DoubleDogFarm
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Just order a pound of dry shelling beans

I ordered,

1/2lb of Etna (68 days)
1/2lb of California Blackeye 46 ( 60 days)

Have any of you have experience with these two dry beans?

I went for these two because of the short maturity dates.

Eric

garden5
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I found some interesting things on them:

[url=https://www.plantertomato.com/2010/06/growing-etna-bush-beans-and-recipe.html]Etna[/url]

[url=https://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/filelibrary/5506/25615.pdf]California Blackeye[/url]
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soil
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i love beans, we grow a lot of heirloom varieties from Mexico.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

DoubleDogFarm
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Soil,

Have any good advice on growing dry shelling beans?

Eric

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digitS'
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Blotting off all the bean plants after one of your Western Washington mists, Eric. Terry cloth towels should work well. Those little packets of desiccant that are in medicine bottles - scatter those around the garden.

:wink:

Okay, I suspect that it wouldn't be a good idea to crowd the plants. Air circulation is important. And, especially so for your part of the world.

I've noticed that you plant in beds, Eric. I often plant beans in beds and tend to crowd them, a little. One thing that helps keep the pods off the ground is to run baling twine ~ even for the bush beans. Keeping the twine taut allows the plants to lean on the twine even if they aren't a vining variety.

I don't know about your California Blackeye. The Etna is a bush type, as I understand it. Commercial ag is usually "in charge" of crops like this. They have bred bush varieties for their own purposes. That doesn't mean that a bush Pinto, for example, is best for the home gardener. You may want to explore pole beans for your dry bean crops.

Steve
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DoubleDogFarm
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Blotting off all the bean plants after one of your Western Washington mists, Eric. Terry cloth towels should work well. Those little packets of desiccant that are in medicine bottles - scatter those around the garden.
LMFAO Nah! I'll just plant Wax beans. The water will bead up and roll off. :P

I'm tilling up the 6ft aisle I have in the garden. This will be used for beans, corn and maybe squash. I like the baling twine idea. I'll make a grid with post and twine.

I'll look into pole varieties also. Thanks Steve.

Eric

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