mystang89
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Raising bed of garden

I was wanting to raise the garden to where it would be about 6-7" higher than the grass however I have perennials that have been planted in the garden and I would like to actually eat the food from them next year. Those perennials include Rhubarb, Asparagus, Strawberries and Grapes. Do I need to dig all those up and replant again or is there some other magic way of doing this that won't take a season or 2 worth of food from me. Thank you.

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applestar
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I think rhubarb and asparagus won't mind if you add to the depth while they are dormant, but strawberries will definitely need to be replanted since their crowns need to be slightly protruding above the ground. Don't know about grapes.

mystang89
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Thanks for the reply. I didn't know if I by putting another 6 or so inches on top of it if the rhubarb and asparagus would then be buried too deep to be able to grow healthily.

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jal_ut
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The asparagus and grapes will be fine with this. The strawberries will have to be dug up and replanted at the proper level. I hesitate to say about the rhubarb. No experience with trying that.

Here is a paper on the root structure and growth habit of rhubarb.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

mystang89
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Wow, thanks a lot everyone. That's great to know that the asparagus and grapes will be fine with the extra dirt. My strawberries weren't planted correctly in the first place so digging them up and redoing it would probably be for the best anyway. I JUST separated the Rhubarb this last spring but hopefully I won't have to re-dig again. They seem to be a hearty plant, especially if they survive me.

DoubleDogFarm
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The only one I would feel comfortable covering would be the asparagus.

Good luck
Eric

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applestar
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Ok, there ARE some warnings against planting rhubarb too deep. I think you could guard against this by leaving a well around the rhubarb crown and using loose mulch instead of soil.

I had a thought about the grapes -- If they are grafted, then it's not good to bury the graft. But again, well and sandy soil immediately around it might work.

Both cases I'm picturing something like bricks standing on end to hold back the surrounding soil -- similar to when raising soil evel around trees.

mystang89
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applestar wrote:Ok, there ARE some warnings against planting rhubarb too deep. I think you could guard against this by leaving a well around the rhubarb crown and using loose mulch instead of soil.

I had a thought about the grapes -- If they are grafted, then it's not good to bury the graft. But again, well and sandy soil immediately around it might work.

Both cases I'm picturing something like bricks standing on end to hold back the surrounding soil -- similar to when raising soil evel around trees.
I see what you're saying. I probably wouldn't be able to do that so I think digging them up and replanting them would probably work best in my case. Except for the asparagus, which is really the one I was most worried about since there are so many and I've had to dig them up almost each year and haven't been able to enjoy them.
So my plan as of now would be to dig up the rhubarb, strawberries and I think I MIGHT dig up the grapes and put them in the higher soil. I believe that is what would make the best, most producing plants in my garden atm.
Actually to be clear before I even do this I would like your opinions. I was going to do this because my neighbors don't take care of their yard which means all the burmuda grass, crab grass and violets come through the fence into my garden. I was figuring that maybe if I was able to lift the dirt high enough that I could keep out some of this grass. I DO realize that even if I do this that I will still be presented with some crab grass, burmuda grass especially and violets but I'm trying to temper the issue as much as possible.

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jal_ut
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Roundup!

I know some are not into using chemicals, but this is still the best alternative to those kinds of grasses.

Don't kid yourself, raising the beds won't keep it out.

Get some roundup and a pump up sprayer and go up the property line and spray a 3 foot wide swath. It actually works better if there is good leaf growth so lots of chemical gets on the plant. It will go down and kill the roots too. That is what makes it such a good alternative. It will get both grass and broad leaved plants.

Well, you will have to decide for yourself if you can use chemicals and what kind. Some I won't use, but find no big objection to roundup used judiciously.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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