Cheryl Litchfield
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Location: Cardiff

Growing my Cabbages (HELP)

I am a first time grower of vegetables and with some of my vegetables I am having great success. But I am having a bit of a problem with my cabbages. I have protected them with a mesh closh and look after them regularly as my gardening book suggests. My problem is that the Savoy cabbage I planted don't seem to be doing anything. They have grown some leaves but do not seem to be forming in the middle at all. I have planted some other garden cabbage and red cabbage and they are coming along nicely.

Please could someone give me a little advice as to growing them as I am only learning and hopefully I wont make the same mistakes next year. Also when the bottom leaves have turned yellow I am removing them. Am I supposed to be doing this or is that causing my Savoy Cabbage not to flourish?

I would be really grateful for any advice you can give me,, :(
Bat monkey chatting..

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GardenRN
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A yellow leaf is only sucking energy from the plant. No problems I can see with pulling them. But I guess you could ask why it's turning yellow. Is it a part of the cycle? like with tomatoes? or is there a disease on the plant? IDK anything specific about savoys. But I would say if it's growing, let it do its thing. :)
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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applestar
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I haven't tried growing savoys either, but have the feeling they are little more delicate than regular cabbages.

Different varieties take different lengths of time to mature. Do you know the days to maturity/harvest for the savoy cabbage variety you have? Compare with DTM for the other cabbages. That might be the only difference.

Yellowing could be watering issues. Too much or too little.

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jal_ut
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Yes, it could be the maturity date of the variety. Cabbage can be from 50 to over 100 days to maturity. Your savoy may be around a 90 day cabbage. However ,with any cabbage remember that it is a leaf crop. They require plenty of nitrogen to make those leaves. A cabbage plant will have a big floret up to 2 feet or more across with lots of leaves in that floret, before it will make a head. Full sun and plenty of water are a plus too. Good luck.
Last edited by jal_ut on Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:33 am, edited 2 times in total.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

Cheryl Litchfield
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Location: Cardiff

thank you all so much for your advice, I will read up some more on the cabbages and see what can be done to help them along, I am really grateful for you help . thank you
Bat monkey chatting..

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ReptileAddiction
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What helped mine produce a nig big head was fertilizing it every 2 or so weeks with fish emulsion. You can get it at armstrongs garden center. I see you live in San Diego COunty like me so I am fairly certain you have one near you.

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applestar
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Dr. Who/Torchwood fan here -- I thought Cardiff is in Wales.... :D

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jal_ut
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Oh. Forgot to say, "Welcome to the forum."

If you will edit your profile and put your location and growing zone in, it helps us to help you. Growing conditions vary so much around the country and techniques vary with it. We have to learn to cope with our local conditions.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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ReptileAddiction
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If they live in the Cardiff by me, they are in zone 8 to 10 more likely 8.

Cheryl Litchfield
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Location: Cardiff

Applestar - yes I am in Cardiff, UK, not the USA, even been to see the Dr Who Museum at Cardiff Bay. It is great.

To get back to my cabbages though. I do not know what zone I am in, How do I work that out? This forum thing is all new to me. usually I will just look the information up on the internet about my vegetables. But I thought it would be better for me to ask people who know.

I have treated my cabbages with a fish bone meal, yesterday and hope that it will help. What do I need to put in my ground for the acidity if it is that? I am not sure. I also swapped my cloth mesh closh with a plastic covered one in order to allow the sun to shine on the cabbages more, I hope that this will also help. I will keep you up-dated as to their growth.

Thanks all :)
Bat monkey chatting..

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rainbowgardener
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The zones are a USA thing - the US Dept of Agriculture has published maps dividing this country up into cold zones, by what is the minimum temperature usually reached in winter. It mainly helps you to know what trees, perennials, etc will survive winter in your area. The lower the zone number, the colder the winter. People sometimes refer to them as shorthand, on the assumption that zone 8, along with having a very mild winter will have hot summers and long frost free season. Sometimes true, sometimes not. But it would be somewhat difficult to translate to UK.

I'm not sure about the plastic cover. Cabbage is a cold weather crop. It does not like hot and it can get very hot under plastic.

Also fish emulsion is heavy on Nitrogen, but the fish bone meal would be mainly Phosphorus. Nitrogen would be a more important nutrient for a leaf crop.
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ReptileAddiction
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Where did you hear fish emulsion is high in nitrogen? That is not true. It has an NPK label like every other fertilizer. If you used raw stuff if would be but if you buy fish emulsion it is not.

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ReptileAddiction
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Zones in warmer climates dictate if it is to hot or to cold.



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