mhannum
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Looks like a fun spot for pumpkins - good luck!

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TheWaterbug
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Unbelievable! Nearly all my JOLs are emerging already, and it's only been 3-4 days!

I've started them in cups in previous years, and they've taken 10-14 days to emerge. Jal_ut may be on to something here . . .
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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TheWaterbug wrote:Unbelievable! Nearly all my JOLs are emerging already, and it's only been 3-4 days!
Here's a Jack-o-lantern as of this morning:

Image

I put the seed in on Saturday, into some dampish soil, but I didn't water it in until Sunday morning. So this is really just 4 days in, and it's up!

I think another factor that delayed germination in previous years was I was planting directly into 100% potting mix, which is really coarse and loose and doesn't hold much water. Even though I was keeping it pretty wet, there just wasn't enough contact with the seed to transfer water to to it.

Now that I'm direct sowing, I'm mixing this potting mix with my native clay, and the texture is much denser. It also has little opportunity to dry out, since I drip-watered the hill for a few days before planting to charge the soil a bit.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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Here's a better picture:

Image
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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Lookee here:

Image

This is my Atlantic Giant plant, less than a month after direct sowing seeds into the soil. My other pumpkin varieties are doing similarly well. They're not quite this size, but they all have plenty of full-sized leaves, and it looks like they're ready to start vining.

I'm going to conclude that jal_ut is correct about direct-sowing these. In previous years I've started the seeds in starter cups and then transplanted after 4-5 weeks, and there's no way they were this size when I transplanted. They were probably 1/4 this size or smaller.

This weekend I'll hit them with some fertilizer, too. I didn't fertilize in previous years.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

dtlove129
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Good luck. I think I lost my giant pumpkin plant with all this heat. It looks really bad. My 2 smaller pumpkins look pretty good considering our weather lately.
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TheWaterbug
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TheWaterbug wrote:Lookee here:

Image

This is my Atlantic Giant plant, less than a month after direct sowing seeds into the soil.
Here are my two Atlantic Giant vines, 8 weeks + 3 days after sowing:

Image

I'm surprised that my partially-shaded one is outgrowing the full sun one. It probably has twice the leaf area. This weekend I buried the secondary vines and added some more drip line to give the secondary nodes some water.

I've been snipping off female flowers that started too close/too early. I've read that I need to select a fruit that's 10-12 feet from the plant's origin, to give the vine enough slack to rise off the ground as the fruit grows.

My "regular" pumpkins are also vining like crazy, and I'm guessing that the fertilizer is helping there as well. I already have some fruit that are the size of a normal cantaloupe, so I am way too early this year. Again.

Based on my results closer to Halloween I may delay planting next year until July 1st or so.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

Northernfox
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looking great! I have to go vertical to get that kind of space ;) I just hope I get the development.
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I'm guessing that the fertilizer is helping

What did you use for a fertilizer :?:
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Looking good. My pumpkins are ahead of yours, but then I have to plant about May 5 to get them mature by mid September when our frost comes. I fertilized mine three times with urea. Yes, the fertilizer makes a big difference. I am starting to get some pretty good fruits. With another month to grow they should do well.

You can still side dress them with some fertilizer if you want to.

Have fun!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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TheWaterbug
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bell7283 wrote:
I'm guessing that the fertilizer is helping
What did you use for a fertilizer :?:
I'm using [url=https://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202519325/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=liquinox&storeId=10051#.UCM3FI4-fhE]Liquinox Grow, 10-10-5[/url], diluted 4 capsful to a 2 gallon watering can.

For the rest of my pumpkin patch I'm using a 1 pint fertilizer injector with my drip system.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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Here's one of my Luminas:

Image

It's supposed to be 95 days, and this is only 60. It's supposed to grow up to 12 lbs, 8-10 inches tall, and "ghostly white" by the time it's done.

It's still got a tinge of green to it right now. I need to get a cage over it before the peafowl peck it to death.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

bell7283
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Urea???

Nice white pumpkin!



jal_ut wrote: I fertilized mine three times with urea.

What other plants like a fertilizer with that much nitrogen?

I ask because I have a wild pumpkin in my front yard.... By wild, I mean the squirrels ate my pumpkin off the door step last fall and now I have a pumpkin growing in my front yard. But its doing pretty good. Now I want to get the most out of it. If urea can be used for other plants besides pumpkins, I may order some.


[img]https://i1076.photobucket.com/albums/w447/bell7283/DSC_0047.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i1076.photobucket.com/albums/w447/bell7283/DSC_0046.jpg[/img]
Zone: 6A

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TheWaterbug
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Here's the rest of the patch:

Image

Regarding the nitrogen, I've read that you're supposed to use nitrogen-heavy fertilizers early, to get all the leafy growth, and then switch to a mix with more potassium to promote fruiting.

I've pretty much got all the vine and leaf that I need, I think, so I may try to find a higher K fertilizer this weekend.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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TheWaterbug wrote:Regarding the nitrogen, I've read that you're supposed to use nitrogen-heavy fertilizers early, to get all the leafy growth, and then switch to a mix with more potassium to promote fruiting.
Dunno [url=https://pumpkinnook.com/howto/fertile.htm]how authoritative this is[/url], but it's generally consistent with what I've read elsewhere.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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The coming week looks really good for pumpkins!

Image

Rapid vining!!!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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Nice temps, but you will need to water! :)
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TheWaterbug
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I've got an automated drip system :)

There's no way I could handle 30 plants if I watered manually. I tried that my first season, and it took me more than an hour. And that's when the plants were small!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

bell7283
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I wish we could share some of our rain. Its been so rainy here the past few weeks, I'm now fighting a small mold problem. It rained so hard yesterday we had small flash floods, which I'm sure won't help my mold issues!

On a happy note, there is finally green grass again.
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TheWaterbug wrote: then switch to a mix with more potassium to promote fruiting.

I think I might try this. I only have the one pumpkin on my plant so I would love a few more before its to late. Thank you
Zone: 6A

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Fig3825
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Hey Waterbug, I sent you a PM regarding your panorama setup. You may not have realized I did so (or you are ignoring me). :)

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TheWaterbug
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Fig3825 wrote:Hey Waterbug, I sent you a PM regarding your panorama setup. You may not have realized I did so (or you are ignoring me). :)
Hmm. I sent you an email a few weeks ago. But anyway, I figured this is something that can be shared more broadly, so I just pasted it into a [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=270027#270027]posting in the Other forum[/url].
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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This may be the only redeeming feature of Apple's new mobile Maps app, but the satellite imagery appears to be newer than Google's. I do believe this is my grid of pumpkin plants, whereas Google shows horses in the paddock (e.g. before I bought the house nearly 3 years ago):

Image
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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The 3rd Annual Pick-and-Paint-Pumpkin-Patch-Party, presented by Painted Peacock Productions, (aka PaPPPP pbPPP) was a success! We had about 50 kids and about 100 pumpkins, so I let each kid take as many has (s)he wanted. Some of the kids took 3 or 4, which meant some of the parents went home carrying 5 or 6 :D

The Luminas were very popular, and every single one got picked, save one hiding under some pretty spiny stems. They also tolerated being early very well, as none of them rotted, and they didn't even get the bumpy callouses suffered by the JOLs. My 3 Lumina vines also produced pretty well, and I think I got 10-12 decent-sized fruit, total. They were dense and heavy, and the skins were beautifully smooth and uniform.

The Jarrahdales were a mixed bag. One of my 3 vines died, so I only had 2 left, and those 2 produced 6-7 fruit, but they got peacock-bitten, so some were grossly misshapen. The biggest "problem" with these is that the fruit aren't brightly colored, so they ended up being hidden under the foliage, and a lot of the kids never even saw them. But those that got picked were well used, and produced some very artistic results. Here's a Jarrahdale, the 4th pumpkin chosen by this young neighbor of mine:

Image

The 15 Jack-O-Lantern vines (including volunteers) were fine, as always. I got 3-4 fruit/vine, but they don't tolerate sitting on the ground for 6 weeks very well. I have ~15 that rotted to unusability, and another 15 that the kids "just didn't like" because they got those bumpy callouses on the ground side.

Of the ~30 pumpkins I have left over (of varying quality) I doubt I can use more than 5-6 for food, myself, so my neighbors' horses will get a few.

I also grew some Sugar Pie and Spooktacular, but I couldn't really tell them apart from the small JOLs because the vines grew so rampant and criss-crossed each other. But the small pumpkins (of any type) were very popular amongst the girls who didn't want to carry a big honkin' fruit.

My two Big Max vines made 2 decent size (20-40 lbs) fruits apiece, which I put a few at the top of the driveway and at the front door for decoration. The other two were taken by ambitious kids, much to the chagrin of their parents who had to carry them home :D

I may try jal_ut's suggestion and grow a few Connecticut Field vines next year.

And the Atlantic Giants' [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=277741#277741]tale is told, here[/url].

All in all, a very successful pumpkin season, and I'm already looking forward to next year!!!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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jal_ut
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Way to go. Happy Halloween.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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jal_ut
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I may try jal_ut's suggestion and grow a few Connecticut Field vines next year.
Connecticut Field is a great pumpkin for jack-o-lanterns. Howden is also good. These are both pepo types.

My big ones this season were Prize Winner F1 Hybrid. It is a maxima type.

Dill's Atlantic and Big Max are maximas too.

I saved the seed from my largest pumpkin. Since it was a hybrid to start with and I had other maxima squash (Hubbard and Banana plus a hybrid) in the garden this year, they could be crossed again. No telling what a feller might get next year, but it will definitely be a pumpkin. You can have some seed if you want to try?

I paid $1.00 each for the seed of the Prize Winner F1 Hybrid. Right now they are out of stock every place I have looked. Maybe the new stock
hasn't came in yet?
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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