garden5
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All I can say is.....you have wild peacocks in your yard :shock: !!!


Those have always been something I only associated with the zoo :lol:. If you don't want them, send them my way!
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TheWaterbug
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cynthia_h wrote:I had in mind getting in touch with the trapper the city plans to hire and asking him/her for a recommended approach to reduce the number of birds. Will the trapper be using traps and taking the birds to a sanctuary? Will s/he trap and euthanize? etc.
If I'm reading the reports correctly, the trapper was taking them to a peafowl farm in the LA area, where the farmer bred and sold them, presumably to other, likewise-insane :D peafowl collectors.

I'm guessing trapping and removing them in any meaningful way would be very expensive. There are probably several hundred within a 1/4 mile of here, so any peafowl vacuum would likely be filled right back in. Nature abhors, &c.

I've had pretty good success keeping them away from my tomatoes with some simple bird netting. The peafowl are _terrible_, terrible fliers, and anything they can't walk to, they avoid. They won't fly into a small, fenced-in area because they don't feel confident about getting airborne and out in a small space.

I've got the row covers on right now, and I might consider a bird netting barrier after stuff gets tall enough.

garden5, believe it or not, [url=https://www.peafowl.com/videoblog_files/7fcb5c7984e9dd4d7057fa75f7700bbe-48.html]you can actually ship peafowl by USPS[/url], even if they have full tails/trains.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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applestar
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Wow, it sounds like you need to protect your garden like you would with any pest animal/bird -- with fences, cages, and netting. Some people get groundHOGs, raccoons, and deer mangling their gardens, you have.... Peafowl! :shock: But you are making plans for that, so that's good.

Do they provide any beneficial service (even though they are not native birds?). For example, people with large/rural/farm property around here often keep Guinea hens for tick control. ...and their main disadvantages are said to be their tendency to be loud/noisy and to dig a lot. Advantages are said to be their reliable alarm calls as guard animals.

You said they roost up in your trees? So collecting eggs is out of the question? (...are you allowed to do that?)

I would be upset but conflicted too.....

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TheWaterbug
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applestar wrote:Do they provide any beneficial service (even though they are not native birds?). For example, people with large/rural/farm property around here often keep Guinea hens for tick control. ...and their main disadvantages are said to be their tendency to be loud/noisy and to dig a lot. Advantages are said to be their reliable alarm calls as guard animals
Perhaps novelty value?

They're kinda neat, when they're not actively destroying things :roll:, because they're big and beautiful. And it's cute to watch the Moms and their chicks walking around in the summer time.

I do have a small collection of tail feathers. Someday I'll do something with them, but I haven't yet. Some people sell them, but around here everyone already has a few :).

The noise bothers some people tremendously, but everyone in my household has pretty much learned to ignore them.

The biggest downside outside of the garden is their poop. They make big piles!
You said they roost up in your trees? So collecting eggs is out of the question? (...are you allowed to do that?)

I would be upset but conflicted too.....

They roost in trees when they're not nesting. When they lay eggs they lay them in a depression on the ground (the "pea" in peafowl is for "pea-brained"). One of my neighbors had a peahen lay an egg right on her patio :roll:

The absolute lack of natural predators has probably bred additional stupidity into this population. Large dogs will chase them, but cats and medium/small dogs just back away.

They're not even afraid of cars.

I suppose I could probably find eggs in the springtime if I took the trouble to look. I may think about that next spring. Eat them? Addle them? Sell them?
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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Kisal
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Eat 'em and compost the shells. :)

The poop would be an excellent addition to your compost pile, too. Maybe spread grass clippings under their roosts, so you can just rake it all up once a week and toss it on the compost pile?

Peafowl eat a lot of insects, so are helpful in that respect. But they do love leafy greens, and I have a suspicion they wouldn't turn away from a nice ripe tomato, pepper, or berries, either. ;)
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TheWaterbug
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Kisal wrote:Peafowl eat a lot of insects, so are helpful in that respect. But they do love leafy greens, and I have a suspicion they wouldn't turn away from a nice ripe tomato, pepper, or berries, either. ;)
Actually yes, they do eat a lot of bugs, and that has caused problems, too.

My squashes and melons seem to accumulate a lot of bugs right at the base of the vines, and the peafowls' endless pecking and digging actually damages the plants. They're not trying to eat the vines, but they destroyed a few anyway. I lost two watermelon vines and a cantaloupe vine that way. Next year I'll have to leave the base of the plant covered with something.

They savaged my tomatoes until I got the netting up.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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TheWaterbug
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Re: More peafowl carnage :(

TheWaterbug wrote:[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/RuinsOfArugula_web.jpg[/img]

I'm going to put the row cover back on and hope they're still alive underneath.
Clearly, peafowl can't read or don't take the time to. [url=https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBoQtwIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DKOGMEDaeiA0&ei=Kfh8TsL8G4-htwejzdxs&usg=AFQjCNF_9QqNeHdQtVXM-G39sq4wRYWoTA]It says right here[/url], in big bold letters, "Please make sure, every time, to harvest NO MORE THAN 1/4 of the plant at a time!"

The good news is that some new leaves are coming up. My wife may get her arugula salad yet!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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PunkRotten
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I seen one of these birds living in a lot/field over my back wall. I was not sure if it was feral or it belonged to someone. I used to hear it making noise all the time even at night. It had this funny call it would make, but I didn't care got kind of used to it. But now I don't hear or see it anymore.


Since I am in LA county too I wonder if it is one of those Feral birds.

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soil
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arugula is strong stuff, i bet it comes back with the fury. i cut mine back completely a few times a season and it doesn't even phase it.
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TheWaterbug
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soil wrote:arugula is strong stuff, i bet it comes back with the fury.
It's baaaaacck!!

I don't know if it's furious, but it's growing again. I'll try to post pictures of it tomorrow.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

DeborahL
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Great article-I was wondering why peacocks too.
By the way, is that you in the profile picture?
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ccar2000
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Hey Waterbug, How about a solar power fence or electric wires placed above your garden beds. With a switch at the entrance? Depending on your garden size it may not be too big of an expense. Folks use them for bears in their apiaries, right? I do not know if Peafowl legs and feet are conductive or not?
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TheWaterbug
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TheWaterbug wrote:They roost in trees when they're not nesting. When they lay eggs they lay them in a depression on the ground (the "pea" in peafowl is for "pea-brained"). One of my neighbors had a peahen lay an egg right on her patio :roll: . . . . I suppose I could probably find eggs in the springtime if I took the trouble to look. I may think about that next spring. Eat them? Addle them? Sell them?
So I was out in the garden the other day, and I saw this:

[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/HatchedOrEaten.jpg[/img]

Does this look like it hatched? Or does it look like a predator ate it? :twisted:

I'm conflicted!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

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Kisal
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The predators I'm most familiar with ... raccoons, foxes, opossums, cats and dogs ... tend to eat the entire egg, shell and all. I don't know about skunks and such, or snakes and lizards. I thought snakes swallowed the egg whole, including the shell, though. Maybe smaller ones don't?
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sciencegal
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Ravens eat eggs and leave the shells. My chickens are free range so I have a great deal of trouble with ravens going right in the chicken coop and eating all the eggs. I read somewhere that if you put old golf balls in the nest the ravens will stop stealing the eggs after they try to open a golf ball or two. So, I tried that one year. I was given about a dozen golf balls which I put in the nests over the course of a week or so. They all disappeared, but the egg eating continued. A year or so later a man who lives about 5 miles away (as the crow flies) told me that he could not figure out why he had all of these golf balls laying around under a tree. :roll:

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jal_ut
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I do have a small collection of tail feathers.
At one point I thought you said they roosted in your trees?

If that is the case, go out at night and grab one by the tail feathers and hold on tight. You will end up with the whole tail in your hands. Those feathers pull our easily.

If you want to catch the bird, you have to grab it by the legs.

Those things are real pests. You should grumble to your city admin. until they do something about them. At least declare them a pest and open for assault. People should not have to put up with the carnage. IMO

Peacocks belong in zoos. Behind a tight fence.
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