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TheWaterbug
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:That's quite a jump in 4 days. Are you getting extra heat of the concrete wall?

Have you grown corn before? Are you concerned with the cross pollination?
I don't think I'm getting much heat from anything these days. It's just be lolling around in the high 60s and low 70s. Later this week it's supposed to break 80, so I'm hoping for a growth spurt. I think the wall might help once there's actually some heat to work with.

I've never grown corn before. I don't know whether I should worry about cross-pollination or not. They're both sweet corn, and after lunch I should know whether they're both SE varieties or not. I also planted them 2 weeks apart, but due to their varying maturity dates they might silk at the same time.

According to [url=https://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs//_h/h-223.pdf]this article[/url], super-sweet varieties need to be isolated from SE varieties, but "Isolating sugar enhanced from standard sweet corn varieties is not necessary for pollination."

It doesn't say anything about isolating one SE variety from a different SE variety. Hmmm.
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I'm also wonder, not only cross pollination, but lack of pollination. If the one row comes to maturity before the other you maybe in trouble. You may have to hand pollinate. Blocks of corn are better than long rows.

Wish you luck
Eric

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TheWaterbug
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DoubleDogFarm wrote:I'm also wonder, not only cross pollination, but lack of pollination. If the one row comes to maturity before the other you maybe in trouble. You may have to hand pollinate. Blocks of corn are better than long rows.
Yeah, I read about planting in blocks _after_ the corn had gone in. I do a lot of that :)

I don't mind hand-pollinating at all. I do it for my pumpkins, just to be sure. I'm a belt-and-suspenders kind of guy :D
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So it looks like the 2nd and 3rd rows were [url=https://www.stoverseed.com/P_vegetables_9.html]Bi-Licious[/url], which is a 75-80 day variety. Assuming the first stuff matures in 84 and this matures in 77, they're going to mature a week apart. I'm going to have a lot of corn between July 30 and August 6th!

I am thinking of a second crop, ideally one to mature for the Hallowe'en party on October 29th. Counting back 84 days puts me at August 6th, which is one week after the first set of SE corn is supposed to mature. So I hope I get to taste it and see if it's worth planting again :)
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I've been pollinating my corn because I'm trying to segregate different colors and have them separted by grouped hills. The plants are silking before releasing pollen and doing it very unevenly so I have one mature tassle for several silking hills. I accidentally found that if you take the top of the plant off and put it in water/flower vase you can shake out as much as 1/8 tsp of pollen first thing in the morning and more each hour after that for a while. That works for a couple of days...I've been taking a shotglass of pollen out to the plants and using a paintbrush tapping little clouds of pollen over top of the silks. I can't do that with all of the different colors so I take a paper plate out and tap pollen onto that and go around to the silks.

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TZ -OH6 wrote:I've been pollinating my corn because I'm trying to segregate different colors and have them separted by grouped hills.
You'll definitely have to post some pictures!
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Great tip, TZ! :D
My Buhl corn are 2-3' tall now. Evergreen are 4'.
Having short early tasseling issues with the Double Red Sweet.
:?

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TheWaterbug wrote:So it looks like the 2nd and 3rd rows were [url=https://www.stoverseed.com/P_vegetables_9.html]Bi-Licious[/url], which is a 75-80 day variety.
This is an SE variety, too, according to several sources. Although Stover doesn't mention it as such on their seed packet or on their website, which is weird.

Anyway, the Bi-Licious is tasseling!
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/BiLiciousTasseling.jpg[/img]
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/BiLiciousTasselingCloseup.jpg[/img]

So exciting!

The Delectable isn't tasseling yet.
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Re: Corn, *Blue Cornmeal*

TheWaterbug wrote:Here's my corn patch as of [June 24, 2011]:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn062411.jpg[/img]
and here it is on July 2nd:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn070211.jpg[/img]
On July 4th it was clearly taller than him. Now I'm out of town until the evening of the 9th, so I won't see it again until the 10th. I'm sure it'll be taller than me by then. Amazing what some heat and water will do!

I just hope the corn tastes good. If I get 2 ears per stalk I'll have something like 160 ears to eat or give away.

How long do SE varieties stay good on the stalk?
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I'm hoping to get in a second crop, so I bought two packets of Bodacious.

Public service message: if you google "delectable bilicious bodacious" not all the results are about sweet corn:)
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Public service message: if you google "delectable bilicious bodacious" not all the results are about sweet corn:)
YIKES! :?

Nice to see your corn is doing well. Keep the pictures and information coming.

Eric
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Corn, *Blue Cornmeal*

TheWaterbug wrote:and here it is on July 2nd:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn070211.jpg[/img]
8 days later, and it's way taller than he is:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn071011a.jpg[/img]

In fact, some of it's taller than me! (I'm 6' 1'')
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn071011b.jpg[/img]

and we have tassels:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Tassels071011.jpg[/img]

and silk:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Silk071011.jpg[/img]

I also have aphids on a few of the tassels, so I just picked up a canister of ladybugs. I'll put them on as soon as it cools down a bit.
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I planted blue native corn this year, 8 stalks of "Six Nations Blue, long eared variant". They were all doing well until about a week ago when something visited the garden and tore up the mulch. They didn't bother any plants except for the corn. Whatever it was, broke off about half the corn. It looks like they were just running through that area and ran over it. Some are still growing, even bent right over and have tassles. I don't quite know what to do with them. I stood a couple back up and braced them with bricks. The others appear to be ok.

Question: Do you pull off all the suckers? I have always done so, just wondering if it's necessary and what happens if I just leave it? What do farmers with huge fields of corn do about suckers?

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In a patch of ~75 stalks I have a few whose tassels are almost completely covered with aphids. Should I cut them? Neem them? Blast them with the hose? Leave them alone?

Will aphids spread from stalk to stalk?
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Runningtrails, Where did you get seed for the Six Nations Blue?
Here is a bit about its history--
https://www.archive.org/details/iroquoisusesofma00parkrich

Do not remove the tillers. They don't cause any harm and may help bulk up your kernels from the added photosynthesis.

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Re: Corn, *Blue Cornmeal*

TheWaterbug wrote:In fact, some of it's taller than me! (I'm 6' 1'') [this was July 10]
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn071011b.jpg[/img]
On July 14th it was way taller than me:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn07141_web.jpg[/img]
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TZ -OH6 wrote:Do not remove the tillers. They don't cause any harm and may help bulk up your kernels from the added photosynthesis.
Interestingly, I have ears on some of my tillers!
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/SilkAndEars071311_web.jpg[/img]

Actually, do I have too many ears? That stalk above has 4 ears--one on the tiller and 3 on the main stalk. I have many other stalks with 3 ears each.

I suppose the good news is these plants felt healthy enough to spawn so many ears. But will this mean smaller ears than if I had only 2/stalk?

They're spaced a foot apart in their rows, and the rows are 3 feet apart, so they have plenty of space. I also give them lots of water, and I fertilized about 10 days ago.

Last week I drove through Central California, and I saw large, mature fields of corn that were planted _very_ densely. It seemed like they were 6-8" apart in rows, and the rows looked about a 12-18" apart, so 3x-6x denser than my patch. I was zipping by at 80 mph, though, so I couldn't see how many ears they had. But they were dark green and lush, so they certainly looked healthy.
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So it looks like the corn has ~1-3 weeks left before it should be harvestable.

Should I fertilize again? Or just let it ride?

I last fertilized on July 4th, and lots of what I read says to fertilize corn every 2 weeks.
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I may be wrong, but I figure that the plant needs the fertilizer for the growth spurt just before it sets cobs, and if the plants are big an healthy it won't need extra to develop the kernels-cobs. Because they take top priority, plants are good at tranlocating nutrients from vegetative parts to flowers and seeds. Water and sun is more important to bulk up kernels.

IMO, If you are not selling to the fickle public there is no reason not to have a bunch of mutant cobs on a single plant. They all taste the same.

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Question: Do you pull off all the suckers?
Suckers = tillers, whatever you call them. Do not pull them. Let them grow as they will. You will find your corn patch will do better if they are left on. Tillers are leaves to make food for the plant. Why would you want to pull the leaves off the plant?

I fertilize my corn plot just before planting, and side dress again when the corn is about to tassel. I use a product called Urea that the local farm store gets in bulk for the farmers. It is 46% nitrogen. I don't put it on very heavy.
Last edited by jal_ut on Tue Aug 02, 2011 4:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Okey doke. It looks like I'm going to let them do their thing. I peeled back a husk one of my cobs today, just to see how they're doing, and it looks like I have pretty good "fill" on the top 3rd, at least (that's how far I peeled back), so pollination appears to have been mostly successful.

I have to resist the urge to check on it every single day :D
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Here's two of my corn "patches," the right one planted on June 1, the left one planted on June 10.

[img]https://i801.photobucket.com/albums/yy292/mitbah/Corn_3.jpg[/img]

These are Yukon Chief, a 3' tall heirloom variety developed by the University of Alaska in 1959. I was dissatisfied with the germination, but they are producing like mad. All of them have from two to four suckers, which are also beginning to produce, so I may get as many as ten cobs per plant :shock:

Question: I was looking them over carefully yesterday when I spotted an ugly black patch at the base of one leaf. Thinking it was some kind of a worm, I tried to extract it with a twig. It turned out to a mass of about a half dozen earwigs. Will they harm my corn?
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[img]https://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n27/jaroot13/Farming%20Photos/89ed8043.jpg[/img]

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TheWaterbug wrote:Last week I drove through Central California, and I saw large, mature fields of corn that were planted _very_ densely. It seemed like they were 6-8" apart in rows, and the rows looked about a 12-18" apart, so 3x-6x denser than my patch. I was zipping by at 80 mph, though, so I couldn't see how many ears they had. But they were dark green and lush, so they certainly looked healthy.
When I was studying corn planting online early this spring, I learned that spacing is dependent upon the plant's mature size. The author said to go by the seed packet's recommended spacing. My packet for my short (3') corn said 8" to 12", so I went with 8" on mine. Good thing I did, too, because germination was really lousy :x
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rootsy, now that's a corn patch!
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TheWaterbug wrote:I peeled back a husk one of my cobs today, just to see how they're doing, and it looks like I have pretty good "fill" on the top 3rd, at least (that's how far I peeled back), so pollination appears to have been mostly successful.

I have to resist the urge to check on it every single day :D
I am failing miserably at the resisting part, so I'm checking it every day :)

Here's my Delectable, on day 81 of an alleged 84 day maturity:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Delectable_Day81of84_web.jpg[/img]

It certainly doesn't look like it'll be ready in 3 days, but it does look well filled, and I don't see any bugs.

Here's my Bi-Licious on day 67 of 77:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Bi-Licious_Day67of77_web.jpg[/img]

That looks healthy, and less than 10 days from edible.

So my Delectable is behind schedule, perhaps by as much as a week, and my Bi-Licious looks right on, or perhaps a bit early.

Kinda makes for difficult planning, no?
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First harvest!!!

So here are the first 5 ears of Delectable, picked today (Day 86):
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/FirstCorn080111_web.jpg[/img]

Of the 5 I picked 1 was under-ripe and tasteless, but the other 4 were really good! I think they were still just a tad early, as they didn't have their full color, and they weren't as sweet as they could have been. But they had good corn flavor, and they were tender and juicy.

The kernels almost felt like bubbles popping in my mouth. I ate three ears :)
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[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/corn_2011.jpg[/img]
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For some reason It double posted.................
It looks like deleting a post is not an option?

I can edit a post.
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jal_ut, what's the spacing on your corn? Everyone else's seems to be way denser than mine.
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I have 10 or 12 plants there on the right. Can't remember which. Of the two rows, the one on the left was planted about 2 weeks before the one on the right.

[img]https://www.jtnewton.com/Images/Garden/07312011001.jpg[/img]

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Posted: 08 01 11 Post subject:
jal_ut, what's the spacing on your corn? Everyone else's seems to be way denser than mine.
I planted it with a drill. It drops a seed every 9.5 inches. Sometimes two seeds will drop. I just let it all grow. The rows are 30 inches apart. You can see some tassels in the back, that was planted earlier. My early planting didn't do well. Poor germination. I had 4 rows, and ended up transplanting the one row over to fill up the other 3. Then it was cold and wet and it didn't get as tall as usual. The later planting, which is the closest in the pic, came on much better and is looking really good now. It is just starting to send out tassels. There are three varieties. Bodacious, Incredible and Ambrosia. I am about 10 days out to harvest for the first batch. Can't wait.
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[img]https://donce.lofthouse.com/jamaica/planting/plant_5.jpg[/img]

Here is a picture of the drill. It is the Earthway Garden Seeder. I use it for corn, beets, carrots, beans, and peas.
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Looks fancy! I have a small patch, so I just use my finger :)

I just planted another patch of Bodacious every 12" on 2' rows, so we'll see how it works out.
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We picked another 9 ears today. We only have about 130 left :)

I did a 360 panorama from approximately my kid's eye height. [url=https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/InTheCorn080211.mov]So this is what it looks like in my corn patch,[/url] from my son's point of view.
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With good fertility you can crowd a bit more in there. That means a lot of N and plenty of water and ZERO weed pressure. I had a couple of lbs of seed left over so I filled the Cyclo drum and stuck it in the ground the other day. Turned the population up to 30K on 38" rows... I generally shoot for a 20K population after germination loss. We'll see how it comes out and how it does for shading for weed control as well as competition. I have a lot of trouble with grass in row that I cannot cover simply with cultivation. Not quite sure it'll make maturity before we have a good hard frost in October...

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^^
Can I assume that "20K" means 20,000 plants/acre ~= just over 2 sf/plant?

I'm going to be at ~2 sf/plant on this new patch. I'll have drip watering, so they'll get plenty of it, and I think I can keep the weeds away. My first patch had almost no weeds after my first ~2 weeks of going through it with a stirrup hoe.

I didn't fertilize my first patch much. I did it once at about 24" height, and then again at about 48", just before it started tasseling.

I keep reading that you're supposed to do it every two weeks after emergence.
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yes that is plants (seeds) / acre. Divide final stand # desired by the germination. If the seed has an 85 % germination divide say 20,000 / 0.85 and you come up with just shy of 23,600 seed needing to be put in the ground. It is better to plant light (with a planter) than heavy, especially on LARGE areas because hand thinning is just out of the question. On a garden scale, not too difficult. You can put it in at higher population if you are irrigated. 25 - 30K. Commercial dent corn is in excess of 40K now on standard rows on irrigated ground.. Some twin row setups are pushing 45K / acre.

I generally incorporate 200 lbs / acre 46-0-0 pre-plant (equal to 96 units of N), put down a couple hundred pounds of 11-52-0 (another 22 units of N) off the planter, banded 2 x 2 next to the seed furrow. I'll come back and put 28% liquid N as the balance on one time during a cultivation pass when the corn is about 12 inches or growing above ground rather than beneath. Adds up to about 150 lbs N / acre total.

Means nothing if the weeds, especially grasses, overtake it and choke off the H2O, sunlight and nutrients.

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TheWaterbug wrote:First harvest!!!

So here are the first 5 ears of Delectable, picked today (Day 86)
Corn Season 1 is over at TheWaterbug Farm :) :( :) :(

We had 23 people for dinner last night on a fine Tuesday night (corn waits for no man!), of which 12 were kids between 5 and 12 years old.

It's amazing how much carnage a dozen kids can inflict on a corn patch!

They picked about 75 ears, of which we ate about 50, and the guests took the rest home:
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/3552590/Corn-u-Copia_080911_web.jpg[/img]

It was Day 95 (of 84) for the Delectable and Day 81 of 77 for the Bi-Licious. It was nearly all very, very good, except for a few ears that were a bit starchy. I'm going to suspect those were Delectable, although I can't be 100% sure. But it was all peaking, for sure, and there weren't that many days left in it (and I don't have room in the freezer/fridge) so I picked the last 18 large ears this morning and took them into the office.

It's a little bittersweet for me to see all the stalks bereft of corn, trampled into the ground, and torn apart, but I have terrific images of little kids with arms full of corn and big wide-eyed smiles. I have to keep reminding myself that that's why I do this!

There are a ~2 dozen "runt" ears on the stalks, still, but I don't know if those are going to grow any bigger. I'll just let them sit and see what they do.

Of course [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=38488]Corn Season 2[/url] is just [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=38806]beginning[/url]!
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Now that looks delicious.
Wish we could grow corn here. Tried it a few times, just not warm enough.
Great looking crop,
I can almost taste it!! ::: jealousy :)

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