User avatar
Avonnow
Green Thumb
Posts: 337
Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2010 7:01 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Florida

Onions

[img]https://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc119/Avonnow/DSCF0679.jpg[/img]

I planted these onions last winter - from seed, they started growing and then just dried up - they are so small - they were called Savannah sweet.
I did think they would be much bigger, can I relpant them or our they done? They were in well drained soil and were well take care of. Not sure why this happened, any thoughts?
I love this! - There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Most likely if you replant they will just go to seed.

Savannah Sweet Hybrid is a Northern Variety. Not suited for Florida.

Have them for dinner or supper.

Eric
Last edited by DoubleDogFarm on Sun May 22, 2011 4:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

tedln
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2178
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:06 pm
Location: North Texas

I think Eric is right. You need to do a little research and determine the best varieties to grow in your zone and climate. I also don't know if fall is the best season to plant onions in your area. It certainly isn't in my zone 7b garden. In my area in the fall, each day has less sunlight than the day before. In mid January, each day has a slightly longer day of sunlight than the day before. The progressively longer days are what onions need. I plant starts or seedlings in January for a mid March into mid June harvest. I start harvesting small table onions in mid March and continue harvesting larger and larger onions into June when the tops fall over and dry up. Right now I still have some small table onions and a lot of 4" slicing onions for the sandwiches. The seedlings I planted were all of the same variety, grown in identical conditions, and planted on the same date. Some remain small until harvested while some grow huge.

Onions also prefer soil with a lot of organics in it and they are heavy nitrogen consumers.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

TWC015
Senior Member
Posts: 207
Joined: Sat Mar 27, 2010 12:43 pm
Location: Jefferson Co., Arkansas

I looked up the variety you planted and it says they are short day onions, which would be appropriate for your area. Also the name Savannah Sweet sounds appropriate.

Your onions may have gotten a disease and died early which caused them to have small bulbs. This year, right when my onions began bulbing, we had a week of rain, clouds, and high humidity. Within a week, my onion plants went from really healthy and actively growing to every leaf turning brown. It happened so quickly there was not much to do. About half of my onions were affected. It also only affected the transplants I bought; the onions I planted from seeds are still growing fine.

Fall is an appropriate time to plant onions from seed in Florida. This will cause the onions to grow more leaves before they begin bulbing. I planted onion seeds in September here and they did fine. They stopped growing in late December and January, but resumed growth in early February and only one plant bolted this year.

User avatar
Avonnow
Green Thumb
Posts: 337
Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2010 7:01 pm
Location: Merritt Island, Florida

Onions

I did research these and they were for my area, I guess I may be off on my timing to plant them, I somehow thought if I did seed they would grow slower though the fall and winter and then pick up in the early spring when most stores here are selling those starter sets (which I got some as well) They are not rotten, but they are small. I am not devasted - just have to do some more research, it has been unseasonably hot and some days very humid and I am not sure how much this effects them. I do water regularly and they are all in raised beds in sun light. I really wanted to see how I would do with seeds, looks I may have to go with starter sets. Seemed like along time to wait for this. :cry:
I love this! - There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Sorry guys, looks like you are right.

This site has wrong tip information.
Tip: 'Long-day onions', better suited to the North, need 13+ hours of daylight for best development, while 'short-day varieties' need less and thrive in regions with a mild winter climate.
https://www.vegetableandflowerseeds.com/product/Savannah_Sweet_Hybrid_Onion/onion_seeds

Eric

tedln
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 2178
Joined: Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:06 pm
Location: North Texas

Avonnow,

I planted about 150, Texas Super Sweet seedlings in late summer last year just to see how they would perform in the fall. I had never tried growing them in the fall. Home Depot was selling them and I thought maybe they knew something I didn't know about growing onions. They performed well as green onions in the fall and winter. I always plant onions with the intent and desire for them to produce large bulbs, but also eat some as they are growing. They stopped growing after we had our first hard freeze. I had the seedlings spread out in different beds, so when I planted the 1014 seedlings in mid January, I also pulled the remainder of the Super Sweets and consolidated them into one bed. I was still in hopes I could get large bulbs from them. It quickly became apparent their only intent was to produce flower stalks which meant the bulbs had reached their maximum size. We finished eating them as large green onions in the early spring while the 1014 seedlings were just starting to grow.

Growing onions can be tricky with a lot of little details that need attention. I guess if you only want green table onions, the details are not so important. If you want large onion bulbs, you have to pay attention to the details.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

Return to “Vegetable Gardening Forum”