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jal_ut
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Big Daddy Onions

Big Daddy onions are awesome.

[img]https://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n289/jloft/Garden/onion_bd.jpg[/img]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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gixxerific
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Looking good. My onions did poopy this year, same ones I grew last year that were flippin' huge.

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applestar
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Nice! I'm slowly getting better with onions, but have long way to go. Every year, I learn more -- this year's conclusion is that onions really don't tolerate less than full sun, and they don't like drought at all.

I have a cardboard box full of cueball and racket ball sized onions. Good enough to feel good about and actually good sizes for short order cooking. :wink: I also managed to grow a good number of onion set sized onions but I doubt I can save them until next March. :roll: ...maybe pickled onions. :idea:

SOB
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Nice!

What I learned this year is that I need to make sure I plant the sets (the bulb type) with the tip barely under the soil or even poking out. I can tell the ones that I planted too deep because they have a MUCH thicker stem with little bulb. The ones I planted properly have a thinner stem with a huge bulb.

Are those good storage onions? If I recall you get them from somewhere in texas - can others buy them or do you have a secret place? :D

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jal_ut
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I get them from the local garden store. They do come out of Texas as little onions.
[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/onion_plants.jpg[/img]

They store quite well if you get them properly dried.

To get large onions you about need to start from little plants or sets. If I plant seed, I get small onions about the size of walnuts or smaller. I always plant some seed, but use the onions as green onions, not to go for dry. Some of the best green onions are from a variety called White Bunching Onion. Planted from seed. These don't form bulbs.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DoubleDogFarm
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gixxerific wrote:Looking good. My onions did poopy this year, same ones I grew last year that were flippin' huge.
That's funny Dono, I must being growing the same variety as you. I won't be growing Poopy onions next year. :wink: I got a late start on my Copra onions and the spring was cool and damp. :( I'm also thinking the soil fertility wasn't there.

Excellent onions James. Big Daddy eh! Looks like Territorial Seed Co. sells plants.

Eric

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gixxerific
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I grew Candy and Red Candy. It was either soil or weather. Cause Candy was huge last year basball to sofball size or bigger, biggest onions I have ever gotten. This year baseball to puny the Red Candy's were all very small. They plants died out way too early like month's early.

I almost got Big Daddy last year from James' success and braggin in the past. I will order some this year. The weather just screwed them this year.

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jal_ut
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I grow some Yellow Spanish onions too. They do not get as large as the Big Daddies. As far as flavor the Big Daddies are a milder onion than the Spanish onion.

Yes soil fertility is a must for large onions.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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gixxerific
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I had my onions in a newer section of garden so fertitliy is in question as to why mine didn't do good. But I have tomatoes in there that are kicking some major butt even better than some (same variety's) in my more established garden.

I really think it was weather realted. It got so dang hot so fast. Both my onions and my garlic were done WAY too ealry.

greenstubbs
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jal_ut wrote:I get them from the local garden store. They do come out of Texas as little onions.

[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/onion_plants.jpg[/img]
I wonder if those are Dixondale's? I grew there's the year for the 1st time and it's been the best onion year for me. I did plant them 3 months earlier then years past, maybe that has something to do with it? Guess I need to start my seeds sooner?
JAL- Just courious why you harvest those before the tops brown and droop/drop? I've popped some of mine early like that and they were good. My seasons done with mine and they are just sitting in the ground as I have no storage space and just dig em up as needed. Nice harvest though.

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jal_ut
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I needed some onions for market. People buy them for using not storage. Yep, if you were going to store them, best to leave them in the ground until the tops have fallen and started to dry up. I will smash the tops mid August if they haven't fallen by then so they will get dried before freezing weather. Our frost can come about mid September.

Yes, onions need to be planted early. As soon as you can get on your ground. Here that is usually early April. This year it was mid March.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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