cshell1958
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Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: N Tx

Need some ideas on fixing a kind of big mistake in soil! jav

:oops:
Here it is:
After organizing some family n friends; sourcing materials; drawing plans;starting seeds indoors; checking for sun n shadow areas...etc; Trucked in yard of compost,got 40# of green sand, 44# of Azomite, had 16-17# of coir 30# of aged alpaka manure, some mycoz, liquid kelp n fish hydrolysate to use for foilar feed/wetting. And of course, what is said of best laid plans... After starts n seedlings in ground and all looked good ah, a day of rest well scratch that! I felt compelled to go over notes and records again and realized I failed to have someone pick up the bag of vermiculite!

I've got 1-4'x8' bed and a 4'x4'bed 6" deep but will build up to make it 12" where tomatoes are(have another 4x4 not using because the coco was not as much as needed)

What is a plan for correcting/compensating for in this situation? So far all can think is auto/semi-auto watering. I'm in North Tx near Dallas/FtWorth By mid-June or so it will be near constant 90's Plan was/is to have harvest most stuff by then unless it likes the heat or is part shaded by trelis or other elements.

This is year 2 for mejavascript:emoticon('-helpsos-')
Any help would be wonderful

Dillbert
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if you mean the missing vermiculite, don't worry about it.

with all the organic material - compost & coir & manure . . . the soil will stay light & loose through the first season - you can dig in the vermiculite next season.

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stella1751
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Many gardeners avoid vermiculite for two reasons: 1) The production (excavation) is not environmentally friendly, and 2) It isn't native (?) to certain regions so is unnatural in certain areas. Here's a thread where we discussed its use, kind of a pros-and-cons thread [url]https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18177&highlight=vermiculite[/url]

I use it, still have the bag left that I bought way back when. I forget to use it most of the time, but now that you have reminded me, I will probably use it up this year. I will then go back to perlite for water retention capabilities because I believe it does a better job of lightening heavy soil and reducing wind/precipitation compaction in raised beds.

You should be fine without it 8)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

cshell1958
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Joined: Tue Jun 14, 2011 2:23 pm
Location: N Tx

Thanks

Thank you both so much for easing my mind and I'll look into it more. While I was looking for answers prior to here I found a site with a ton of info and research on perlite in mix or sole growing medium. Interesting, to help mitigate drought issues.
Thanks again! pphew :D

Next season maybe add perlite cuz of our drought conditions
Pass it on with a smile!

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stella1751
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That's why I use perlite or vermiculate. Our average annual rainfall up here is 14 inches. The big difference between the two is, I think, that vermiculite flakes lack the water-storing capability of perlite, and perlite lacks the nutritional boost (?) provided by vermiculite. However, neither appears to degrade, at least obviously, so you don't need to re-amend the soil every year. I never forget to add it to a new bed, but I do forget the established beds on occasion :oops:
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

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