P_Synthesis
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Roofing Lead

Hi everyone and thanks for reading,

I've been doing some veggies in containers this year for the first time and it's gone very well, but I was thinking I'd like to do more. I have a space of flat roof I could easily access, and I'd like to put spme pots there.

My question (which may sound weird) is, should I worry about the roofing lead that's there, considering I'm going to be eating the results? :) And how much should I worry? Does anyone know?

Eg., if I have a flat grow bag with holes in the bottom directly on top of the lead, are the strawberries in that bag going to be completely stuffed with neurotoxins? Or -- if I have a large pot with a saucer underneath it, will this be fine? And -- could I coat that lead with something to make it non-toxic?

Sorry if these sound like quite obvious questions, but I'm rather new at all this and it's something I'd never even considered.

Thanks for your help,

Jason

gumbo2176
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I'm not sure I follow you. I've done a bit of roofing in my lifetime and I've never seen a lead roof. Slate, asphalt, asbestos, mop downs, galvanized tin and powdercoated metal are the norms around my area depending on the age of the building.


That said, my biggest concern would be more about the heat generated on a flat roof and how it will affect the plants. I know my hanging plants on my back porch need watering daily and sometimes twice a day with the heat of our summers because they dry out so quickly and my porch only gets about 7 hrs. of full sun from dawn till around 1 p.m.

TZ -OH6
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One of my plots is alongside an old barn, which I am sure was covered in red lead paint at some point in its history, so I looked up lead and vegetables. It seems that you are pretty safe with fruits (tomatoes, peas etc), but not with root vegetables (carrots, potatoes, etc) or some leaf vegetables. Why don't you put some plastic down under your containers?

P_Synthesis
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Thanks for the replies.
gumbo2176 wrote:I've done a bit of roofing in my lifetime and I've never seen a lead roof.
This could be my cluelessness of course.

So for example lead flashing:

[img]https://www.howardcaineconservatories.co.uk/Images/Detail5.jpg[/img]

... is that made of actual lead or not?

I hear you on the heat thing. On my roof wind will also be a test for some of them.

@TZ -OH6 yes plastic would probably work... I just wondered if there was something that could seal it, I may be remembering it from a chance remark...

gumbo2176
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P_Synthesis wrote:Thanks for the replies.
gumbo2176 wrote:I've done a bit of roofing in my lifetime and I've never seen a lead roof.
This could be my cluelessness of course.

So for example lead flashing:

[img]https://www.howardcaineconservatories.co.uk/Images/Detail5.jpg[/img]

... is that made of actual lead or not?

I hear you on the heat thing. On my roof wind will also be a test for some of them.


That flashing is lead and that is a common practice since it is easily formed to most any shape. A lot of folks use either that or copper in that application since it is so hard to replace the flashing if it gets damaged or goes bad over time.

So, you're saying your entire roof is covered in lead? Gotta say, I've never seen that before. My thinking is lead is way too easily damaged because it is so soft. You can tear fairly thick sheets of lead with your hands and it is easily punctured----------but easily repaired if damaged.

Is there any way you can put down something like decking material on the roof to elevate the pots/plants off the surface. I did that once to an old house here in New Orleans that had a flat roof that was accessible from the 2nd floor. I built square 3'x3' wooden units out of redwood and laid them out side by side to form a deck over the roof. I alternated the direction of the wood on each panel to give it more eye appeal. The owner wanted them to be easily removed to clean debris from under the decking a couple times a year. Redwood is light, rot resistant, looks great and ages nicely if left alone. Have you thought about something like that?

gumbo2176
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I don't know what's up with the double posts. That's twice in the last 2 days it's happened to me. Sorry about that.

P_Synthesis
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gumbo2176 wrote:So, you're saying your entire roof is covered in lead? Gotta say, I've never seen that before.
No, but the bit I want to use does seem to have it on the horizontal surface. It's really just a bit, like at one edge. It happens to work the way it's laid out...

I think plastic would be a lot easier than decking! But it is a thought... THanks.[/i]



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