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GardenRN
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Moved asparagus....again.

I finally figured out where I want the permanent asparagus bed to be. After reading a good bit on their preferred soil types, I made a new raised bed. I filled it with a mix of topsoil, composted manure, sand, and wood ash. From what I read, this should be conducive to some very happy asparagus roots. I dug up my 10 roots that I started last year, and have room for 24 more.

Fingers crossed! Hopefully I'll get to eat some this year. The roots are 3 years old now I believe. A couple are pretty small still, but most are quite large and bulky. Actually, I'm sure it's because of the crazy temps, but while I was digging them up I saw that one of the roots was sending up a stalk already. It was about 2" long and stark white. Took me a second to realize what it was!
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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jal_ut
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[url=https://www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/010137veg.roots/010137ch6.html]You need to check this out![/url]

You can quickly see that you are doing your asparagus no favor by moving it.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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GardenRN
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Thanks for the link! I don't think I did too bad. I have moved them twice, but both times were during their dormant stage in this winter. Certainly, any time you have to move something like that it's not great. However, in this case, given then type of soil in my yard, and placement, I think that the pros out weigh the cons. They are in MUCH more appropriate soil now, that was directly mixed to the recommendations for the plant, as well as in a raised bed, in a part of the garden where they will get plenty of light and not be blocked by other plants.

I'm with you though, I hated to have to move them.
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

dustyrivergardens
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Great article thanks...

GardenGnome
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I put some in a spot but but they didn't have the greatest soil or have been weeded.
I'm pretty more rebooting myself on gardening they 3 years old planted for a year.
Do you cut them to the ground for winter?
Gilson (Giles) Zone 7b

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GardenRN
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I don't know what others do. Last year was too early to harvest from mine. So I just let the ferns grow out all year and do their thing. I didn't cut anything. I suppose when they die you could cut them back. But why?

Unless someone knows a reason for it?
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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!potatoes!
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as long as they're out of the way by the time the new ones are coming up, i don't think it matters.

GardenGnome
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Ill read the link you posted tonight. Thanks
Gilson (Giles) Zone 7b

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jal_ut
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Yes, at the end of the growing season, cut the ferns off at ground level. They can go in your compost bin. Come spring the plants will send up new shoots. These are what we crave to eat. They can be clipped for six weeks, but then you need to let them grow up into ferns again. The ferns are the leaves, and with the aid of the sun, make food to be stored in the roots. It is this stored energy that enables the plant to send up lots of shoots next year.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

GardenGnome
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Cool ill cut mine.
Anything special they like to eat?
Gilson (Giles) Zone 7b

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jal_ut
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The time to fertilize asparagus is when the harvest is finished and you are going to let it grow up. Compost would be good.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

2cents
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Manure and fall leaves in the fall.

You may want to read this article, for more fertilizer info.
https://www.novatech.com.ph/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=75:asparagus-production-with-bio-organic-fertilizer-bof-durabloom&catid=22:other-articles&Itemid=140

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