shwekhaw
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Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 10:46 pm

Bean plant dying?

Hi. I never planted bean before. But decided to try it this year in my organic garden. Bought the seed from home depot. The label says to start planting seeds after soil is completely warmed up in late spring. It has been warm since mid March in Houston. So I decided to try planting early. They were doing fine for a first 3-4 weeks although they not growing as fast as I expected. A couple of weeks ago, I started seeing some yellow spot on the leaves. Then, today many of them are like in the picture. Are they dying?

Here are some facts.

- Three nights ago, the temperature went to 50s for one night. It happened a couple of times before and plants were fine. So I am not sure the problem is due to frost.

- I also notice very small green small flies (1/3 size of regular house fly) which I used to see on my jasmine plants and lettuce plants. There are more than usual. They seem to like bean leaves more than others. I spray with organic pesticide couple of times a week to control.

- I inspected under leaves and on the roots of one plant I took out. I see no visible insect on the plant itself. In the ground I see very tiny (2-3 cm long) white worms in the soil. But not that many.

So what should I do. should I just wait until late spring and replant?
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hendi_alex
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Posts: 3567
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

Re: Bean plant dying?

Beans really like warm soil, near 70 degrees or warmer. I guess the cold weather could have burned the leaves. Most of the terminal, new growth looks o.k., so my guess is that they will be fine. Cool soil will sometimes stunt the plants to the extent that they never recover very well. Beans make a great crop for succession planting. Perhaps do a second planting, just in case this one doesn't work out. Each year I plant many plantings about a month apart, probably planting about 18 square feet of bed space each time. When the second batch starts to produce, the first planting gets pulls and the space is used for some other crop. Two 4 X 4 beds will give many batches of enough beans to feed at least two people, and sometimes will provide enough to serve up to 4.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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