User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

should I give my onions chicken manure?

is it ok for onions?

what about potatoes? ok for them?

Is there anything it isn't OK for?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

OK, thank you! OK... so not good for root crops.

It is ok for everything else then as long as it is well aged. I took it from my chickens run area as it looked just like dirt. but it was piled up inches high. I believe 95% of it is completed composted... just a teeny bit mixed in is not.
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

what types of things are high in potash?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

It is my belief that onions are NOT a root crop.

James come to my rescue here.

Onions like high nitrogen whereas potatoes do not as much.

Potatoes like a higher P, K and a lower N.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

so it would be fine for onions but not potatoes and not carrots. I DO need something for my carrots. they're scrawny and not really growing. what would you recommend?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

Nitrogen encourages a plant to produce more foliage. Phosphate and potassium encourages more root development. Because carrots are a root vegetable that grow below the surface of the soil, phosphate and potassium are more beneficial to carrot growth.
from
https://www.backyard-vegetable-gardening.com/watering-carrots.html

If you are ever wondering just google "fertilizing (insert veggie here)". I have a bad memory so I have to do that a lot. :lol:

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

Of course chicken manure can't hurt just make sure you add some P and K. Especially early on it would be beneficial to get the plants going.

Just remember leafy plants even corn, onions like lot's of N the fruiting veggies (tomatoes etc) need more P and K or else you will have a big leafy plant and little fruit.

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7480
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

Gix is right about the onions. The onion bulb is not a root. The bulb is made up of the base of the leaves. Each layer of the onion is a leaf and it has the top green part attached. Take an actively growing onion and slice it in half lengthwise and look closely at its construction.

OK, I will offer my opinion on chicken dung as fertilizer. Yes, chicken is one of the best fertilizers. As noted it is high in nitrogen.

It is also my experience that all crops benefit greatly from nitrogen fertilizer. Yes, even potatoes and other root crops.

I think it is best to compost manures before adding them to your garden if the plants are already growing. It is ok to put fresh manure directly on the garden in the fall and working it in. I just don't like to put fresh manures on when the plants are growing. There has been too much trouble with e-coli when this is done. And sometimes salmonella. Not that I have ever had a problem, but we hear of it on the news. Best to just avoid the problem since we have the option.

Here is a short quote from [url=https://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/salmonella_questions_&_answers/index.asp]a USDA page.[/url]

"A. Salmonella lives in the intestinal tract of humans and other animals, including birds. Salmonella is usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Salmonella present on raw meat and poultry could survive if the product is not cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature, as measured with a food thermometer. Salmonella can also cause foodborne illness (salmonellosis) through cross-contamination, e.g., when juices from raw meat or poultry come in contact with ready-to-eat foods, such as salads. "
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
jal_ut
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7480
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 3:20 am
Location: Northern Utah Zone 5

I also need to stress the point that not all soils are equal. Nitrogen seems to be the element most often lacking in my soil, but other soils may need P and K too. It is best to do a soil test to find out what you really need to add to your soil for best production. In any case I can say that adding some chicken manure to your plot won't hurt a thing. Please just compost it first along with some fresh grass clippings and leaves if you have any, or add it in the fall. It is fun to make a big pile of grass clippings, chicken manure and old leaves. Those kind of piles get hot quickly and the resulting compost is good stuff.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27960
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I like jal's recommendations and safety reminder. :wink:

Also, I have a vague recollection that chicken manure adds phosphates in addition to Nitrogen. This will have to be verified.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

thanks so much!

so, I was reading about potash and wood ashes. so, lets say I get some wood ashes and mix it with the chicken manure. would that be an acceptable fertilizer for the potatoes and carrots?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

User avatar
sheeshshe
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1254
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

Ok.. I'm not sure100% what my soil is lacking, but all I know is that I can't grow roots crops in it. not sure if it is because of the pH not being right or if it is lacking something in particular... but, I had some garden loam hauled in for some raised beds this spring,and those grew radishes just fine. while the ones I put in my regular soil didn't grow radishes. I've tried growing radishes for 6 years.
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”