AM_16
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Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 1:43 am
Location: Ontario, Canada

Made a small garden

We have large ones in the back yard but this year I made one just for stuff I want to grow and try my hand at gardening. I put it behind the shed, it gets full sun. It cannot be seen from the property unless you go back there so its hidden away. Its 4.5 by 4.5 and about 6 inches deep. I just need to add more dirt. What type of dirt should I add? I was just going to put in some top soil and use manure when I plant

[img]https://i1141.photobucket.com/albums/n599/Maligator_88/CIMG0603.jpg[/img]

denny27
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Location: north carolina

You could use soil conditioner to fill it up which the nursery here uses a 50/50 mix of compost and topsoil to make. I use it when I plant new shrubs or flowers to fill in around the root ball. I also used it when I started some raised beds several years ago. The plants did great right off the bat and each year I mix in some compost and they keep doing great.

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PunkRotten
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Looks pretty good. Try added some compost.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I'm not seeing how ths area can get full fun when it's surrounded on three sdes with walls/fence. But you might get away with it due to th light colors.

I agree compost and top soil. Maybe a bag of compost and two-three bags of topsoil or two bags of top soil and one bag of potting soil.

If you have access to manure, it should be composted/aged and should be mixed into the garden at least a week but preferably 3-4 wks before you plant (especially if ou are not sure how well composted it is). What you decide to grow here will also determine just how much manure you should add -- too much can be detrimental.

Keep us posted. :wink:

AM_16
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Location: Ontario, Canada

I was back there and it gets sun...the shed isnt high either. To the right is a shed thats only 7-8 feet high.

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applestar
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Just to be clear, "full sun" is usually defined as 6hrs or more of direct sunlight.

Good luck with your special garden. :D

AM_16
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Location: Ontario, Canada

So I cant grow anything back there now? I don't want to waste all this money on dirt and effort if I cant grow anything :(

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applestar
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Oh, no. I'm not saying that at all. :wink:
We just need to figure out what can do well and what might do OK, and what will definitely not do so well.

So, what did you *want* to grow here? It will help to track the sun for a whole day, and also remember that as the season progresses, the sun will get higher in the sky and the shadows will get shorter. Also, as I said in my first post, because the surrounding walls are light in color, sunlight will be reflected. IF you are able to paint them WHITE, it would be even brighter.

Oh, yes, we can definitely work around any potential issues and help you plan a great little garden. :D

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PunkRotten
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If it doesn't get full sun for the 6+ hours you still can grow some things. Like AppleStar said, keep track of the sun and where it shines through the day. See how many hours it gets in a certain place. Then from there you can figure out what you can grow.

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