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jal_ut
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What are you growing this year?

Corn, beans, squash and potatoes are said to be the main producers for the home garden in this area. A lot of food can be grown with these four varieties. These are must haves.

The cole crops are great too. Cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, turnips. broccoli, cauliflower, and mustard.

Then some green salad goodies, lettuce, radish, green onions, spinach, chard. Spinach and chard also good as cooked greens.

Oh ya, don't forget carrots and other root crops, beets, onions, These can provide a lot of food. They can really put on a big harvest.

Watermelon, cucumbers and cantaloup are a must.

I almost forgot peas, tomatoes, peppers parsley and dill. The garlic is already planted.

I did already mention squash, but I should elaborate on that, I want crookneck, zucchini, patty pan, hubbard and butternut plus pumpkins.

Oh my, where am I going to put all this stuff?
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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jal_ut
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[url=https://www.extension.iastate.edu/publications/pm607.pdf]Varieties IA[/url]

[url=https://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/HG_313.pdf]Varieties Utah[/url]

[url=https://extension.missouri.edu/p/G6461]Tomatoes Mo[/url]

[url=https://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1386/HLA-6032web.pdf]Varieties OK[/url]

Here are some links to some good info provided by various extension services. You can probably get some info for your specific area if you google "garden varieties (state)" Have a great garden in 2012.

Happy New Year!

PS [url=https://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/ag-06.html]Good info for NC[/url]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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rainbowgardener
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Here's a link to where I posted what I am planning for 2012:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=41422&start=0

I'm also hoping to get a couple beds in a community garden (that is all fenced!) If that works, I will probably do peas and then corn in one and spinach and then squash in the other, maybe plant a corner of one in asparagus. I have an asparagus patch, but it is too shady, doesn't do real well.
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PunkRotten
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I would love to grow my own corn but don't have the space. maybe I can do one of those small variety in a big pot.

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GardenRN
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Staples=Corn, tomatoes, lettuce, spinach, cukes, beans, garlic, and onions. Basil, dill, oregano, lavender, sunflower also.

Other stuff I will be growing include but are not limited to :)....Swiss chard, tomatillos, Yacon, various gourds and squash, etc.
Jeff

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Intriguedbybonsai
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I'll definitely be growing some cucumbers on a trellis this year. I love them! Eaten out of the hand with a little salt, marinated in a vinaigrette, in a salad, pickled, you name it.

My grandfather used to plant the bush type, and white wonder in his garden. I had an aunt that used to make homemade pickles from the Armenian variety. Very good indeed.

I guess I'll give some tomato plants a try too, but only for my girlfriend. I personally have never liked the taste of tomatoes. I know a lot of people love them, but the taste makes me cringe with disgust. Now if it's ketchup, tomato soup, pasta sauce, etc then that's a different story.

So I had people tell me it's because I have never had a home grown tomato. Well I tried just that. I bought a cherry tomato, and yellow pear tomato plants at a garden center last year. They fruited, I tried them, and yuck! :?

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jal_ut
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People's tastes are different. I like most things in the cabbage family, but hate Brussels Sprouts. Yet, others crave it. Ick!

We haven't had much snow this winter and right now my garden is bare. It feels like close to planting time when the ground is bare. Fat chance, its 28° and most likely I won't be able to plant until April ---- snow or not.

Happy New Year!
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

DeborahL
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PunkRotten, get one of those $5 round, plastic tubs at Walmart. The ones with rope handles.
Drill some drainage holes and you can grow just about anything.
God must think highly of animals - He created them before creating us !

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PunkRotten
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Yeah but then potting soil gets expensive. I am also going to use up a lot of the pots I have now and I am trying to think of where I am gonna put everything. I am gonna have pots everywhere LOL. But you know, I may still do it. I like corn a lot. How many ears of corn would one plant/stalk give you?

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GardenRN
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PunkRotten wrote:Yeah but then potting soil gets expensive. I am also going to use up a lot of the pots I have now and I am trying to think of where I am gonna put everything. I am gonna have pots everywhere LOL. But you know, I may still do it. I like corn a lot. How many ears of corn would one plant/stalk give you?
At most, 2. Many times only one though. Depends on variety and growing conditions.
Jeff

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Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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GardenRN
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DeborahL wrote:PunkRotten, get one of those $5 round, plastic tubs at Walmart. The ones with rope handles.
Drill some drainage holes and you can grow just about anything.
If you can do some planning, I have seen those tubs marked down to as low as $3.50 at the end of the spring. Regularly at $4. Patience.
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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rainbowgardener
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PR - I wouldn't have space for corn either except that I am getting a community garden plot (I found out that is confirmed!). Look around where you are, community gardens are very common these days.

In fact there's even websites that will help you find them, e.g.

https://acga.localharvest.org/

if you type in community garden then your zip code, it will show you some community gardens near you. But I tried it, so I know it doesn't know about all of them, just a few of the most established ones.
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gixxerific
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I'm not growing a garden this year.

Yeah right, I plan to have at least 30 varitety's of tomato than whatever else falls into place.

I have garlic in already, onions will also be a must. I will also have lettuce, carrots, radishes, basil, sweet potatoes, potatoes, melons, peas, beans etc.

dustyrivergardens
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I told myself I would only grow 15 variety's of tomatoes. Well that has changed and I have 4 more beds to build right now I am up to 30 variety's some one stop me from looking at these tomato magazines.

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rainbowgardener
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If you only grow one plant of each variety, that's 30 tomato plants. If all goes well, that's something like 1500 tomatoes (lots more if they are grape/ cherry tomatoes, a bit less if beefsteaks). What do you do with all that?
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dustyrivergardens
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My daughter is 16 and I make her earn her own money so she spends time helping me in the garden. we do put up cases and cases of tomato sauces catsup and hot sauce but she earns her money at the farmers market selling tomatoes that's how she pays her car insurance and has gas and spending money. sorry kids I believe you should earn your money... lol I guess my folks did that for me and I believe in it.

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gixxerific
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I said 30 variety's or so but I'm noping I can get about 50 plants in. I sold some to the local produce stand last year. I may try the farmers market this year. You can always give them away too. :wink:

I know a guy on my tomato forum that grew about 7000 plants last year. He sells to resturants for about 6 - 8 bucks a pound and they can't get enough. That is something I am considering as well.

Dusty is there any certain variety you looking for?

dustyrivergardens
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gixxerific- I really don't need any more BUT I am looking for a good green variety and yes for resale something that holds well in the 6 to 8 oz area dosent crack. and also a Italian heirloom. Costoluto Genovese I grew this one 5 to 6 years ago and quit growing them and did not save any seeds. dumb dumb the reason I quit growing them was they did to well I was tired of giving them away.

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gixxerific
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dusty sorry no greens here but I do have Cowlick Brandywine x Costoluto Genovese F3. You won't find this in a catalog. Not quite Costoluto Genovese but should be a good one. If you are interested I could send a few. Pm me so we can get this thread back on track. :wink:

Dono

brandon558
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i don't have a huge garden..but i plan to start Garlic and onions asap. As spring gets closer im going to start my tomato plants by seed this year or attempt to at least. This will be my second season gardening.

I plan to make a few 4'x12' beds

Plan to plant strawberries early spring

Few herbs

Beans, Bell Pepper, Hot Pepper, Cucumbers, Okra, Tomatoes, Squash, and more im sure.

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rainbowgardener
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brandon - for future reference, the garlic and onions may do better for you fall planted and over wintering. I plant mine in October and they over-winter just fine and my winter is harsher than yours. But they need a long season to bulb up. But planting them now should work for you with your longer growing season and ground that isn't frozen.

If you start seeds indoors under lights, you could probably start peppers and tomatoes soon, so they get a jump on the season. I usually start peppers indoors in late Jan and tomatoes indoors in mid-late Feb for transplanting into the garden mid to late April. Peppers especially are slow growing and take about five months from seed to peppers. If you wait until the ground is warm enough to plant them outdoors, you won't have a very long productive season.
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rainbowgardener
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Just put in my seed order!!

sugar prince peas
ultimate opener tomato
big boy tomato
bloomsdale long standing spinach
guardsman scallions
leaf lettuce blend
basil red rubin
borage
leaf celery
chive
cilantro defino
summer savory
scarlet runner beans
bell boy pepper
derby green bush bea
honey bear winter squash
purple millet
moonflower
cardinal climber
white alyssum
climbing snapdragon
geranium mixed colors
bunny tail grass
impatiens lilac
marigold mixed colors
wave petunia mixed colors
double cascade petunia mixed colors
red annual salvia
tithonia fiesta del sol

and one plant of the Rosemary Madeline Hill, because I couldn't find it as seeds and I really want to try the hardy rosemary.

As usual got a little crazy with the seed catalog, but hey all that is $79 and many of those packets will last me 2 or 3 years.

That is of course not everything I'm growing, because I do have lots of saved seed.

I always try to do something(s) I've never tried before. This year it's the leaf celery, cilantro, and summer savory.

YAY!! I'm so excited, seeds are coming!!!!
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!potatoes!
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don't even know where-all I'm growing this year. once i figure that out, i'll get to the 'what'.

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jal_ut
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Scarlet runner beans

rainbowgardener, you mentioned scarlet runner beans. I am curious how you use them? I first planted them for the beautiful blossoms, but then learned the dry beans were very good for whatever you put beans in. Are the young pods good to eat?
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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rainbowgardener
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Yes, when they are young they can be cooked/ eaten just like green beans. Later on the pods get more tough/fiberous. At that point you can just shell the beans and cook them.

I grow them on the trellis on my deck because they are more ornamental than regular green beans.
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Avonnow
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Rainbow Gardner

I love your math and "Pray" you are right, I have all my seedlings out - I started them in small 4" pots - the weather has been so nice - they are growing very well. The ones I did in my dome actually had to catch up to the ones in the pots. I have them all out on my potting bench and if it gets too cool, I just wheel them inside. Anyhow I am trying about 20 different tomatoes, this has to be the year of the tomato for me, I really want to find a few that do well in Florida to use year after year. I have yet to have anything stupendous in the way of tomatoes. I also did them all from seed - no more box store - the last set I did for this fall were from Walmart and a small local nursery that sells Burpee - they were awful and I do believe alot had some sort of blight - they were dying from the bottom up and even though they produced some, they were a far cry from summer. The blight thing scared me as I found some articles about this being a issue with the big retailers and they were spreading these plants all over the US. I have to do more research or post a separate post. But other then the tomatoes, peppers, cucmbers and beans. I will also try Tomatillo's - they just look neat and we love Salsa Verde so what the hey. I am going to skip the eggplant and Okra till summer - family is just not a fan. So I am going to see what others are trying and maybe try something else new. :D I am getting all excited looking at seed magazines and starting to probably buy way to much. Good Luck to everyone. Especially Jal ut - you probably get all antsy about now just waiting. It always proves peofitable for you and I talk about you all the time with my friends - all the pictures and stuff you can grow. If this housing market ever changes I would love to move where I can have more space and land. :wink:
I love this! - There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.

ShawnKirkpatrick
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I'm planting corn, green beans, slicing cucumbers, pickling cucumbers, tomatoes, Tommy toes, cayenne peppers, bell peppers, squash, watermelons, cantaloupe, pumpkins, iceberg lettuce, romaine lettuce, cabbage, sunflowers, maybe some onions. That's about it! :D

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8)
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.

dustyrivergardens
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wow onion heaven

gardenvt
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Our 2012 garden will include:

Herbs: basil, cutting celery, chives, cilantro, dill, oregano, parsley, sage tarragon & rosemary

Main garden: arugula, lima beans, beets, brussel sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, eggplant, garlic (planted 11-1-11), kale, leeks, lettuce, peppers, radish, scallions, shallots, spinach, 12 varieties of tomatoes and turnip.

New this year: baby lima beans, celeriac, garlic and turnip. We had kale last year but will be growing several new varieties this year. I dried it and it makes great chips and wonderful in soup at this time of year.

As for those brussel sprouts, if you roast them with EVOO, garlic, walnuts and a bit of balsamic vinegar, you would be so surprised how wonderful they are. I honestly believe that the cooking method makes a big difference in the taste of many veggies, especially root varieties. I couldn't get hubby to eat many veggies before I put in our garden and now he is asking for more brussel sprouts, kale, eggplant, turnip and even cauliflower and beets that have had the roasting treatment.

Anyway, it sounds like we all have some interesting gardens for 2012. I'm hoping for a drier gardening season this year.

Brant
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This year

Well my peppers are already up! Tomatoes will follow soon. This year I planted early girls and some yellow varieties. I am trying my hand at mustard in addition to lettuce and a couple herbs - basil and oregano.

I am also doing the regulars - green beans, onions, snow peas (is it too late?), and soft squash.

The season is nearly here!
Brant from Phoenix

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jal_ut
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Too late for snow peas? I don't think so. Get them planted. Plant them now you should be eating them about April 1 when I am just planting peas. :)
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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soil
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i have snow peas sprouting right now, and i have some overwintering outside amongst the old amaranth and corn stalks.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

amalgamate
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Here's all that I plan to try growing. Hopefully it'll work out better than last year, when the drought and bugs killed almost everything.

sugar snap peas
romaine lettuce
broccoli
brussels sprouts
kale
bell peppers
jalapeno & cayanne peppers
"fooled you" jalapeno peppers (I'm a wimp! These aren't hot.)
tomatoes - roma, beefsteak, and heirloom
corn, hopefully heirloom
field peas
lima beans
green beans
squash - summer, zucchini, and acorn
pumpkin
cucumber, slicing
watermelon
cantaloupe

Herbs/flowers:
basil
cilantro
sage
rosemary
marjoram
mints
marigolds

I also have blueberry, strawberry, and raspberry plants that I hope will be ready to produce this year.

amalgamate
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Surprised by seeds!

I just found a bag of seeds tucked away in my fridge from last year that I had forgotten about! I was not looking foward to the amount of money I was going to spend on seeds, but that's just been drastically reduced. On top of what I just listed, I found a few more in the fridge that I want to grow:

Dakota Black popcorn
Spinach
Spaghetti squash
Butternut squash
Lemon cucumber (anyone tried this one?)

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jal_ut
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I am really enjoying everyone's comments on this thread. Looks like there are some great gardens in the making.

amalgamate, yes, I have grown those many times. They make an interesting fruit about the size of a lemon and its yellow. Hence the name. They have a mild cuke flavor.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

plainsman50
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Hi everybody. Great thread.

Here's my plan for the spring:
February: Start seedlings indoors of lettuce and petunia
March: Start seedlings indoors of tomato and pepper (both sweet and hot). Set out onion transplants from Dixondale Farms. Transplant lettuce seedlings. Sow seed of lettuce, radish, carrot, and beets when soil temp reaches 50F.
April: Transplant tomato, petunia, and store-bought parley seedlings. Sow bush beans, perpetual spinach beet, New Zealand spinach, cucumber, and summer squash when soil temp reaches 55F.
May: Transplant pepper and store-bought eggplant seedlings. Sow okra, crowder peas, watermelon, cantaloupe, pumpkin, zinnia, cosmos, Mexican sunflower, morning glory, cardinal climber, scarlet runner bean, and hyacinth bean when soil temp reaches 60F.

At the summer solstice start again on three and a half month span of planting for late summer, fall, winter and spring vegetable harvest and flowers.
USDA Zone 7, AHS Heat Zone 8/9, Sunset Zone 10, Altitude 3,035', Average Annual Rainfall 20", Ecoregion Llano Estacado

btrowe1
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Location: South Glens Falls Ny,Zone 4B

32 tomatoe plants 16 big size varietys (Big Zacs Belguim giants) and 16 paste varietys, (amish, romas,san morzanos) 32+ pepper plants, ghost peppers this year, hungarian hot and inferno for pickling, habs, lots of sweet bells and some big daddys, 12 brussel sprouts, 12 big type cabbages for Kraut, lots of onion sets, white though squirrels eat the reds, zucchinis, pickling cucumbers and a few for slicing,Spaghetti squash (keeps pretty well for a few months) bush beans, blue lake 274 type seems to grow good here and freeze really well. We'll also do some cherry tomatoes from the bottoms of our hanging baskets. and I'll do a few Thai Hot pepper plants in pots because they look nice and then add them to my pepper flakes for the heat.. I'll probably pick a special thing ( not sure maybe a broccili, but they never get big heads up here) to add to a pot and place on the deck for a conversation piece. I usually place a tomatoe on the deck also for the looks, possibly a belgium or a Zac this year, last year I had a chocolate cherry tomatoe in a pot but it grew weird in that every foot it grew I got a vine of about 8 cherry tomaotes, it was indertimate so you get the picture, not so good on a deck. Can't wait to get started for the year..

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jal_ut
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I bought most of my seed the other day. This season I am going to plant two varieties of broccoli, Packman, which I have grown many times and Premium Crop, for a new variety here.

Also planting Howden Pumpkin, an old standby, and Prize Winner Pumpkin. These are supposed to get big. They sell the seed priced per seed. I think I will find a plot for them where they will not cross and go for the seed.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

GardenGnome
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I'm doing alittle bit of everything started seeds inside and over did it.
Ill try to keep them alive to give or trade with friends. A friend across the street ordered seeds with me and we traded half of each with eachother. I ended up with a box full of seed packets. I must have 10 or so diffrent peppers 7 tomatoes. Cabbage and other cold crop stuff acouple diffrent pumpkins orange with white stripes,giant AL,big white and some that are blue. Did some trades on this forum and got about 5 diffrent watermelons to pick from. I'm doing the ones I ordered that I ordered that are orange on the inside.
And picking one I was traded I have some potatoes planted some garlic and onions,blueberries,fruit trees,rasberries and some diffrent canes. Strawberries and so much more all I'm hoping is for the weather to get outa wack and give me some rain.
Gilson (Giles) Zone 7b

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