User avatar
ReptileAddiction
Greener Thumb
Posts: 866
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 12:52 am
Location: Southern California

I agree you have awesome pics. I want pics of your fruit trees please? That would be awesome. Now that I have in ground fruit it is by far my favorite thing to grow. Currently I only have a dwarf peach. A blueberry and a grape. The grape was just planted in the ground and I will hopefully get grapes for the first time next year. This year I harvested about 5 medium peaches and about 10 small ones. Plus about a cup or 2 of blueberries. My peach tree should have another 10 inches of fruiting wood on each branch so next year my peach harvest could easily double. Plus all the lemons and stuff that will be going in mid winter. 8)

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:43 pm

Reptile, Go over to the Fruit Forum. :)

Eric

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7453
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2009 10:20 pm
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

wow they do look super healthy where about's do you live in Utah
Northern Utah, Cache Valley, a little town called Paradise.
I always love looking at your photographs. And here I thought Utah was just desert!
Utah is a high mountain desert for the most part. A little corner of Southern Utah is a much lower desert.

I have mentioned before that those who settled much of Utah diverted the streams and built reservoirs and canals for irrigation. Without that we would not be raising much of anything, except dust.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
GardenRN
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1102
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2011 10:01 am
Location: Chesterfield, Va

Peaches......you must not have squirrels in UT. :evil:
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

User avatar
ReptileAddiction
Greener Thumb
Posts: 866
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 12:52 am
Location: Southern California

We have tons of squirrels but instead of tree ones they live in the ground :?

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:43 pm

GardenRN wrote:Peaches......you must not have squirrels in UT. :evil:
or San Juan Island

Eric

dustyrivergardens
Green Thumb
Posts: 617
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2011 8:32 am
Location: Holbrook Az. zone 5b

Well you have a beautiful spot on this here earth enjoy it...

User avatar
digitS'
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3589
Joined: Sun Sep 26, 2010 1:10 pm
Location: ID/Wa! border

applestar wrote:Looking great James!

Sun, eh? Something to think about.
So the shorter number of growing days are compensated by number of high quality sunshine hours? (kind of similar to Alaska where they practically have no nights during the available growing days. ... And Steve gets an hour more sun each day.... I guess Eric should get more daylight too, except he gets more cloudy days..... Interesting....8)
Warmth:

Most warm-season plants make minimal growth unless the average daily temperature is above 50°F. Cool-season veggies may get by with 40°. These are averages between highs and lows and those can't be too extreme since plants will shut down at say 90° and if the overnight temperature is approaching freezing, not even peas will make any real growth during that day.

Low Utah humidity will mean that James has extremes to interfere with his gardens. There will be what seems to people elsewhere, enormous swings between the cool at sunrise and the warmth at mid afternoon. Plants don't necessarily like that - James has convinced them to thrive, in spite of it.

Pointing out that there's so much more daylight time for someone who lives where it is always cool, like on the northern Pacific coast, is just a way of say - we are all in this together.

Steve
We are each other's harvest; we are each other's business; we are each other's magnitude and bond. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7453
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2009 10:20 pm
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Low Utah humidity will mean that James has extremes to interfere with his gardens. There will be what seems to people elsewhere, enormous swings between the cool at sunrise and the warmth at mid afternoon.
Sure the truth. This morning just before sunrise it was 62° here and now at 10:45 AM its already up to 94°. Yesterday it got up to 98°. Its predicted to hit 102° today. Well........ I watered the garden last night, so maybe the corn and squash will like it. Have a great day!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-



Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”