JayPoc
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Location: Virginia, The mountains Zone 6a/6b

Collards question

I have some collards in long rectangular planters that I started a bit too late back in the fall. Anyway, they never did all that much, and most of what vegetation was there turned colors and withered during the winter. Anyway, yesterday I go to empty those planters and realized that I had little rosettes of viable new growth in there. I pulled out all the dead stuff, weeds, and debris, and side dressed them with a little composted manure. I've heard people refer to stuff like collards a biannual, but I wasn't sure what that means. Can I expect these to grow into full sized healthy plants, or will they quickly go to seed? Any tips to keep them from bolting?

Its liike 80 degrees today...this after 5 inches of snow last Thursday...lol...

gumbo2176
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Re: Collards question

I'm in zone 9 in S.E. La. and grow collards starting in late Sept./ early October and they last till it gets warm and go to seed. I pulled my collards out the garden 2 weeks ago when they started flowering. I got tons of greens off them in the meantime.

I won't grow them in warmer months since their flavor is enhanced with cool to cold weather and they generally get better after a frost or two.

JayPoc
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Location: Virginia, The mountains Zone 6a/6b

Re: Collards question

gumbo2176 wrote:I'm in zone 9 in S.E. La. and grow collards starting in late Sept./ early October and they last till it gets warm and go to seed. I pulled my collards out the garden 2 weeks ago when they started flowering. I got tons of greens off them in the meantime.

I won't grow them in warmer months since their flavor is enhanced with cool to cold weather and they generally get better after a frost or two.
yeah...I started my main plot of them and Kale in mid to late August, and had delightful greens most all winter. This was a second set of plants I started just before halloween as an experiment...

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

Re: Collards question

As long as they are making leaves, IMO, they can be harvested and eaten at any age. I tend to get tired of collards after many batches over the fall and winter, so generally feed them to the compost pile in mid March or so. My spring and summer steamed greens are usually kale and Swiss Chard. IMO the space is much better being turned over to some Swiss Chard. It or kale will likely grow faster, be more productive, and provide a higher quality product this time of the year.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

TZ -OH6
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Re: Collards question

Supposedly cabbage butterflies/worms like collards better than brussels sprouts, broccoli and the other 'cabbage monsters' so you can keep them around as a trap crop if you like even if they are bolting.

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

Re: Collards question

Bug trap, that is a great idea for anyone with space! Collards take up so much room though, I need the bed space for the new season.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex



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