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Amy Is Growing
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Location: Riverside CA

Size of transplants into new raised beds?

Hi all,

I've got an assortment of seedlings I started which are almost ready to be transplanted into my raised beds. My assortment includes peas, tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, lettuce, spinach, cabbage, broccoli, radish. I realize I'm late in the season, and not everything will survive the hot California sun. Lucky for me, I have been able to start my seedlings at work. They spent their nights in my office and their days moving around my deck chasing the shade. They are now outside 24/7, getting morning sun and evening sun, but shaded during the hottest part of the day.

My question is at what size are they safe to be transplanted into my raised beds? Thanks for any words of wisdom you can share.
Amy Lynn

"Grow old along with me, the best is yet to be."

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rainbowgardener
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"My assortment includes peas, tomatoes, zucchini, peppers, lettuce, spinach, cabbage, broccoli, radish. "

You are right about late in the season. May in Riverside, CA is definitely too late to be starting cool weather crops. That includes the peas, lettuce, spinach, cabbage, broccoli. Sorry, but you will not be pleased with the results. I really wouldn't bother trying. If you have the plants and want to try anyway, find a shady spot and keep them very well watered. But they may not do very well even so.

The tomatoes, zucchini, peppers should be fine. Other things that you could be planting now include beans, corn, other things in the squash family such as cucumbers and melons.

Re transplant size, a range of sizes will work. As long as you have sturdy, healthy plants a few inches high and with at least two pair of true leaves, they should be fine, though if they are bigger than that, that's ok too.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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Amy Is Growing
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Location: Riverside CA

Thanks...like I said, I realize it was too late to plant them, and I know not everything is going to survive. I didn't plant my garden last year because it got too late, and I decided I would try anyway this year even though it was too late before I got a chance to get it started. I'm practicing for a successful early start next year. :D Besides, I learned a lot from starting my seeds this year that will help me this year. Plus I found this site, which has been loads of help. I guess anything that doesn't make it will end up in my compost bin.

I do have corn and beans going too. I might try some cucumbers or melons. I've built some shade structures too to keep our harsh sun off my young plants. Thanks for the info on sizes of the plants for transplanting. I will remember the two pair rule. And I'll remember your words of wisdom for next year when I get an earlier start. I should have made my forum name "better late than never". ;) Thanks again.
Amy Lynn

"Grow old along with me, the best is yet to be."

sciencegal
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Some things like lettuce, maybe cabbage, spinach and radishes you could start in the fall in your area. Territorial Seeds has a fall crop catalog with lots of information on starting things later in the season. You still have plenty of time to experiment.

I live in an area with a very short growing season so I start almost everything under lights in the house. Root crops such as radishes are an exception. They aren't supposed to do well as transplants. I also start peas and beans outdoors. I've had 4 inches of snow, in early May, on top of young peas. They do fine.

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Amy Is Growing
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Thank you science gal...love your avatar. I checked out Territorial Seeds, I'm going to plan for fall since it's not that far away.

Until then, I'll do my best with what I have. We had some really hot days this week, up to 93 degrees. You have snow in may, I have crazy heat! So far, all my seedlings are doing surprisingly well, and I'm learning a lot in the process.
Amy Lynn

"Grow old along with me, the best is yet to be."

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jal_ut
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Hey! I think its worth a try. Transplant them immediately and see what develops. Nothing to lose.

Another year, plant the early stuff from seed where it will grow. Not much use starting it in pots for transplanting. The things that we really benefit from starting in pots are tomatoes and peppers and other warm weather plants which have a rather long season requirement. Starting them lets us get enough growing time in. ( Us who live where we have a short growing season. ) Have a great day!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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rainbowgardener
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Well mostly. For me the cabbage and broccoli benefit from an early indoor start as well. They are slower growing and they don't do very well once it gets hot. In my climate if I wait until I can plant them outdoors, by the time they are maturing, it gets too hot for them and they may not make heads (especially the broccoli). I start them indoors in late Jan-early Feb and put them in the garden mid-March, a month ahead of my average last frost date.

If you lived where it didn't get hot so fast, you probably could direct seed them in the garden. I direct seed them in early fall to overwinter.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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jal_ut
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rainbowgardener, you could likely plant your broccoli mid February, outdoors where it will grow . Just for fun try it as soon as the snow is off.

I don't usually get the chance to plant until in April, but this year it warmed up mid March so I planted all the early stuff. It is all doing good. We have had several nights get down to 28°, and some snow storms, but it doesn't bother the cabbage. lettuce, turnips nor broccoli. They really are cool weather crops. :)
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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