User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

how is the flavor of the banana squash? is it mild like a blue hubbard? or is it very squashy flavored like a butternut or acorn?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
Fig3825
Senior Member
Posts: 286
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:40 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

I was finally able to get home before dark and snap a couple pics of my squash. I got a late start due to some bad decisions, but that's been covered elsewhere in these forums... :)

Butternuts in the closest row and summer crookneck on the second row.
[img]https://www.jtnewton.com/Images/Garden/07192011007.jpg[/img]

And while I'm here, my watermelons have just started to take off. About 3"-5" growth per day. I should put the timelapse camera on these guys...

[img]https://www.jtnewton.com/Images/Garden/07192011006.jpg[/img]

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

My butternuts are going crazy with several fruit on them. Pumpkins, watermelon, cantaloupe are starting to take off I planted late in hopes of a harvest before fall and after the SVB leave the area. :evil:

I can't seem to get cucumbers to grow this year for some reason.

mmmfloorpie
Senior Member
Posts: 107
Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:21 am
Location: Ontario Canada

Here's my spaghetti squash:

[img]https://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm113/drew4allyou/0719111855-01.jpg[/img]

My biggest fruit:

[img]https://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm113/drew4allyou/0719111855-00.jpg[/img]

I hope they really take off producing fruit now!

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

TheWaterbug wrote:^^
Can you two please get your melons to talk to my melons?

They need some inspiration.
One of my watermelons may have gotten the message, because it's beginning to send out a vine:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/WatermelonVining071911_web.jpg[/img]

It's not very long yet, but at least it's vining.

It's still got a way to go to catch up to the pumpkins, though. They're starting to put out female flowers:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/FirstPumpkinFemale071911_web.jpg[/img]
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7480
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

how is the flavor of the banana squash? is it mild like a blue hubbard? or is it very squashy flavored like a butternut or acorn?
It has been a while since I grew banana squash. It seems that it is a mild flavored squash. Bright yellow flesh. The variety can sometimes get huge. You cut one and pass it around to the neighbors.

[url=https://www.specialtyproduce.com/produce/Banana_Squash_4587.php]Click[/url]
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

TheWaterbug wrote: One of my watermelons may have gotten the message, because it's beginning to send out a vine:
Way to go, Waterbug! Now it should go really quickly. My first one now has an 18" vine and its first tiny male flower bud. The others have all began vining. Yesterday, I watered them deeply for the first time, leaving a hose on trickle all day long. If I can get a pollinated female flower by the end of July, I will be very, very happy 8)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

stella1751 wrote:
TheWaterbug wrote: One of my watermelons may have gotten the message, because it's beginning to send out a vine:
Way to go, Waterbug!
Thank you, although I must say I can't take all the credit for it. My teammates did a great job getting me the hose when I was open, and I was able to execute and put the seed in the hole.

We did a lot of work in the off-season, and we're just glad to see it pay off. The SVBs are always a tough competitor, but my teammates and I gave 110% like we always do, and I'm grateful that we were able to come away with a victory. Like my old coach used to say, there's no "I" in "vegetable."
Now it should go really quickly. My first one now has an 18" vine and its first tiny male flower bud. The others have all began vining. Yesterday, I watered them deeply for the first time, leaving a hose on trickle all day long. If I can get a pollinated female flower by the end of July, I will be very, very happy 8)
I hand-pollinated my first female pumpkin blossom this morning. It was very satisfying. For both of us. Seriously. Why would she lie to me?
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

TheWaterbug wrote:
stella1751 wrote:
TheWaterbug wrote: One of my watermelons may have gotten the message, because it's beginning to send out a vine:
Way to go, Waterbug!
Thank you, although I must say I can't take all the credit for it. My teammates did a great job getting me the hose when I was open, and I was able to execute and put the seed in the hole.

We did a lot of work in the off-season, and we're just glad to see it pay off. The SVBs are always a tough competitor, but my teammates and I gave 110% like we always do, and I'm grateful that we were able to come away with a victory. Like my old coach used to say, there's no "I" in "vegetable."
Now it should go really quickly. My first one now has an 18" vine and its first tiny male flower bud. The others have all began vining. Yesterday, I watered them deeply for the first time, leaving a hose on trickle all day long. If I can get a pollinated female flower by the end of July, I will be very, very happy 8)
I hand-pollinated my first female pumpkin blossom this morning. It was very satisfying. For both of us. Seriously. Why would she lie to me?
This is too funny. Not being a die-hard sports fan, it took me a while to figure out what in the Hades you were talking about when you credited your teammates for getting you "the hose when I was open." Once I got it, I laughed out loud. Good stuff! I can visualize you raising your arm way above your head, slamming that seed into the hole, and doing a TD dance in the side zone. Me, I bunted my seeds in :lol:
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Me=Happy!

I went out and looked at my plant today... despite loosing the first set of leaves to powdery mildew (oops!) i have a female flower coming out on my vine! And, to make it even better, I came out today and saw some male flowers open... with a bee on one of them flowers, so I don't have to freak out about having bees down there or not, thank goodness!

Squash wise, my in grounds didn't do as well as my in-containers, so I decided to pull them yesterday. It really is a matter of i got 1 zucchini from each in ground plant (I had 3) and my one container zucchini has given me about 15! I'll just leave the big one to do it's thing, and pulled the others to make room for some fall crops, even though I'm most likely running late!

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

stella1751 wrote:I am having an extremely odd pumpkin year, partly because of adverse weather and partly because I did something I think will prove to have been seriously stupid. Just when the pumpkins had really spread out, developing some thick vines and putting on flowers, we had a really bad hail storm. The thick vines got pummeled pretty good and now have deep tan indentations all along them. I think this explains why so many female flowers are aborting before they even bloom. The vines are maybe too damaged to sustain life.

The stupid thing seemed like a brainstorm at the time. I had four tomato seedlings, three pumpkin seedlings, and one 8' x 4' raised bed. It seemed only logical to put the pumpkins in the middle of the bed and two tomatoes at each end. Now, however, the hail-damaged pumpkins are growing like mad, putting out vine after vine and enormous leaf after enormous leaf (everything but pumpkins) while the broken-stemmed, now-bushy tomatoes, which got their tops pounded by the hail, have barely managed to creep above the second level on their cages. There are tomatoes on the plants, but they are so low, they are now obscured by pumpkin leaves.

To make things worse, I swear those pumpkins are shooting out a foot of vine overnight. I try to direct the vines around the tomato cages, but every now and again, a vine rockets through a tomato cage in 24 hours. If worse comes to worse and the pumpkins start to seriously affect my tomato harvest, I'm going to have to pull those puppies. They are sugar pies, but I'm not handy enough to trellis 'em.

Oh well. Live and learn. Had it not been for the hail, my plan might have worked :evil:
Update: I tore out the oldest of the pumpkins last night, the one that had the badly damaged vines. It just kept putting out leaves and vines and leaves and vines and no viable fruit. Ultimately, it got into a sun competition with the two broken-stemmed semi-determinate tomatoes at one end, shooting big fat leaves high above the tomato plants and blocking their sun.

Separating it from the younger pumpkins was easier than I thought. Wherever I saw a dark green vine with tan dents in it, I snipped and pulled, revealing two rather pathetic, sun-starved pumpkin plants beneath it. I really thought I had lost one of these in the hail storm; they were both so young then, just seedlings, that I am surprised they survived.

Now I am guiding their vines over the side of the raised bed. I don't really have a yard, not with all the rocks on top of my non-garden areas, so if they are truly determined to produce, they can do it someplace else.

Never again. Pumpkins, tomatoes, and hail do not mix :shock:
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

I have bees! They didn't all go away! Here's one visiting a male pumpkin flower:

[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/LittlePollinator_web.jpg[/img]

It's hard to tell from this angle, but he's completely covered with pollen.

[url=https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/LittlePollinator.jpg]Full resolution, here.[/url]
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

Beansie_time
Full Member
Posts: 34
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011 6:30 pm
Location: Southern NH

Sorry if this is too pic heavy, if it is let me know and I'll edit. Still new to the etiquette on this board.

I think I am finally winning the battle with my squash bugs. I have been angrily and mercilessly killing them and their eggs like a Spartan with a toothache.

Here are the Watermelons and Cantaloupes which have grown into a tangled mess but are covered with flowers and tiny fruits:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0381.jpg[/img]

Here are the volunteer pumpkins that were under my deck. I transplanted them to five gallon buckets. They look like they're doing OK:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0382.jpg[/img]

Here's the biggest so far of the Big Max Pumpkins:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0384.jpg[/img]

Here are some spaghetti squash that have spilled into the grass:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0385.jpg[/img]

Another squash about the size of a nerf football:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0386.jpg[/img]

A Red Kuri squash a little bigger than a softball:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0388.jpg[/img]

Here is the squash bed from one angle:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0389.jpg[/img]

and another angle:
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0383.jpg[/img]
That mess contains 2 each big max pumpkins, acorn squash, delicata squash, and spaghetti squash, 1 each red Kuri, Butternut, and Buttercup squash, 4 zucchini, and 1 yellow patty pan. There is also a row of sunflowers separating the summer and winter varieties.

And here is a patty pan squash that is growing upwards instead of vining or spreading out. Is this normal for patty pans? I've never grown them before?
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0390.jpg[/img]
A=A

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

Beansie_time wrote:And here is a patty pan squash that is growing upwards instead of vining or spreading out. Is this normal for patty pans? I've never grown them before?
[img]https://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg40/beansie_time/IMAG0390.jpg[/img]
I grew patty pans in 2009. I had read that they were an excellent container squash so expected a small, manageable squash. They went crazy, roughly 5 feet tall. I trellised mine in tomato cages, intending for them to grow up, not out. However, I gave up forcing them into the cage after a while.

They grow up, but the leaves start to lie down when they get too heavy. The fruit emerges from the center of the plant and, yes, grows upward at an angle. I had many that were two or three feet above the ground. Following is a picture of one of my beds of patty pans from back then.

[img]https://i801.photobucket.com/albums/yy292/mitbah/squash_1-1.jpg[/img]

I can't remember how many plants I had in there; I think there were seven of 'em. This was the first time in years that I had tried squash. After these guys, I decided I wouldn't grow squash again. (I don't classify pumpkins as a squash, but I suppose I should.)

These patty pans were waterhogs in a moderate summer and constantly kept me running for the hose. Picking them was a pain because I had to fight to find walking room around this bed, squeezing right up next to a wasp nest many a time. I did wind up taking several totes to the local church, which felt good, but they were just ridiculous in terms of growth and production. Never again :x
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7480
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Woo Hoo! finally got a zucchini. The crooknecks are not far behind.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

Beansie_time wrote:Sorry if this is too pic heavy
Heavens, no! I enjoy a little garden p0rn at the end of a really rough week.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Heavens, no! I enjoy a little garden p0rn at the end of a really rough week.
I thought this was
Thank you, although I must say I can't take all the credit for it. My teammates did a great job getting me the hose when I was open, and I was able to execute and put the seed in the hole.
and this
I hand-pollinated my first female pumpkin blossom this morning. It was very satisfying. For both of us. Seriously. Why would she lie to me?
:shock: :lol:
Eric

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27977
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

After nearly a week of heatwave in the 90's (102 today) and nights in the 80's, I found a whole big mess of hatched squash bug juvies and eggs! :evil:

The juvies have soft bloated ghostly white bodies with black legs and are easily squished if annoyingly capable of hiding on the OTHER IDE -- of leaf, stem, whatever. The eggs were firmly stuck onto the underside of the leaves, hugging the mid vein and annoyingly difficult to get off near the veins.

It was 85°F in the shade at 7:30 this morning. If I hadn't been watering the area with overhead oscillating sprinkler, I don't think I could have stood the heat in the sun nor the patience to persevere with the task. As it was, I was completely soaked by the time I called it quits. :lol: Also found 3 pairs of mating adults that no doubt are responsible. Hendi_Alex ws right in that they are all pretty docile and easy to capture and dispose of when the foliage is being watered. :twisted:

These bugs with elongated tan bodies and triangular black marking is new to my garden. I've had the Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs bothering the cucurbits but not these. No doubt the extended heatwave and drought is creating the kind of conditions that appeal to them. :x

User avatar
soil
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1855
Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:40 am
Location: N. California

the squash bugs always multiply a lot about now. but in a few weeks so will the lizards and the bugs will be gone in no time.

on a good note my squash is setting fruit well. some already have 5-6 fruits set.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

bogydave
Senior Member
Posts: 197
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 3:11 am
Location: Alaska

Zucs doing well, both types.
Lots of pumpkins forming, 2 are about 8", several smaller.
[img]https://i274.photobucket.com/albums/jj269/bogydave/broc7-23-11.jpg[/img]

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

TheWaterbug wrote:I hand-pollinated my first female pumpkin blossom this morning. It was very satisfying. For both of us. Seriously. Why would she lie to me?
It looks like it took:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/FirstPumpkin072311_web.jpg[/img]
She's about the size of a goose egg or passion fruit right now. Mmmm. Passion fruit.

Anyway, back on topic. We're rapidly vining now, and I've got female flowers popping up all over the patch. I'll post an updated panorama in my other thread, hopefully later today.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

TZ -OH6
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2097
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Mid Ohio

Some of my PA Neck squash are getting some size to them. Lots of funny shapes too. The plants are overflowing everthing around them. The leaves are huge. I'm a bit scared of them actually. They are in soil that is shaded half the day and is in a low spot and staying moist so they think they are some sort of tropical elephant ear Tarzan vine.

I saw some melons today and my trellised Walmart butternuts are puting out fruit.

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

my biggest pumpkin plant died today :( i still have no idea what killed it :?

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

SPierce wrote:my biggest pumpkin plant died today :( i still have no idea what killed it :?
:(

If you lived in CA I'd give you one of mine.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

TheWaterbug wrote:
SPierce wrote:my biggest pumpkin plant died today :( i still have no idea what killed it :?
:(

If you lived in CA I'd give you one of mine.
Aww, thanks! I put a few more seeds in the ground, but.... :/ I don't know what killed it. It's driving me nuts.

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

SPierce wrote:my biggest pumpkin plant died today :( i still have no idea what killed it :?
I am so sorry to hear this, SPierce. What a heartbreak. I suspect I am losing two tomato plants. Like you, I haven't a clue why. Later today, I will get a photo and post it in the tomato forum. Someone is bound to have seen this disease or whatever it is.

Today I had a female watermelon blossom! There were two male flowers, but I don't think they are mature yet. They aren't fully open. I took a chance, though, and squandered on of them on the female. Tomorrow, I will use the other one. I am desperate to get at least one mature watermelon this year!
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

stella1751 wrote:
SPierce wrote:my biggest pumpkin plant died today :( i still have no idea what killed it :?
I am so sorry to hear this, SPierce. What a heartbreak. I suspect I am losing two tomato plants. Like you, I haven't a clue why. Later today, I will get a photo and post it in the tomato forum. Someone is bound to have seen this disease or whatever it is.

Today I had a female watermelon blossom! There were two male flowers, but I don't think they are mature yet. They aren't fully open. I took a chance, though, and squandered on of them on the female. Tomorrow, I will use the other one. I am desperate to get at least one mature watermelon this year!
Oh, i hope you get a watermelon! :D Post a photo if you do!

Thanks- I'm just confused. I spent the last 2 weeks frantically researching to to figure out what it was... and nada! there's all sorts of diseases, but none of the pictures match what I see going on out back! Oh well, i guess if all else fails i'll try to put some more seeds in the ground and see what happens. These have already been in for 2 months, and it's kinda heartbreaking to watch them slowly die and not be able to do anything...

hockeymom519
Full Member
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:40 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, MD

We went out yesterday to take pictures and measure our giant pumpkin. My 4 year old nicked the surface of the pumpkin with the yard stick. Will the pumpkin be ok?

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

hockeymom519 wrote:We went out yesterday to take pictures and measure our giant pumpkin. My 4 year old nicked the surface of the pumpkin with the yard stick. Will the pumpkin be ok?
It should be fine. When I was studying pumpkins last year, I came across a site that said some people actually carve their names into pumpkins early in their development. As the pumpkin grows, the scar becomes more pronounced, and the mature pumpkin has a big old name in it :-)
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

hockeymom519
Full Member
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:40 pm
Location: Eastern Shore, MD

Thanks Stella. If we are lucky enough to get a few decent pumpkins, we may have to try carving his name into one while it grows. Right now we only have 2 growing.

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

stella1751 wrote:It should be fine. When I was studying pumpkins last year, I came across a site that said some people actually carve their names into pumpkins early in their development. As the pumpkin grows, the scar becomes more pronounced, and the mature pumpkin has a big old name in it :-)
Thanks for reminding me about this! My largest is presently the size of a grapefruit, which about the right size for my 7-yr-old to "write" his 4-letter name :)

BTW I have an image in my mind of you "studying pumpkins." It's weird!
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Well, in hopes of saving my other pumpkin plants (which, slowly, seems to be growing!) i gave it a little Alaskan Fish Fertilizer on it's leaves, and a little bit of plant-tone around by the stem. Guess i'll see what happens from here!

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

SPierce wrote:Well, in hopes of saving my other pumpkin plants (which, slowly, seems to be growing!) i gave it a little Alaskan Fish Fertilizer on it's leaves, and a little bit of plant-tone around by the stem. Guess i'll see what happens from here!
I can remember worrying about my pumpkins early last summer. They got off to a really slow start, and I wondered whether I would get any pumpkins at all before the first freeze. By the end of the summer, everyone was talking about planning their pumpkins around Halloween, and I had just harvested my last one and was getting ready to pull the plants. Duh.

Once they get going, they really produce fast. If your current pumpkins don't make it, maybe those seeds you planted will prove just the ticket for Halloween pumpkins!
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
cherishedtiger
Green Thumb
Posts: 339
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:10 pm
Location: Sacramento, California

Hmmm... maybe I planted mine too early? I have one thats about the size of a bowling ball right now, still green, just staring to yellow. While at the same time I have a bunch of oh... smaller than golf ball size growing. Wonder if I am going to be with pumpkins before Halloween or if they will be ok.

[img]https://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k82/cherishedtiger/DSCN0712.jpg[/img]

This was taken on July 10th, so if you can imagine the plant has grown quite a bit in just a few days.

How long do pumpkins store? :oops:
Because all things need to be cherished
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

cherishedtiger wrote:Hmmm... maybe I planted mine too early? I have one thats about the size of a bowling ball right now, still green, just staring to yellow. While at the same time I have a bunch of oh... smaller than golf ball size growing. Wonder if I am going to be with pumpkins before Halloween or if they will be ok.

[img]https://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k82/cherishedtiger/DSCN0712.jpg[/img]

This was taken on July 10th, so if you can imagine the plant has grown quite a bit in just a few days.

How long do pumpkins store? :oops:
I had a few that lasted me until Feburary the next year- don't worry :D Not all of them do that, but some will.

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

SPierce wrote:
cherishedtiger wrote: How long do pumpkins store? :oops:
I had a few that lasted me until Feburary the next year- don't worry :D Not all of them do that, but some will.
Were these on the vine? Or picked?

I know that picked pumpkins last forever, but I'd like to leave mine on the vine for a month or so past maturity. I planted May 7, but I want to have them picked on October 23rd at our 2nd annual Pick and Paint Pumpkin Patch Party.
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
TheWaterbug
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1068
Joined: Mon May 02, 2011 9:15 pm
Location: Los Angeles

SPierce wrote:Aww, thanks! I put a few more seeds in the ground, but.... :/ I don't know what killed it. It's driving me nuts.
We're just about 90 days from Halloween, and if you're planting 90-100 day varieties, it's going to be close.

Does your local nursery have pumpkin plants that might already be 2-3 weeks old?
Sunset 23/USDA 11a, Elev. 783', Frost free since 8,000 BC. Plagued by squirrels, gophers, and peafowl, but coming to terms with it!

User avatar
SPierce
Greener Thumb
Posts: 732
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:57 pm
Location: Massachusetts

TheWaterbug wrote:
SPierce wrote:Aww, thanks! I put a few more seeds in the ground, but.... :/ I don't know what killed it. It's driving me nuts.
We're just about 90 days from Halloween, and if you're planting 90-100 day varieties, it's going to be close.

Does your local nursery have pumpkin plants that might already be 2-3 weeks old?
\
I'm actually not too worried... i still have one pumpkin plant left; if I get one, i get one. Otherwise, i'll try again next year! I did plant some pumpkins from a local nusery last year, but i had horrible luck with the plants doing all of NOTHING then dying off. I prefer to start from seed.

User avatar
stella1751
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1494
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:40 pm
Location: Wyoming

cherishedtiger wrote:Hmmm... maybe I planted mine too early? I have one thats about the size of a bowling ball right now, still green, just staring to yellow. While at the same time I have a bunch of oh... smaller than golf ball size growing. Wonder if I am going to be with pumpkins before Halloween or if they will be ok.

[img]https://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k82/cherishedtiger/DSCN0712.jpg[/img]

This was taken on July 10th, so if you can imagine the plant has grown quite a bit in just a few days.

How long do pumpkins store? :oops:
That's a beautiful pumpkin plant, Cherished Tiger! Last year I picked mine in late August and early September. I gave two away, and the recipients told me they had saved them for Halloween. There's a trick, too, for making them last longer. You wipe down the outside with a bleach dilute and store them someplace cool. I don't think either person did that with the ones I gave them, so it might not be necessary.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

User avatar
cherishedtiger
Green Thumb
Posts: 339
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:10 pm
Location: Sacramento, California

Thanks!! Its going crazy out there!! Every time I go out I am finding more and more baby pumpkins that seem to grow up over night!!!
Knowing they will last a nice long while I am not so worried anymore. I cant wait to get full grown ones though! Pumpkin pie, pumpkin breads, jack-o-lanterns.... I love fall and it can never seem to come quick enough!
Because all things need to be cherished
*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*
USDA zone 8A (guess it changed... not sure why I was a 9!)

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”