
I'm more worried/bothered by squirrels and chipmunks with larger fruits.
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Gary350 wrote:Birds get thirsty just like people fruit and vegetables are a good source of water. I put containers of water 5 feet apart all through the garden. Birds are lazy just like people, if a container of water is closer and easier than a tomatoe the bird will fly to the water to get a drink.
I knew birds would occasionally go after a tomato of mine during a drought but I thought some birds just liked eating fruit for the taste/nutrition - not just to get some water during a dry spell.
Gary350 wrote:Doves are ground feeders they will not land on a bird feeder.
I've had people tell me this before but doves have always come to my bird feeders and land of them. They don't do it too often and they look real awkward and unbalanced but I have seen it many times. That's at two different houses and two different types of feeders. It's real fun to watch them try to stay on the little base of the tall finch/wren feeder.
applestar wrote:SOB -- what kind of birdhouses did you put up (hole sizes?)
Unless you've put up a robins nest shelf, I can't think of any birdhouse using birds that would go after your fruits. Maybe bluebirds? But I haven't been able to attract bluebirds here in my suburban garden. They are rare visitors when my mulberry tree is in full fruit.

My main berry and cherry thieves are Catbirds and Robins. Mockingbirds and Cardinals occasionally.
I'm more worried/bothered by squirrels and chipmunks with larger fruits.
I didnt put up any yet as I didnt want to have to compete for the fruit. I need to do some more research as to the types of houses like my area (more open, not too many trees, but not too many houses and large woods nearby) but I was thinking maybe bluebirds and something else. Do oriels(sp?) come around Ohio?

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I think mourning doves like the millet, milo, and cracked corn which are typical filler seeds in inexpensive wild birdseed mixes.

If you put out sunflower, safflower, and peanuts you'll attract woodpeckers, chickadees, titmouses, and nuthatches that probably live in the woods. They take one seed, fly off to varying degrees of cover to eat, then come back for the next one. But Blue Jays will come and fill up their throat pouches -- I once saw one unable to swallow the last one it was so greedy. :lol: They seem to travel in flocks -- maybe adult pair with fledged babies? -- one time there were SEVEN of them all stuffing themselves silly. I had to refill the feeder after they left. :roll:

They are/are more in the premium birdseed mixes in the birdseed aisles, but like Gary said, are more reasonably priced at the feed store. Black Oil Sunflower Seeds are referred to as "BOSS" and people feed them to horses. I get them in brown paper bags tied with a piece of rope. :D
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Thanks everyone. I will definitely try sunflower seeds and see how that goes. I know what I put out now has some sunflower seeds in it. I rarely see them thrown on the ground either. Something on a similar topic. This morning when I was watering my ferns, I saw a bird had built a nest in one of the ferns. There were no eggs yet. I water the ferns almost everyday. Should I attempt to move the nest or just leave it alone? If left alone I know the baby birds will get soaked almost everyday. I know that the mama bird probably won't come back to the nest if I move it though. Just wondering if the nest will hurt the ferns. I definitely don't want to hurt the fern but I don't want the mama bird to have to start over building her nest.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Well I like birds alot, doves, robins, sparrows, finches, ducks-yes even ducks. For years we have at least one duck nesting near our pond in the front yard....I have several feeders around and scatter wheat here and there...but then there is...the quail :evil: they to like to eat anything growing in my garden. They scratch around in the soft dirt disturbing newly planted seed, take dust baths everywhere, eat seedling of any kind i.e. except onions. As soon as I plant or transplant out comes the floating row cover or bird netting. When the plants get a little larger they usually won't bother them....only lettuce and spinach. All things considered, the enjoyment from watch those furry creatures outweighs the work protecting the crop. :)

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

With the house dangling like that does it spin? Doesn't that freak the wrens out?

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

waterbug, Maybe she is offering the egg as payment for the squash?

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

applestar wrote: I haven't been able to attract bluebirds here in my suburban garden. They are rare visitors when my mulberry tree is in full fruit.
Blue Birds are hard to attract. The bird house has to be built a special way with a certain size hole a certain distance up from the floor of the house. House has to be a certain distance from the ground mounted on a post with brush area to the back of the bird house and a large clearing to the front of the bird house. After birds live in the house 1 year no birds will ever live it again. I always had to build a new bird house ever year to attract more blue birds. Blue birds don't like noise, people, dogs, cats, cars, etc. You pretty much need to avoid the bird house until the birds move in. Once birds move in try not to bother them much or they will leave and abandon the baby birds.

This link is probably one of the best places for information about blue bird houses.
https://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Bluebird-House

I can not remember where to find the rest of the information you need, maybe the Audubon society. Blue bird house should be 6 feet from the ground, on a post, with a hinged roof, facing a large clearing or mowed yard with not trees, with 5 foot tall brush behind the house. From what I have read the perfect place for a Blue bird house would be facing a Golf course with a large field of brush behind the bird house.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I did a project on the Eastern Bluebird back in college. At that time ran across nesting box plans from Lawrence Zeleny. Have had boxes of that design ever since. My experience is at odds with the comment about multiple use. My blue birds have been returning to my yard and re-using the same box for well over 20 years. In a typical summer the birds will raise two or three broods. Some years a single male will tend two or three females which nest in our several boxes that are within a few hundred feet of one another.

I made one major adjustment to the Zeleny design. The old nests must be cleaned out after nesting, so it makes sense to construct the box for easy access to the inside. I solved the problem by placing two screws at the top left and right of the box face and placing a third screw on the bottom of the face. By backing out the bottom screw, the face will then swing up to allow for easy clean out. The front can also be opened to allow for observation of the young developing birds. We have two sets of young so far this spring, a clutch of 5 in one house and three in the other. Black capped chickadees used a third box, but the young have already left the nest.

Here is a link to both the original and the modified nest box from Zeleny. Zeleny was the one who started the blue bird movement back in the 1960's and 1970's.

https://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/nestbox/nabs.htm#Zeleny

In looking at these plans, I see that I've modified the box construction quite a bit, but have kept the dimensions the same. Actually my front panel is inset rather than over lapping the sides. So my works just like the side panel in drawing two from the link.
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I found that birds eat what they know to eat. Some birds are used to being fed bread and they they eat bread, hot dog buns, and pizza but turn away from bird seed.

The doves used to eat the dog food, and if the dog wasn't hungry or in a mood to chase them he'd let them.

I did keep a feeder for awhile. It attracted mostly finches, rice birds, and sparrows. The doves would post themselves as sentries. When I would come out to fill the feeder, they would call the small birds. As the birds fed, they would knock seed to the ground and the doves picked up seed that fell onto the grass. Most of the finches were pets that people released. Budgies don't survive long, but society birds thrive.

I used to be able to grow sunflowers and the birds left it alone. Now, because of the sunflower seeds in the bird mix, the cardinals will come and pick at the sunflower seed heads. My friend who has parrots said that the birds like sunflower seeds, but too much makes the birds more aggressive so they limit it.

Right now the bulbuls are eating my green tomatoes. They don't go after the cherries too much, but they do like to go after the bigger tomatoes.
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I like some birds and feed the Stellar Jays but the starlings at the Nevada spread come in great flocks eating grain, seed and plants while nesting in anything that will stand still, don't like them around.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

These are above my front door (nowhere near my garden), and I have no idea the species, but it's still sorta on-topic, so here you go:

Image

They're quite a bit bluer than they appear in the photo because it's dim under the eaves.

Any guesses as to the species?
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Might be robin eggs.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I feed a lot of black oil sunflower seeds. And this year, i have sudden incursions of sunflower babies cropping up everywhere! lol
not that i mind the volunteer plants in the slightest....
and i do love watching the birds at the feeders.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Yeah, I always have sunflower volunteers from the bird seed, but they aren't aggressive, so I just leave them.

I also have a stand of I think broom corn - looks just like corn except has seed tassels instead of ears. Gets very tall. I believe it came from a birdseed mix also. It comes back every year now and I have to keep digging lots of it out to keep it from taking over the flower bed it is in. But I figure it is probably as good as grass clippings for the compost pile.
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

TheWaterbug wrote:Image
Any guesses as to the species?
Here are Mom and Dad:

Image

If it's any clue, they're both helping out with the feeding. Yes, they've hatched :) Here's an AVI of Dad feeding the babies. I'm assuming it's Dad because of the orange on his head.

edit: National Geographic says House Finch:

Image
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Great shot and good detective work :D

House finches are regulars around here as well and they typically nest in a shrub or tree in my garden, but this couple must have found this nook to their liking. I posted recently about a neighbor who had them nesting in a plastic hanging basket. So they're not very shy. They are backyard feeder birds.
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Thanks for the update. I was wondering how the little guys were doing. I had a nest in a hanging basket on my front porch but I waited and waited for the mama bird to return to lay her eggs. Never did. I am hoping that she found a better nesting spot and didn't die. I have a soft spot for wild birds since when I was little we would take over caring for them if the nests ended up abandoned. Looks like mama and daddy birds are doing an excellent job taking care of babies. I would just keep a far away look out to make sure they keep taking care of them and something doesn't happen to the parents so you have to step in.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Wow! Here's a guy with way better equipment (and skills) than I have. He has some Nat-Geo-quality photos and video of "his" house finches, who made a nest on the wreath on his front door.
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valley
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

If the birds would just eat the squirrels.

Wow, That was an elaborate set up, They got some great event by event flicks.

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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

They're all growed up and gone away! My house finches fledged yesterday morning. There was one last photo/video of 5 kids in the nest, and then in the next shot they were gone. I have empty nest syndrome, in a very literal sense:
WSBC0204.JPG
WSBC0206.JPG
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

While I was looking out of the window, I saw a bright red male cardinal -- always a welcome backyard visitor -- swoop in and land on the arbor trellis. I've seen him around the strawberries (and I don't mind sharing) but I didn't think there were any ripe ones where he was looking, so I grabbed my bird watching binoculars to see what he was up to.

He hopped down to a tomato support stake, then down to the ground and traipsed over to the Red Russian kale growing under the tomato. Staring intently up at the bottom of the leaves, he snatched off a green cabbageworm! :D
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Oh yay!! I always have lots of cardinals around eating the bird seed, but I didn't know they would do that. I will keep them in bird seed forever! :)
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

I saw the cardinal hunting again today. Once at the SFH bed where the corn is growing this year -- he jumped into a patch of clover and garlic chives in the front of the bed and came up with something green and wiggling, then tucking that one in the corner of his beak, he went after something else and, catching the 2nd prey, took off in a hurry. Probably safe to think there are more than one chick in his nest, unless one of them was for his lady love.

2nd time, he was at the SF&H -- Winter Indoor Tomato Trial bed. Funny thing was there was a wren hunting there as well. I saw the wren hopping around on the ground, poking here and there, then the cardinal barreled into where the wren had been, chasing it off, then started looking into the same mulch and under plants. I wanted to cry, "Foul! -- Poaching!" LOL I guess they use similar "baby food".
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Something that struck me as particularly funny --

Back in early June, when the mulberry tree was *starting* to produce ripe berries and birds and animals that can climb were all over it from dawn to dusk, I noticed that tent caterpillars had made a tent nest on one of the top most branches.

There was no way I could get to it, not even by pressure hose, but all I could think was "What morons -- they really don't have any brains :lol:"

...sure enough, I don't think the tree lost much more than a handful of leaves to the caterpillars before the entire nest of them were dispersed. Why not? The birds stopped by for berry snacks for themselves and were able to pick up little baby food to take home. Or they came to get baby food and also managed to snatch a berry bite on the wing :twisted:
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Re: Birds are the Gardeners best Friend.

Another look out the window :

This time a male cardinal -- yes, it was a cardinal again :D -- he was pecking at something on a tomato plant/branch. Thinking it was a fruit, I was getting ready to bang on the window in hopes of scoring it, but I didn't see any color, only green. I looked on the ground too but no sign of fruit bits or skin. It really looked like the bird was pecking at a particularly thick stub of a branch with nothing on it... Then I saw it: it was a FAT HORNWORM! :o

...I just harvested a couple of fruits from that plant yesterday, too. Never saw it. :oops:

After a couple more blows, I guess he finally got the caterpillar to let go because he grabbed it and hopped down to the ground.
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