cryssy29
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Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:01 am

First garden ever...helpful tips?

Hey all! I'm new to gardening. Below I've got some pics to my first attempt at making my own veggies.

I'd love some reviews, comments, suggestions. I've done hours of research online, but nothing beats the advise of the actual green community.

Thanks!

[img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7083/7394744442_57ebbb207c_z.jpg[/img]
[img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7086/7394746082_05163ddc32_z.jpg[/img]
[img]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8165/7394746466_c9094a0c9c_z.jpg[/img]
[img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7243/7394746892_7a99e720a3_z.jpg[/img]
[img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7224/7394743540_3a0dfa8b33_z.jpg[/img]

****P.S. I'm in central NY, located in Zone 5A.
Last edited by cryssy29 on Mon Jun 18, 2012 7:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

barrelslime
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Location: St. Louis Metro, IL

Looks good so far. :lol:
" Let us endeavor so to live, that when we come to die, even the undertaker will be sorry." Mark Twain

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rainbowgardener
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Location: TN/GA 7b

Looking pretty good... You didn't say where you are located. In most parts of the US this is a bad time to be growing broccoli and lettuce, which are cool weather crops and really don't like hot. You can help them along a little by putting some shade cloth (loosely woven stuff that filters the sun but doesn't block it) over them. Keep them well watered. But if despite your best efforts, they don't do well, you can start them over in Aug or Sept (depending on your climate) for a fall crop.

The little cucumber (I think) plants in front of the trellis in the second picture are not looking happy. Not getting something they need. If they haven't been planted there very long, you can just keep taking care of them, lots of water and sun and soil nutrients and hopefully they will perk up. If they have been there a few weeks, something is really wrong.

Otherwise everything is looking good. Keep us posted how the topsy turvy's work for you. Not everyone likes them or gets good results from them. What kind of tomatoes do you have in them? The consensus seems to be that they work better for cherry tomatoes or dwarf / patio varieties.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

cryssy29
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The pic you thought were cukes are actually zucchinis. You're right, they are very sad, not sure what they're lacking. They were my first and biggest transplants a few weeks ago. I was so proud of them since they "were" thriving. I've treated them the same as the rest of the plants inside the raised bed.

I'm growing beefsteak tomatoes, just not letting them get the size of cantaloupes. :) When I get them the size I'm happy with I'll set out to ripen.

mscratch
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Location: S.E. Mo.

I think the zukes were most likely not transplanted deep enough but being they are still young you can still do that..

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jal_ut
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Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Zucchini, and cukes, and all other squash are best grown from seed planted where it will grow. They do not take well to transplanting. Those look like they were growing in poor light and were stretching for the sun. When you put them out in direct sunlight, they go into shock. This is pretty common with squash type plants grown in the house. I would just give it some time, and fertilize them when they get some new dark colored leaves.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-



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