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jal_ut
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[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/banana_sq.jpg[/img]

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/hubbard.jpg[/img]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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jal_ut
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Ha. They still weighs more than that little girl!
She wanted that big pumpkin. I told her if she could carry it to the car it was hers. 8-0
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rainbowgardener
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So now what happens to your 100 pound pumpkins? Is anyone going to eat them?

(It is an amazing bounty of produce, that pile in your picture!)
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TheWaterbug
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jal_ut wrote:Yes, that is the scale from Amazon. Feels good to me.
Thanks for being the guinea pig! I just ordered one.

My pumpkin is still growing :D, and I'm thinking/hoping that soon it'll be too large to lift or move without mechanical assistance. I already have one herniated disc, and my orthopedist already owns enough expensive cars :P.

For lifting, I have two pairs of these [url=https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008ASBLJI/ref=asc_df_B008ASBLJI2192636?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=asn&creative=395093&creativeASIN=B008ASBLJI&hvpos=1o5&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4541214422058324995&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=]forearm forklift straps[/url]. They're basically just woven nylon straps about 2" wide that have sewn-in loops at both ends. I'm thinking that if I fasten them together above the pumpkins and drape 4 of them around the pumpkin, then I can pass a rope/belt/whatever through the loops below the pumpkin and cinch them together, like a purse seine net.

If I put the spring scale at the top, I'm halfway there. Now I need something like that come-along or hoist and something to erect above the whole thing to lift from.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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applestar wrote:Ha. They still weighs more than that little girl! :o
The 99 pounder weighs more than my mom. :lol:
I'm hoping for one that weighs more than me :)
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jal_ut
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I put the big pumpkins out front for fall decorations. No, I don't suppose anyone will eat them.

If you look at my total squash harvest though, there is a lot of food there. Even those small squash weigh 4 to 6 pounds. (except some of the acorns.) Those big blue hubbards weighed around 32 pounds and the bananas are that big too. I will see what I can sell at market, and put some away for winter use. If I cut one of the large ones, I will go visit the neighbors. :)

Ya, the long pink ones are called Banana Squash. I didn't weigh the largest banana yet.

Gee, at the store, winter squash is $0.98 a pound. Wish I could sell all of this for that price.

The football shaped ones are a Cucurbita maxima hybrid. Cross between blue Hubbard and Banana.
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ReptileAddiction
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How many acres do you have?

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jal_ut
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How many acres do you have?
My lot where my house is, is 1 5/8 acres. This is where my gardens are. I do have other acreage, but grow no veggies there. Its a mountain, really.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/mtn.jpg[/img]

93 acres on the mountain.

Here is a shot from the top of my mountain looking towards the Wellsvilles.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/5_28_2005.jpg[/img]
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TheWaterbug
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Is there gold in them thar hills?
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jal_ut
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There are stories..........................
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ReptileAddiction
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You grow all that on 1 5/8! You have gorgeous property. I am so jealous!

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jal_ut
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You grow all that on 1 5/8!
I grow all that on a lot less than an acre. An acre is 43,560 square feet. My actual vegetable garden space is about 8000 square feet. (roughly 1/5 acre).
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ReptileAddiction
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AI m very jealous.....

Northernfox
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8000 sq feet is 1.75 times larger than my property. Sad face

My largest pumpkin this year was a white one at 32 lbs
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Amazing harvest - so many pumpkins and squash!

Lovely photos of your land, too!

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Northernfox wrote:8000 sq feet is 1.75 times larger than my property. :(
It's OK.... check out my post at the bottom of this thread, about what I grow from 200 sq feet of veggie gardens:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=275278&highlight=200#275278

If you are growing 32 # pumpkins, you already know you can do a lot with a little space.
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So we had the third annual Pick and Paint Pumpkin Patch Party, and my two Atlantic Giants weighed in at 88 lbs and 142 lbs. The big one was the one I thought I'd killed two pages ago. I'll try to post some pictures tomorrow.

We weighed them by slipping two Forearm Forklift lifting straps crossed underneath, and then hanging those from the spring scale with a long rod. It worked pretty well, though I don't know how we'll lift it next year when I get one over 300 lbs. ;)
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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applestar
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Sounds great! Looking forward to the pics. :D

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jal_ut
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You go man. Hope you get a monster. I was shooting for 150 pounds, but mine were just short of 100. I think you really need to make a special dedicated effort to get the real big ones. I just plant them and let them do their thing. May be I should dig a pit this fall and put a wheel barrow of manure in it then plant on the spot next spring? And set up an IV with sugar water to run into the vine constantly? And pull all female blossoms except one? And water the area thrice a week instead of once? Any other tricks?
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jal_ut
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It was fun to look back through this thread. Now the season is done, I can report that the small squash like Butternut, Acorn, Spaghetti, and Delicata sold well at the market, but no one wanted a big one. I guess I grew them for decorations? I did take some to market and people would look at them and marvel, but not buy. We did eat one, and maybe can eat another one. I have one friend who wants one, but for the most part no one knows what to do with a big squash. They can be cooked then bagged and frozen for pies or whatever. My wife put some in some pancakes the other day.

I just finished up my garden plan and ran out of space for big pumpkins and squash. Maybe I won't even plant any next year? I plan to plant much more of the smaller varieties and try a new variety called Red Kuri, a maxima that is only 6 or so pounds. I still have the option to till up a punkin patch. Not sure I want the additional work .................
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applestar
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You know, at the supermarket, they sell bigger variety watermelons and squash cut in half or 1/4 and wrapped with plastic. Do you think people will buy them that way at our market?

Maybe you just need to get people to try them?

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My market rules don't allow cut produce unless you do it in an approved kitchen then refrigerate it. I do have an approved kitchen for bottling honey, but the refrigeration is a problem for anything so big, especially at market. My recourse is to just plant the smaller squash next season.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/squash_big.jpg[/img]
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WOW.... Jal_ut you not only grow fantastic veggies, but your place is SOoooooooo beautiful.

So glad it has a caretaker that appreciattes it, un-like developers. :(

If that big Hubbard was close to me, it would be getting cooked in "my" house. :wink:

I'm going to try growing "one" next year, I love hubbard squash.....yummy. :)

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You do have a gorgeous property. I'm rather green with envy. :mrgreen: We take Hyway 15 whenever we go to Salt Lake so we are somewhat in your area, we lived in Ogden many years ago when DH was in the military. Beautiful country if you head for the mountains.
I've been looking at the winter squash and decided I didn't have the room for the large squash and they are way too large for 2 people. You do grow some huge ones. I'm surprised that you couldn't sell them, though I guess a lot of people don't know how or don't want to can or freeze the extra. Do you start the seed early or just plant them in the ground?
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jal_ut
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I just plant them in the ground. May 5 is my target date, or as soon after as the ground is right. Gotta dodge the storms.
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applestar
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Wow that thing is HUGE! :shock:
I'm not sure I could heft it. No wonder your customers are hesitant about buying it. Maybe you could grow the Mini Hubbard varieties instead -- the come in all colors.

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TheWaterbug wrote:So we had the third annual Pick and Paint Pumpkin Patch Party, and my two Atlantic Giants weighed in at 88 lbs and 142 lbs. The big one was the one I thought I'd killed two pages ago. I'll try to post some pictures tomorrow.
I had no time to take any pictures during the party, so I asked my 40+ guests to help me out, and no one has emailed me anything yet :x

So here's all I have. The pumpkin itself:

Image

and the weighing:

Image

You can sorta see how we hung the scale from the pipe.

The pumpkin was smaller than I'd hoped, but it was _dense_. The 88 pounder wasn't a whole lot smaller than this one, but it felt like it was hollow.

This one felt like it was made of lead.

I'll have to see if I can get it in the wheelbarrow and up to the driveway for display. Without herniating something, that is.
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jal_ut
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So now what happens to your 100 pound pumpkins? Is anyone going to eat them?
I cut my largest pumpkin to take out the seeds. It had nice 3 inch deep flesh. I decided to take some in and try it for dinner. Frankly, I was disappointed. It had no flavor at all. Bleeeegh. Now I know why they are decorations.
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jal_ut
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[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/squash3.jpg[/img]

On the left, a Hubbard Squash.
On the right, a Banana Squash
In the middle a Hybrid of the two.

I ate a Hubbard a week ago. This week I am working on the Hybrid. WOW, it is a good squash. I don't think I have ever had such a nice squash. Great texture and flavor.

I will try a Banana when this hybrid is gone.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

dustyrivergardens
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wow such great looking squash and huge. also very nice pumpkin you did better than I ever have 100 plus pounds that is still huge.

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rainbowgardener wrote:
Northernfox wrote:8000 sq feet is 1.75 times larger than my property. :(
It's OK.... check out my post at the bottom of this thread, about what I grow from 200 sq feet of veggie gardens:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=275278&highlight=200#275278

If you are growing 32 # pumpkins, you already know you can do a lot with a little space.
I do very much enjoy my small garden. The 32 lbs pumpkin was grown in a 2' by 2' box of 2/3 winter compost almost no degradation when I planted and 1/3 grass to keep the smell down and soil to start in. It grew on a trellis 3' off the ground and was the only pumpkin I got from that plant.

One day I hope to snag a 100lbs pumpkin :) next year possibly!

That being said I won't have much time to baby them as my wife and I are expecting our first child in March! A baby boy to grow my pumpkins for :)
Stephen

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ElizabethB
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How about zuchini bread with all of the excess fruit? Make it now and freeze. I make mini loaves to give to friends and family at Christmas.

Yumm!
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

Northernfox
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That is a great idea!!! Ill have to get a larger freezer lol
Stephen

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jal_ut
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March! A baby boy to grow my pumpkins for Smile
Hey, that's great. Congrats.
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