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IndyGerdener
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How to get the hottest peppers

How do I get my peppers the hottest possible? any watering suggestions, when to pick the pepper, or any other suggestions?

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rainbowgardener
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Keep them lean and mean, give them the least amount of fertilizer and especially the least amount of water you can, consistent with keep the plant healthy. (Water the plant normally while it is little, once it is a good size and fruiting, restrict the water.) Leave the peppers to completely ripen on the plant.
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luvthesnapper
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I noticed a difference in heat in my habaneros when I starting using Azomite, last year. They were hotter. There was also more of them.

gumbo2176
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I find my peppers get hotter when the temperatures rise. I have a couple Jalapeno pepper plants that over-wintered this year and it produced peppers sparingly during the cooler months, but they had little heat. Now, as the temperatures are into the 90's every day, my peppers have much more sting than a couple months ago.

Matter of fact, I cut up 3 of them to put into a Tex-Mex casserole I made for tonight and didn't wear gloves when seeding and dicing them and my left hand is on the toasty side right now.

Gotta be careful if I get an itch around the eyes or I'll light myself up.

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I have only canned my jalo peppers in the past (picklin' them I think it's called). If you add a small amount (1 tsp or so) of olive oil to the vinegar it will make the peppers and the pepper sauce much hotter. I don't know how it works, but I was told this many years ago and I can tell the difference in jars that have or have not had olive oil added.

How do you normally put your peppers up? I've heard of freezing them, but have never tried it.
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gumbo2176
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Brown Thumbs wrote:I have only canned my jalo peppers in the past (picklin' them I think it's called). If you add a small amount (1 tsp or so) of olive oil to the vinegar it will make the peppers and the pepper sauce much hotter. I don't know how it works, but I was told this many years ago and I can tell the difference in jars that have or have not had olive oil added.

How do you normally put your peppers up? I've heard of freezing them, but have never tried it.
I'll put my peppers up simply by pickling them in a vinegar brine. The brine consists of vinegar, water and salt. In my opinion, they really don't need much else to be good.

If I'm pickling some green beans I'll add red pepper flakes or a Jalapeno or two sliced up along with a clove of garlic thinly sliced to the brine to give them some zing. I use most of my pickled green beans in Bloody Mary's, cut up in salads, or simply eaten on their own.

I've never frozen them but have frozen excess bell peppers and they lose a lot of their texture that way. I find they become a bit mushy when thawed and are only good for use in cooking.

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IndyGerdener
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I have planted my peppers in with all of my other plants in the garden (See the youtube video in my signature) any ideas how I can reduce the water on them but keep the water up on the other plants?

Do japs get hotter when they turn red? or if they are green when is the best time to harvest?

I am growing the ghost peppers, and want them to be as hot as they are rated when it comes time for me to indulge!! :twisted: :lol: :shock:

Normally I will cold pack my japs and habaneros . I like the crisp when you eat them. I will add onion to my mix of water, vinegar, pepper, garlic, and salt. My FAVORITE is pickling habaneros normally and adding hard boiled eggs to the jar. SPICY PICKLED EGGS!!!! YUMM!!!!! :lol:

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madonnaswimmer
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IndyGerdener wrote:Do japs get hotter when they turn red? or if they are green when is the best time to harvest?
I have always been told that jalapenos go through phases:

light green (spicy)-----> dark green (spiciest)----->black/red (sweet).

For that reason, I always pick them they they are dark green, just as they begin to get the striations (stripes) on them.

Jeremy brua
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Useing a little oil when you pickel them will make them sceem hotter. I think the oil makes the heat stick to your mouth. But be careful not to get the oil on the rubber seal it will break it down and make it sticky.

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ThePepperSeed
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IndyGerdener wrote: I am growing the ghost peppers, and want them to be as hot as they are rated when it comes time for me to indulge!! :twisted: :lol: :shock:
Follow the advice from others about watering and I would suggest you pick them right as they become ripe. The riper they get the less they can get...although with the ghost peppers heat is usually not an issue :D

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soil
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Highly mineral rich soil along with some stress makes for hot chilis without upgrading to a new type of pepper
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

mattie g
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madonnaswimmer wrote:I have always been told that jalapenos go through phases:

light green (spicy)-----> dark green (spiciest)----->black/red (sweet).

For that reason, I always pick them they they are dark green, just as they begin to get the striations (stripes) on them.
I like jalapenos and serranos when they're red. I can't tell that they lose an heat by that point, but the flavor and slight sweetness you get when they turn red just makes them taste that much better!

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IndyGerdener
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soil wrote:Highly mineral rich soil along with some stress makes for hot chilis without upgrading to a new type of pepper
There is not really much hotter that I can go from the ghost pepper!! I am a bit of a heat junkie. I love the burn, at that heat level it is more of a scorch than a burn though :lol:

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soil
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I find the mineral rich soil increases flavor as well which is what I want most. Heat is can be chosen with variety.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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IndyGerdener
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like the

Well here in central indiana we have some of the richest soil around. When i was planting my garden there were at a minimum 4-5 worms in each shovel full of dirt. Our soil resembles potting soil with its rich color and smell.
My peppers taste great, just lack heat. I love the flavor of the ghost pepper as well as the heat!
Have you eaten a completely ripe habanero? Are they sweet? I do not like the taste of that pepper

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IndyGerdener
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I picked one this morning that was dark green and had light stripes. was definitely the hottest pepper ever.

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