gardenbean
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Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:47 pm
Location: Westminster Colorado

Receving a lot of rain this month

and I am concerned about my garden in regards to getting nasty stuff like fungus. So far all of my cool crops love the cool temps and water (my cabbages, bruseel sprouts and broccoli) but I am concerned about my tomatos?

Will this abundance of water and cool temps hurt them and what can I do to help them along this "bump in the road"...........cause I know by the end of July I'll be wishing for that rain to come along. :lol:
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

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SPierce
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Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:57 am
Location: Massachusetts

As long as they look happy and healthy, I wouldn't worry! I am in the same situation,m and i've been watching my in-ground tomato seedlings double in size over the last day (seriously). All the leaves still look healthy, happy and at least no bugs have hit them yet, cause they don't like the rain either!

How cool are your temps getting? We've had anywhere from 49-68 lately, and so far so good!

ruggr10
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Location: Brunswick, Maine

We've gotten a ton of rain here too.

This is the first day I've kept all my seedlings in the garage that I normally put outside during the day (tomatoes, some squash, peppers, ground cherries, cape gooseberries, chinese wolfberries). They have just been getting dumped on day after day with no sun.

In the ground, my strawberry plants have love the rain but my lettuce, broccoli rapini, and chinese cabbage have had some yellowing leaves.

It's sad but I have to look forward all the way to Sunday and then next Thursday to have any sun!

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Handsomeryan
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Location: Mt. Airy MD, USA

Not exactly what you were asking about but it falls within the spirit of the topic you've started...

What would you think if you walked outside after a few days of rain and overcast skies and saw a bunch of your plants looked like this?
[img]https://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h170/HandsomeRyan/odema.jpg[/img]

What you are looking at is not a pest or a disease but rather a physiological condition caused by too much moisture known as oedema. There isn't much you can do about it but it is important to know what it is so you avoid excessive spraying trying to control a pest or disease you don't actually have.

As far as fungus growth- I'd just watch your plants closely and be ready to treat at the first sign of a problem. Fungus is a lot easier to stop than it is to get rid of once it has a foothold.
Gardening is mostly an issue of your enthusiasm holding up until you get used to the work.

gardenbean
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Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:47 pm
Location: Westminster Colorado

:shock: Yikes! Thanks Handyman for the pictures of the leafs.I will indeed keep an eye out. Hopefully, I won't run into this problem. And am glad to know that I am not the only one being dumped on with rain.
Learning as I go and surprising myself when it all comes together......

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Huh. I've seen the less severe bubbling of the under leaf before. Now I know what it's called and what causes them... thanks!

BTW, are the holes due to oedema as well? -- they resemble slug/snail damage.

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Handsomeryan
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Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:57 pm
Location: Mt. Airy MD, USA

The holes are caused by the plant cells collapsing after they become overly full of water and the cell walls burst. Not all plants experiencing oedema will look exactly like this though.
Gardening is mostly an issue of your enthusiasm holding up until you get used to the work.



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