Rjohnson84
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How to get rid of bugs in vegetable garden?

I am a first year gardener and need some help on how to keep the bugs from eating my crops! I am not sure if it's best to get a spray from lowes or home depot or is there something natural I can use?

I am currently growing:
Tomatoes - all in pots
Cucumbers
String beans
Sugar snap peas
Green peppers
Watermelon
Basil, parsley and chives

Not sure if any of this helps but I appreciate any advice given! :)

Thank you! I look forward to any replys! :)

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Kisal
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You don't really want to get rid of all the "bugs" in your garden. Some of them are actually helpers, doing jobs such as pollination. Without those insects, you wouldn't get any crops at all.

In addition, some insects are only susceptible to certain insecticides, so using a kind that doesn't affect them won't do any good, but may do harm to helpful insects.

Before you treat your plants for any kind of insects, it's best to identify exactly what insects are causing problems. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Rjohnson84
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Hmmm ok well that's good information to know. Wish I knew which bugs. Were eating the crops! :)

Rjohnson84
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Well it seems to me that one of my large watermelons may have some holes in it so I assumed something got to it and some of the leaves of my cucumbers have holes in them and seem to be wilting. Some of the leaves on my string beans too so I am not sure!

Thank you for the great info, I can understand that bees and butterflies being good for the crops, I do not like spiders but if I see them in the garden, I leave them be.

Rjohnson84
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Well it seems to me that one of my large watermelons may have some holes in it so I assumed something got to it and some of the leaves of my cucumbers have holes in them and seem to be wilting. Some of the leaves on my string beans too so I am not sure!

Thank you for the great info, I can understand that bees and butterflies being good for the crops, I do not like spiders but if I see them in the garden, I leave them be.

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soil
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its going to sound funny, but the answer is to invite more bugs. the good kind though, the ones that eat the bad bugs. they also like flowers so plant a lot of flowers and you will bring the good guys.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

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Halfway
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I use BT to control the worms and that is about it. It seems the robins and sparrows are doing a great job this year patrolling the crop!!
Zone 4a.

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Fig3825
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Check for cucumber beetles and flea beetles. Cucumber beetles will be black and yellow striped bugs about 1/4" long and slightly wider and 1/8". They like to hang out in the late blossoms. They will cause the leaves to be stringy and holey and the leaves will eventually wilt and die.

Flea beetles are about the side of the "O" where is says "ONE CENT" on a penny. They are black and hop around when you disturb them. They make the leaves look like you hit them with a tiny shotgun.

nathan125
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I use neem oil generally. Sometimes i use Sevin, thats only if i need to nuke something.

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rainbowgardener
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If I need to use anything, garlic-pepper spray. But I'm also in the camp that not all bugs are bad and even a few bad bugs can be tolerated. If you have a major infestation that is going to wipe out your crop, then you need to do something about it. A few holes in leaves here and there isn't a problem and the predator insects won't come unless there is prey for them.

Put a lot of bird feeders (and a bird bath, and bird houses) in your garden. Birds are your best defense!
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

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applestar
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If you post pictures of the affected plants and close up of the damages, we (as in the forum members) can very often help identify the culprit.

Sometimes, you can catch the pests in the act (take pics!) Some of them feed at night -- very frequenty, chewed up leaves are caused by slugs and snails and you need to go out at dusk or at night with a flashlight.

Indicate where you live because that will also help with the ID. :wink:

You'll find instructions for posting photos here:
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=23

john gault
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Halfway wrote:I use BT to control the worms and that is about it. It seems the robins and sparrows are doing a great job this year patrolling the crop!!
What is "BT"?

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applestar
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Sorry this is OT but I just came across this photo and couldn't resist.
-- Apparently, they have one of these in Australia:
[img]https://www.trade-nations.com/sites/default/files/aussie3.jpg[/img] :shock:

--

BT -- properly spelled Bt (abbrev. for Bacillus thuringiensis) is cultivated bacteria that are sold as insecticide which targets specific organisms. Different strains have been identified to target Lepidoptera (moths and butterfly) larvae, Mosquito/gnat larvae, and soil dwelling beetle larvae (such as Japanese beetles and Junebugs), for example.

OK that was from memory. Here's the first link I found on the subject:
https://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05556.html

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Tilde
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applestar wrote:Sorry this is OT but I just came across this photo and couldn't resist.
-- Apparently, they have one of these in Australia:
[img]https://www.trade-nations.com/sites/default/files/aussie3.jpg[/img] :shock:
Someone's having fun with photoshop. That or someone has one HUGE wrist one SKINNY one, and a few weird fingers ...
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

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!potatoes!
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a bacterium that just targets Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacillus_thuringiensis

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