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xoxo
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Scarlet Runner Beans

I've been looking into the different types of running/climbing beans, and now I'm leaning towards the Scarlet Runner Beans. I've never grew this plant before, so any key information, links, or tips is greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!

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Gary350
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I use to grow these 25 years ago every summer on a trellis around the patio. They are vines with nice red flowers.

Bobberman
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I grew three plants last year and planted them 6 nches appart in a partialy shadded area in red dog and soil area.. The red flowers were very nice and I got about 50 beans about 6 inhes long for seeds this year. It really climbs so put it somewhere where you can enjoy it! The leaves looked like poison ivy leaves but the over all vine looks nice!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

DoubleDogFarm
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I've been growing Scarlet Emperor for many years.
Very nice flowers
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20%20%20Vegetable%20Garden/DSC02443.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20%20%20Vegetable%20Garden/DSC02330.jpg[/img]
Very productive
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20%20%20Vegetable%20Garden/DSC02449.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20%20%20Fruits%20and%20Vegetables/DSC01097.jpg[/img]
Some don't like the stronger bean flavor and others think they are tough and stringy. If you pick them young 6" or smaller they rival any other bean.

Eric
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Fri Mar 09, 2012 12:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Bobberman
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Very nce DD what would we do without you! Thanks!
I enjoy fishing ,gardening and a solar greenhouse! carpet installation repair and sales for over 45 years! I am the inventor of the Bobber With A Brain - Fishing Bobber!

gumbo2176
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Re: Scarlet Runner Beans

xoxo wrote:I've been looking into the different types of running/climbing beans, and now I'm leaning towards the Scarlet Runner Beans. I've never grew this plant before, so any key information, links, or tips is greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
Last year I planted Rattlesnake beans and Japanese Yard Longs on my trellis. The Rattlesnakes are a good size bean that is a pale green pod with light purple flecks and the pod is a bit fuzzy, like a Kiwi, to the touch. My wife didn't care for the texture of the pod, but I liked them. They do lose the purple color when cooked.

The Yard Longs are a very prolific bean and one of the fastest growers and producers I've ever had. Both were planted at the same time, but when the Rattlesnake beans were only halfway up the trellis, the Yard Longs were reaching the top and putting out lots of flowers. This year I decided to put in 24 ft. of Yard Longs and should be able to harvest a couple bushels of beans from them. They are great raw in a salad, grilled, made into a casserole, cooked down with ham and seasoning and I pickled several quarts of them after cutting them into reasonable pieces.

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jal_ut
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Are you wanting them for eating or for the flowers?

There are several popular varieties of climbing beans. Blue Lake Pole Beans have been very popular. These have white blossoms and nice snap beans.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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xoxo
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Thanks! You guys are quite helpful! Love seeing the pictures.

I want them to cover a wire dog kennel. I have chickens inside the kennel, and they're silkie chickens, and they could really benefit from the shade. I have read they're safe for chickens to eat, as many other chicken farmers use them for shade. I will definitely try the beans myself, but I really want them for the shade and looks (flower).

My kennel is a 10 x 10, and I want to cover the front East facing side, except the door, so that's probably about 7 ft in the front. Then I want to cover half of the North and South facing side, connecting it to the East side, so that's 5 ft on each side.

So my question is now, how many plants will I need for the front (7 ft) and each side (5 ft each)?

Thanks!!

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applestar
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In my garden, Scarlet Runner beans tend to have a slow start. They do get going sometime in late July to August and keep on growing and producing until frost kills them.

I wonder if you might have a better luck if you mix regular pole beans with Scarlet Runner for ealier full growth. Also, regular pole beans languish in the height of the summer heat and either die or hang on until cooler weather and start up again. That was certainly the case with Purple Podded Pole beans
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=82245#82245

I suspect that Runner beans do better in the heat, but if that's not the case, then you may want to also consider including the southern heat tolerant beans like the ones gumbo mentioned or southern peas. California black eyed peas tried to swallow up my 5' picket fence one year. They also basically didn't take off until late July here though.

This way, your chickens will get the shade they need from the earlier maturing pole beans as well as the later maturing runner or other beans.

DoubleDogFarm
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Most catalogs recommend 1" deep and 2"-4" apart. 20 to 30 seeds to the ounce. Average 4 seeds per foot.

Eric

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!potatoes!
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runner beans are perennial in warmer climates...anyone had any luck perennializing theirs? I'm assuming you need to avoid frost completely?

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applestar
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I tried digging up the massive hunk of root one year and putting it in the garage. But that was the year we had a super cold winter dropping to teens by late December and on down to negative single digits all through January and Feb. and the the whole thing froze. I think it needs to be warmer than freezing... Maybe needs to come inside? I wonder what the minimum temp you have to have is.

I think that time, I decided to try again before the vine is frost killed, but I haven't had the chance since. (Last year, the runner beans were planted where there was no way I could get to the roots, and the year before that was my Winter Pepper Torture experiment and I had no room....)

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xoxo
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I usually plant my garden on Good Friday, so I figured I'd plant these on Good Friday too, which is April 6th. I've considered starting them in cups indoors first too, but I'm not sure if I will.

I know some of you up North don't do garden until later, correct? So with me planting them in early April, do you think that gives them enough time to get started good, or should I mix them with a faster growing plant, like applestar suggested.

Thanks! :)



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