mooseantlers
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Peat plant pots

At least I think they are peat.

I'm referring to those 'pots' that we get up here in the Northeast with all types of veggie plants. You're instructed to 'remove the plastic band' & simply plant the entire pot.

That's what I did last year & we had a horrible 'crop' (what little we had). We attributed it to an over-abundance of rain.

This year, I noticed something when turning the soil for replanting this year. Almost all of those 'pots' are intact. Wouldn't it stand to reason that they held back the root growth? Should these 'pots' be slit before planting?

Thanks!

johnny123
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I use alot of peat pots and never had them last a year in soil.
Usually mine are falling apart before it's time to plant.
When I do plant I just wet them good and lightly remove the bottom and I have never had a problem with plants not doing well.
If you keep the soil moist in them the roots start to grow right through them before planting time.
Most of the time they do too well and I have to give away some of the extra.
If a disease doesn't kill them and a bug doesn't eat them there may be something left for you.
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SPierce
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I've learned that the best thing to do, is to completely remove the entire pot before planting. Whether or not they actually biodegrade, they can hold back root growth and hold any chemicals (fertilizer, etc) too long around the roots of the plant.

Remove the peat pots, so you don't have to deal with them later on! The plants will love you for it, anyway :)

johnny123
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I wouldn't worry too much about the roots in a 4" peat pot.
I have bought tomatoes from growers in plastic six pack trays and the plants always grew great and the roots were in 3 time smaller areas in those trays.

Just wet the pot good before planting and the bottom will probably fall of in your hand.
If a disease doesn't kill them and a bug doesn't eat them there may be something left for you.
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rainbowgardener
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In my experience, like SPierce, I think it is best to entirely get rid of the peat pot. I throw them in my compost pile and they last a long time there, too.

They do keep the roots constrained which eventually chokes out the plant. It's like trying to grow a full sized tomato (or whatever) plant in a 3" pot. Actually it's worse than that, because if conditions are wet, it holds the moisture in too much and if conditions are dry, the peat wicks moisture away from your plant. They are terrible!
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jal_ut
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I too vote for removing the pot. They will restrain the roots.
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gixxerific
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Definitely remove at least the bottom if not the entire pot which is what I do. Than throw the pot on the ground or the compost.

They will NOT degrade so fast like they say they will. I too have found peat pots in tact the next year.

mooseantlers
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Thank you!

I removed most of the peat pods from the stuff I just planted. Hope I wasn't too rough on the roots (Roma tomatoes).

Thanks for all the info!!!

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