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rainbowgardener
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Mine has three small green peppers left on it; I cut most of them off to bring it in. Since this is all an experiment anyway, I think I will see what happens the way it is. It is indoors in the (more or less) warm house, with some additional light (not as much as it could use, but what I could do). So the idea isn't for it to go dormant, but just to keep going. I imagine if I lived in the tropics that's what it would do.

If it looks like it's not making it, I will cut it back further.

Continuing the fall work, actually shut down the first couple beds, weeded out, cut everything back, pulled off some of the old mulch to compost, getting ready to put some more down. Brought in a few more tomatoes and peppers that were still out there and ALL the rest of the basil, no more out there!!
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stella1751
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Fall work: Yesterday I harvested all the peppers and what was left of the tomatoes. I have peppers hanging from every protrusion in the house. One of the plants gave me 55 peppers ranging in size from 1 to 3 ounces.

Once the peppers have been in the house for at least a week and there is no danger of a stray fungus gnat showing up, I will bring in a big pot of potting soil to begin my experiment with the seeds that didn't germinate this spring. I have no houseplants, so fungus gnats can't stay alive for long in my house, right?

Today, if I can find the time, I will prepare one of the beds for garlic. Tomorrow, the forecast high is 44. On Wednesday, the forecast high is 38. Then we have a stretch in the 50's. I can't decide whether it will be better to plant garlic before or after the two-day cold snap. I think after would be better.
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soil
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your really worried about fungus gnats? i consider them more of an indicator species rather than a pest. if you have them your soil is out of balance.

what soil so you use?

i have pepper plants that haven't even had one pepper ripen. some of these thai's take forever. and the chili tepins never even bloomed this year lol.
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stella1751
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I am not worried about fungus gnats; I am terrified of them. My soil must be sadly out of balance! I use my own soil. Not in the house, though. I use Miracle Gro Drought Control in the house. However, I killed a fungus gnat yesterday on one of the peppers I brought into the house. He must have just been hanging around the plants. Therefore, I want to wait at least a week before I bring any soil into the house, just in case there was one I missed :shock:
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soil
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I use Miracle Gro Drought Control in the house.
thats why!! that crap is loaded with pests and pest eggs. your better off sticking with some healthy compost from your garden imo. and IF it does come with fungus gnats, chances are there is something else that eats fungus gnats.

horrible choice in soil sorry to say. mix your own and youll never look back to bagged soils.
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garden5
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Well, that light frost on the ground yesterday was enough for me to go out and pick everything. The frost messed up all of my peppers last year and I really wanted to beat the frost this year.

There are still some chilli peppers that are on the plants that have not ripened yet. These are plants that are in gallon pots that I want to try to over-winter. However, these potted plants are bulkier than I expected, so I'm thinking about cutting down the plants and putting them in smaller containers, like 4" pots.

However, they are currently outside and I have not been strict about bringing them in for the night. Once I can get more peppers to ripen, I will probably cut the plants down then.
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applestar
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Trust this lazy gardener. :wink:
If you are not ready, just dig them up with garden shovel -- plunge deep diagonally from three directions and with the third, scoop up and put in a doubled plastic grocery bag. Bunch them in the garage and rig some lights over them, and you've gained another two or three weeks as long as you remember to water them once in a while. :wink:

You can trim off unwieldy excess upper foliage at this point and try to root the cuttings, but my experience last winter is that peppers take a long time to root and the new shoots don't start until late winter/spring. Survival rate atrociously low for me, and by that time, the winter-started seedlings are almost as vigorously growing. So I don't think I'll be trying to overwinter peppers by propagating from cuttings again.

HOWEVER, if you do manage to pull it off, the cuttings will start to bloom right away and will have a strong headstart over seedlings.

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jal_ut
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Nice day today, but its supposed to get down to 32 tonight and 22 Wednesday night. 22 will definitely put an end to everything. I will try to get everything buttoned up tomorrow and ready for the cold one Wednesday.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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stella1751
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jal_ut wrote:Nice day today, but its supposed to get down to 32 tonight and 22 Wednesday night. 22 will definitely put an end to everything. I will try to get everything buttoned up tomorrow and ready for the cold one Wednesday.
Ditto. Today or tomorrow we get our first snow. Have you planted your garlic yet?
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stella1751
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Yep. It's over. It's snowing outside. That always feels so odd the first time it happens each fall.
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rainbowgardener
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I imagine it would, since in my mind snow is a winter thing, not a fall thing. We often don't get our first snow until January, usually not until Dec.

I'm not moving to Wyoming! :?
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rainbowgardener
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Little update, my basil and pepper plants have now been indoors about two weeks. The basil has lost most of the leaves it had when it came in, but that's ok because it is putting out new growth like crazy. It is not a very pretty looking plant right now-- the bottom foot or so is all bare brown wood and then the top has lots of bright green new growth and even a couple of little white flowers. I'm assuming that I can't cut back into the bare wood where there are no leaf nodes and expect that stem to grow any more. So it may forever after look a bit strange.

The pepper plant has kept most of its leaves, though they still look a bit droopy. They were looking all chewed, so I finally found a little brown caterpillar that had managed to come in with it! Put him in the kitchen scraps bucket where it can munch away until it gets dumped on the compost pile outdoors to finish its normal life cycle. The green pepper plant is being slower to put out new growth, but does have a number of tiny baby new leaves. The three little peppers that I left on it are slowly growing.

So far, so good, but they have a lot of months to get through before spring!
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SPierce
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It's definately over for us now... with all the snow and the ice, any veggie plants I had outside (except for my carrots) are dead and gone. I'm heartbroken- no pumpkins for me this year I guess, even late!

I'm freaking so happy that i brought the bell pepper inside and into the kitchen. It looks a bit miserable, but is otherwise doing alright@

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jal_ut
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Ditto. Today or tomorrow we get our first snow. Have you planted your garlic yet?
Yes. Monday I tilled the plot and planted garlic. Next planting will be in April.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

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